MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.5.1983

There’s a Scottish theme to this edition of Shoot, with Kenny Dalglish and Charlie Nicholas sharing the cover with Aberdeen, facing Real Madrid in the European Cup Winners Cup Final.

As you open the magazine, there are features on Dalglish and Nicholas, voted Most Exciting Player and Most Exciting Young Player respectively.

In news, Manchester United, Ipswich Town and West Ham United are showing an interest in Leicester City’s Gary Lineker, while West Bromwich Albion have denied that Martin Jol and Romeo Zondervan will be leaving the club.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to express his delight at being recalled to the England squad, and paying tribute to Manchester United team-mate Martin Buchan ahead of his testimonial.

Another United player with England ambitions is Gary Bailey, who tells Shoot that he is ready for a call-up. Shoot lists rivals for a place in the squad, which includes Andy Goram of Oldham Athletic.

Across Manchester, Kevin Bond tells Shoot of his delight at winning over Manchester City supporters following a difficult start to his time at the club.

Following Jimmy Case’s winning goal from a free-kick for Brighton in the FA Cup Semi-Final, Shoot does a double page spread on the importance of goals from set pieces.

There is a feature on 15 year old Dean Vokes, who won a competition to be Assistant Manager to Malcolm MacDonald at Fulham for a day. Fulham beat Charlton 2-1.

As the 1982-1983 season comes to an end, Shoot does a feature on four hat-trick during the season, by Clive Allen, Ian Rush, Luther Blissett and Gary brooke

Aberdeen’s match against Real Madrid gets previewed with Alex Ferguson doing a profile of the Aberdeen squad for Shoot.

There is also a profile of the Real Madrid squad.

Bobby Russell of Rangers uses the Tartan Talk column to reveal that he planned on emigrating to New Zealand as a teenager, but red tape stopped it, something he says he is grateful for in retrospect.

Phil Thompson uses his column to speak of his pride at winning his 7th title medal, a record for a player in English football, predicting that there will be more to come.

In West Germany, football authorities have expressed concern at falling attendances in the top flight.

Shoot does a feature on Andy Ritchie and Terry Connor, who have moved opposite ways in a player swap between Leeds ans Brighton.

England are hosting the European Youth Championship, with England manager Graham Taylor, who would be appointed senior manager in 1990, praising the youth football of neighbours and holders Scotland.

Gary Shaw uses his column to congratulate Aston Villa team-mate Peter Withe on being selected for the England team for their recent match against Hungary.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Flanagan of QPR, who reveals his favourite singers are Joe Jackson and Elkie Brookes.

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CRUSADERS 2-0 LINFIELD 14.4.2018

After two successive wins at the start of the split, Linfield headed to Seaview looking for a third successive win to keep control of third place, and possible automatic qualification for next season’s UEFA Cup.

Next season’s UEFA Cup is a competition that Crusaders want to avoid playing in, currently top of the League only on goal difference.

Both teams were going for goal early on, with Jordan Owens and Andrew Waterworth both having shots on goal saved.

Linfield were holding their own, but it was Crusaders whose attacks were causing the most concerning, always having an option to pass or cross to every time they went forward.

On 15 minutes, Crusaders took the lead when a cross landed at an unmarked Jordan Owens, who had enough time to set himself up to finish from close range.

Questions have to be ask how Owens was unmarked in the six yard box. It wasn’t even a quick attack, why didn’t somebody get close to him?

Once again, Linfield concede a goal to Crusaders that is basic, and of their own doing.

The important thing was that heads didn’t go down.

Linfield almost got an instant equaliser when a neat passing move between Kurtis Byrne and Andrew Waterworth played in Stephen Fallon whose shot was smothered by Crusaders goalkeeper Brian Jensen.

Linfield were creating chances and were encouraged by this. Mark Stafford intercepted just as Jensen was going to pick up a free-kick, with Andrew Waterworth being unable to finish when the ball fell to him.

Despite Linfield’s attacking encouragement, it was clear that they were missing Jamie Mulgrew.

When Mulgrew gets the ball, his first intention is to go forward. Well, until he is fouled.

Neither Stephen Lowry or Andrew Mitchell were doing that. Nobody was driving forward from midfield.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Roy Carroll was the Linfield player who received the most passes, such was the lack of imagination going forward at times.

Stephen Fallon had another shot saved by Jensen, pouncing after he spilled a shot from Kurtis Byrne.

Billy Joe Burns almost scored from a cross come shot before a snapshot from Andrew Waterworth forced Jensen to turn it behind for a corner.

That resulting corner was the final actions of the first-half. The whistle blew with a Crusaders player injured in the penalty box. As Andrew Waterworth went to check on his welfare, a pack of Crusaders players surrounded him like feral wolves.

After midweek events in Madrid, this is a topical issue in football. However, the referee did nothing about it. Waterworth was already on a yellow card and the Crusaders players were targeting him. They knew what they were doing.

As the teams left the pitch, Colin Coates and Jordan Owens were trying to generate cheers in front of the home stand, like it was WWE or Panto. The absolute state of them.

That should have been David Healy’s half-time team talk sorted.

You can laugh at all of Cristano Ronaldo’s posturing, he can back it up by being one of the greatest players of all time with individual achievements and winners medals to go with it.

Watching a bunch of nobodies like Coates and Owens acting like Billy Big Balls should have been motivation to put them back in their box where they should have been put back in 2014.

Despite being 1-0 down, there were signs of encouragement for Linfield. They had chances and were creating chances. There were goals for Linfield if they went at Crusaders and attacked them, especially as their were playing towards where their fans were based.

Those attacks, never materialised.

In the early minutes of the second-half, Gavin Whyte had a free-kick saved by Carroll while Carroll saved a Jordan Owens header.

Linfield’s response. Um, ahhhh, erm ……

Kirk Millar had a free-kick which was overhit and went out for a goal kick.

Even if he did get it towards the penalty spot, there probably would have been a Crusaders head getting there first.

That was a theme throughout the game, Crusaders were first to every ball. Even though the wind was blowing and the pitch wasn’t bouncey, Linfield players were anticipating the ball, they weren’t in position to get the second ball. Too many Linfield attacks were ended because Crusaders players were first to the clearance.

David Healy was slow to change things. Probably because there weren’t a lot of options.

There were three attackers on the bench – Ryan Strain, Louis Rooney and Achille Campion, but not a lot of goals. You didn’t look at anyone on the bench and think “Yes, he’ll get us a goal”.

It’s quite damming that the biggest goal threat on Linfield’s bench was Jimmy Callacher.

Strain and Campion came on for Byrne and Fallon.

The grandstand finish never materialised as the game meandered. You would have thought it was a mid table clash between two sides with nothing to play for.

Having seen how vulnerable Crusaders were last weekend when 1-0 up, Linfield should have been grabbing the game by the throat and pushing for an equaliser, especially as they were attacking their own fans.

Even more so as by this point, Glenavon were 3-1 up at Solitude, putting them 3rd, one point ahead of Linfield. The race for 3rd was now being decided by the fact that Glenavon got a point at Seaview and Linfield didn’t.

This game at Solitude was Glenavon’s first win in seven games. There was no way they were going to go the final two months of the season without a win. Linfield had to grab every point that they could.

With two minutes remaining, Jordan Owens headed home to make it 2-0 and make sure of the points for Crusaders, not that they were in any danger of surrendering them. Linfield never looked like scoring.

What made it worse was the lack of ideas, hoofing the ball upfield, playing right into Crusaders.

In the space of one season, Linfield players have regressed into fearing Crusaders, just as they did between 2012 and 2016.

How many times do they need to be told? Do not be afraid of Crusaders. There is no need to be afraid of Crusaders.

Louis Rooney came on for Matthew Clarke as Linfield went to 3-4-3. Too little, too late.

By now, away fans were heading to the exits. They didn’t miss much, apart from an Andrew Mitchell red card, giving the Crusaders fans what they wanted. Once again, Linfield had been outsmarted by a stupid team.

For most of the game, the main saving grace for Linfield was that Cliftonville and Glenavon were drawing 0-0.

That meant that despite the defeat, Linfield would be one point clear of Glenavon and four points clear of Cliftonville in the race for 3rd.

Four goals and a red card in the space of ten minutes gave Glenavon a 3-1 win.

Glenavon are now 3rd, a point clear of Linfield and six clear of Cliftonville. Cliftonville can still catch Glenavon, but a goal difference of eleven in Glenavon’s favour which would be need to be overturned in four matches makes that unlikely.

Glenavon boosted their goal difference by four goals today, giving them five over Linfield. If Linfield are to get 3rd place, it won’t be on Goal Difference.

Next weekend, Glenavon are at home to Ballymena United. Once again, Linfield are looking for a favour from Ballymena United on Matchday 37. I would expect Glenavon to win that game. The only hope is, Ballymena must surely be due a win.

Next Saturday, Linfield are at home to Coleraine. I can’t say i’ve much expectation going into this game.

If Linfield were to win next Saturday, it would present the title to a bunch of Hoofball Thugs. In truth, the title was always going to be won by an unbearable shower. Linfield’s interest in the title race ended a long time ago. They didn’t even look like making much of an impact on it today.

Not going to lie, I really can’t be arsed with the UEFA Cup Play-Offs, it’s an utter farce. It should be Top Three in the League plus the Cup Winners, or Fourth if the Irish Cup win won by a team in the Top Three.

If that is the fate we are given, then we must be ready. When that is, is anyone’s guess, as the dates haven’t been announced. I would expect Tuesday 8th May and Friday 11th May.

Even if Glenavon finish 3rd, it would still be advantageous for Linfield if Cliftonville lose the Irish Cup Final, as they would be going into the Play-Offs on the back of a major disappointment and could struggle to life themselves for it. Plus, it would give Linfield home advantage (assuming they finish 4th) should they reach the Final.

Elsewhere, it was announced that Brandon Adams has left the club with immediate effect. That was no real surprise. He’s seemed to score for fun for Linfield Swifts but could never do it for the first team.

I know he has been restricted to substitute appearances, but there’s never been a time he has come off the bench where I have thought that he has to start the next game.

This week, saw St Patrick’s Athletic announce plans for a new stadium meaning i’ll have to try and fit in one last visit to Richmond Park on a future annual day trip to Dublin.

That may not be the smartest idea, as I have been to Richmond Park twice, in 2010 and 2013, with both games ending 0-0.

I’m doing a day trip to Dublin in July. The two matches on while i’m there. The options are Bohemians v Sligo Rovers and Shelbourne v Drogheda United. I’ll keep you updated on that.

Elsewhere, Spartans won the Lowland League. You may remember them facing Linfield in the Scottish Challenge Cup in September

Regular readers will know I keep an eye out for their results as I go to Edinburgh every August, and plan on seeing them if they get promoted to League Two, if they are at home when I am in Edinburgh.

All they have to do is win a Play-Off against the Highland League Champions (Cove Rangers), and then win a Play-Off against the side that finished bottom of League Two (Cowdenbeath).

Not going to lie, I can’t wait for this season to end. At least the World Cup will distract me from how farcical this season has been.

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THE FRIDAY FIVE – 13.4.2018

1. Editors – Darkness At The Door
2. Halsey – Alone
3. Ash – Annabel
4. James – Better Than That
5. Pound Shop Boys – Fireman Sam

Madness doing a concert in Dublin in July supported by The Lightning Seeds. Come on lads, sneak in a Belfast gig while you’re at it.

Managed to get myself sorted for a ticket for David Hepworth at CQAF. Going to have a proper browse through the programme this week.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SMASH HITS – 20.11.1985

George Michael is the cover star of Smash Hits, as Wham! are once again riding high in the charts.

1985 was the year of Live Aid, and the Fashion industry joined in with Fashion Aid, an event attended by the likes of Freddie Mercury, Suggs and Boy George.

Feargal Sharkey is interviewed, where he reveals he doesn’t like Ginger Nuts and isn’t very good at sports.

Wham! get a four page feature, where they reveal that their new single I’m Your Man is about sex.

In ads, there is an advert for a new single called West End Girls by an unknown band called Pet Shop Boys.

Also getting interviewed this week is the band Mai Tai.

Paul Hardcastle is subject to a Q and A. It wasn’t N-n-n-n-n-n-nineteen questions long, but he did reveal that Joan Collins is his favourite actress.

Concert Reviews sees Smash Hits head to Glasgow for Midge Ure doing a hometown show at Barrowlands Ballroom.

There’s no guest reviewer for Singles, as In Embrace got voted Best Single.

New products on the markets were Popic Watches, watches with the image of your favourite pop band on them.

Enjoying a good review were Jesus and Mary Chain, whose new album got awarded 9 and a half out of 10.

LINFIELD 2-0 BALLYMENA UNITED 7.4.2018

A late run of form saw Ballymena claim the last place in the Top Six ahead of Glentoran. It wasn’t just the obvious opportunity to laugh at Glentoran having a second successive season of Bottom Six football. Having paid for a Season Ticket last summer, and liking to watch my pennies, having three home games and not having to go to The Oval today was also a positive.

A week long break after that win over Ballinamallard killed Ballymena’s momentum, and they couldn’t recover it on Easter Tuesday, losing 3-0 at home to Cliftonville.

That win for Cliftonville, combined with Linfield’s win over Glenavon meant that 3rd place Glenavon and 5th place Cliftonville were separated by two points, with Linfield sandwiched in 4th, level with Glenavon.

Depending on the result of the Irish Cup Final, 3rd place could guarantee an automatic place in Europe next season. Every point is vital, Linfield had to grab three of them today, especially with Glenavon and Cliftonville travelling away to the top two.

Linfield were unchanged from Tuesday night’s game. A bit surprising, as Jimmy Callacher was available after serving a one match ban, Josh Robinson kept his place, with Callacher on the bench. Robert Garrett was serving the second game of his two match ban.

Not a lot happened in this first-half, but what did happen, Andrew Waterworth was involved.

He had Linfield’s first attempt on goal, creating space for himself before firing over, as well as having a goal disallowed for offside. Looked it, so no complaints.

Waterworth also got himself a yellow card for shoulder barging a Ballymena player who accused him of diving, four days after a Glenavon player didn’t even get a yellow card for pushing him over.

That’s the sort of consistency we love from Irish League Referees.

Trying to goad Linfield players seemed to be a tactic by Ballymena in the first-half, with several of their players trying to gang up on Kurtis Byrne after a collision with Jim Ervin. Thankfully, Linfield players didn’t take the bait.

Linfield had to make a first-half sub when Niall Quinn went off injured, replaced by Stephen Fallon.

Conor McCloskey had the only first-half shot after a run, which was easily and spectacularly saved by Roy Carroll, for the benefit of Photographers.

Linfield needed to step it up in the second-half, especially when they digested the half-time scores from elsewhere.

Glenavon were 1-0 down away to Crusaders, which meant that Linfield would jump above them, but Cliftonville were 1-0 up away to Coleraine, meaning they would now be level on points with Linfield, and have a lot of momentum going in their favour.

There was a scenario pre-match where a 0-0 draw for Linfield and a 4-1 win for Cliftonville would see Linfield and Cliftonville level on points with identical records. Linfield’s part of that “bargain” was lookign very likely to happen.

Mark Stafford was involved in the early minutes of the second-half, producing a goal saving tackle as Matthew Shevlin looked set to finished after a run. Minutes later, he headed home from a corner to put Linfield 1-0 up in a game where the first goal was vital.

There were a few corners before that which went right to the penalty spot area. Either nobody attacked or a Ballymena player got their first. All Linfield needed was for one of their players to win it, and they were going to get their reward.

It was also an unexpected consequence of Niall Quinn’s absence. The corner came in from the right hand side, with Kirk Millar taking it due to no left footed set piece takers on the pitch, an outwsinger, where it would have been an inswinger if Quinn was on the pitch.

Roy Carroll was forced into a couple of saved from long range shots, as Linfield needed a second goal.

That almost came from a shot from Kurtis Byrne from outside the box, but it was tipped onto the post.

He got it a few minutes later when Kirk Millar kept the ball in on the byline, going forward to Andrew Waterworth close to the corner flag. He waited for the moment to cross, and did so just as Byrne was running through, finishing from close range to give Linfield the points.

Byrne and Waterworth were replaced by Achille Campion and Louis Rooney, with Campion and Rooney combining to create a chance for Stephen Lowry, who couldn’t bundle the ball home from close range. It didn’t matter.

Results elswhere took a dramatic turn, with Glenavon coming from behind to get a draw at Crusaders, while Coleraine came from behind to get a late win against Cliftonville.

That means that Linfield are now 3rd. I can’t remember the last time they were that high. Most importantly, they have a five point lead over Cliftonville with nine points to play for.

Net Saturday, Cliftonville are at home to Glenavon. A draw would be perfect. Whatever the result, Linfield can pull clear of one or both of them with a win at Seaview.

Although results against Crusaders this season have been poor this season (being kind), there’s no reason why Linfield can’t go to Seaview and win.

Crusaders are in a rut, they’ve only won two of their last five games.

If we go there, get stuck in, attack them, and make sure we defend properly, we are more than capable of getting the three points. Basically, just do everything we haven’t done against them this season. Linfield are the form team of the two, relatively speaking.

So, a win, a clean sheet, and other results went our way. That’s what I would call a good day.

Linfield won’t win the League this season, but they will have a big say in who does, with Crusaders and Coleraine coming up next. Hopefully, we’ll have the biggest voice in who finishes 3rd.

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GLENAVON 2-3 LINFIELD 3.4.2018

Linfield faced Glenavon on Easter Tuesday, just as they did last year. The goal was a lot different.

You’ll be hearing comparisons to last year, it’s the same fixture list. Curiously, the venues for all five games are different from last year.

The goal for Linfield was now 3rd place, which would guarantee European football if Coleraine win the Irish Cup.

Linfield were sandwiched in 4th, three points behind Glenavon and two ahead of Cliftonville. A win for Linfield would see them level on points with Glenavon. A three goal win for Linfield would see them overtake Glenavon. Most of us would be happy with just a one goal win.

It wasn’t just a new housing development near Mourneview Park called Linen Fields as they walked to the ground (Yes, a housing development near a football ground named after a rival team) that made Linfield fans feel at home, it was four wins and a draw from their last five visits to Lurgan.

There were two changes to Linfield’s starting eleven, both enforced through suspensions, with Josh Robinson coming in for Jimmy Callacher and Andrew Mitchell coming in for Robert Garrett.

Linfield started the game on the attack, resulting in Kirk Millar getting in behind Glenavon’s defence inside the first minute, only to be denied by a tackle, which fell to Stephen Lowry, whose shot was saved, then hit the post, before a Mark Haughey shot went behind for a corner. Linfield’s season summed up in one move.

The positive was, Linfield were up for it and Glenavon looked off the pace. Linfield had to take advantage of it.

That is what they did from the resulting corner, when Mark Stafford headed goalwards. It probably would have been cleared, but for Kurtis Byrne finishing it off and heading home from a few yards out to give Linfield the lead.

Linfield didn’t stop there, continuing to attack Glenavon. Just like in the meeting at Mourneview in November, Glenavon’s defence were in fear of Andrew Waterworth, panicking every time the ball went near him, or he went near them in search of the ball.

He knew there was a goal, or goals, to be had for him.

Andrew Mitchell was next on the scoresheet. Unfortunately, it was the Glenavon one and not the Linfield one.

It was Glenavon’s first real attack of note, a simple header won and an easy finish from close range.

Linfield dusted themselves down and were straight on the attack, winning a corner.

That corner was punched clear to Andrew Mitchell, the Linfield one. He had the option of a first time cross or a pass to Niall Quinn, who was free and in space.

Mitchell went for the cross, but it was poor. He got lucky though, as the clearance fell to Niall Quinn, whose cross was headed home by Andrew Waterworth to put Linfield back in front.

That lead saw some moments of threat during the rest if the half, with Matthew Clarke having to make a goal line clearance, while Andrew Mitchell headed over in the final moments of the half.

Glenavon started the second-half strongly, Linfield couldn’t get out of their half. It was no surprise when Glenavon made it 2-2 on 54 minutes when Bobby Burns finished a cross from close range.

Glenavon had all the momentum and looked set to go on and win the game. Or so they thought.

Straight from kick-off, Linfield were straight on the attack, and a low cross found Stephen Lowry, who scored from the rebound after his shot was saved.

Incredibly, Linfield had scored just over a minute after the game kicked off, for the third time.

If you were to compile a list of the silliest games in the Irish League over the past four years, Glenavon would feature prominently. This was another to add to the list.

Linfield have more than enough silly games this season. Thankfully, they were on the right side of the silliness.

Linfield needed a two goal lead just to be sure. They had a glorious opportunity when Andrew Waterworth was played through.

He had two options, to finish low, or to pass it left and give Niall Quinn an open net. He did neither, as Tuffey saved his shot.

Linfield fans had a sense of deja vu. We’d seen this all before. We knew what the ending wuld be. A last minute Glenavon equaliser, and we’d all be ruing that missed opportunity.

Glenavon had attempts on goal, but nothing that worried Linfield. The only real moment of worry came a Glenavon threw himself to the ground after a cross in injury time. You are always that way with Irish League referees.

Linfield had their chances on the counter, with Andrew Waterworth and Niall Quinn hitting the side netting from tight angles.

Linfield weren’t to regret those chances, as they saw out the game to win 3-2. It wasn’t the three goal win that would have put them 3rd, but it did put them level with Glenavon. Cliftonville won 3-0 away to Ballymena to remain two points clear of Cliftonville. It’s just as tight between 3rd and 5th as it is between 1st and 2nd.

The three goals that separate Linfield and Glenavon are more than retrievable. Unfortunately, so are the three goals and two points that separate Linfield and Cliftonville.

There’s even the possibility that Linfield and Cliftonville could be level on points with identical records. Imagine if they finished joint 3rd and Coleraine win the Irish Cup. That would be some fun arranging a Play-Off to avoid playing in the UEFA Cup Play-Offs.

Realistically, it’s between Linfield and Cliftonville for 3rd. Glenavon look shot.

After the game, Glenavon manager Gary Hamilton criticised the referee’s performance. But he definitely definitely definitely wasn’t putting the referee under pressure for Glenavon’s next match.

I doubt Coleraine fans were too unhappy to hear his comments.

One result that did work in Linfield’s favour on Saturday was Crusaders drawing 1-1 at home to Coleraine. It keeps the title race alive, which is handy as Crusaders face Glenavon and Coleraine face Cliftonville on Saturday. Meanwhile, Linfield are at home to Ballymena United.

You would expect at least one of Glenavon and Cliftonville, possibly both, to fail to win. Saturday’s fixtures represent a great opportunity for Linfield to get points on the board in the race for 3rd. We have to take advantage of it.

The Saturday before this saw the Irish Cup Semi-Finals go the way as expected. Cliftonville’s game against Loughgall was always going to be unbearable, whatever the result.

The fact that Cliftonville had the game won in six minutes made the Quarter-Final worse. That really was one thrown away.

Hopefully, by the time the Irish Cup Final comes around, Linfield will be in a position to have some benefit of Coleraine.

What will I be doing that day? Going to see David Hepworth at CQAF.

Slightly off topic, but i’ve got a real random urge to go travelling somewhere. I don’t know where, but I just want to go somewhere.

One trip i’m hoping to do in August, isn’t too far, but needs a few things to fall into place.

Embrace are confirmed as headlining Stendhal Festival in Limavady in August. Now, I just need a few things to fall into place. I would need it to be Saturday 11th August, and for Linfield to be away to Institute that day. That would be a very tempting day trip. Then I just need to sort out accommodation.

Last Sunday, Sunday Life reporting that the UEFA Cup Play-Offs would be taking place at Windsor Park on Saturday 12th May, a day long event of football at Windsor Park with the first match kicking off at 12pm and the last game at 7.45pm, meaning teams having two or possibly three games in one day.

And then you check the date, Sunday 1st April. April Fool. The worrying thing is, this is Irish League football, you could almost believe somebody proposed it.

And so, we leave on a sad note, with the death of Adam Coates, the voice of Irish League football when I was growing up.

I remember at The Oval, they wouldn’t bother playing music at half-time, but just play Sportsound over the tannoy, and when they did the half-time report of the match at The Oval, the fans of the team that were winning would let out a big roar when the score was announced.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT 29.3.1986

Mark Wright is the cover star of Shoot as he wants to be part of the England squad that goes to Mexico 86 after being dropped for England’s recent friendly in Israel.

His determination to reach Mexico was in vain, as a broken leg sustained playing for Southampton would rule him out, though he would get to play for England in the 1990 World Cup.

The countdown to Mexico is in full swing, as Northern Ireland face fellow finalists Denmark in a friendly at Windsor Park, with Shoot doing a feature on 40 year old goalkeeper Pat Jennings, as Northern Ireland aim to keep a 7th successive clean sheet.

They wouldn’t get it as the match finished a 1-1 draw.

Another veteran hoping to go to Mexico was Kenny Dalglish, now player-manager at Liverpool, on the verge of winning his 100th cap in Scotland in the friendly against Romania. However, like the cover star Mark Wright, he would have the action at home after missing out through injury.

Not to be left out, Wales get a feature, as their recent friendly saw a changing on the guard, as Joey Jones retired as joint most capped player, while Malcolm Allen made his debut, and was already compared to Mark Hughes.

Wales are in Dublin for a friendly as the opposition in Jack Charlton’s first game as Republic of Ireland manager, and Charlton gets a full page feature.

BBC pundit Bob Wilson gets a double page column, where he states that Bruce Grobbelaar is the best goalkeeper in England.

Another Scotsman writing for Shoot is Charlie Nicholas, writing about his boyhood idol Kenny Dalglish, who scored six goals for Celtic against Kilmarnock in the first game Nicholas went to, and urges Alex Ferguson to select him for Scotland’s World Cup squad.

Bryan Robson uses his column to hit back at Kevin Keegan, who suggested that he should be playing a Sweeper role for England, stating that his best position is as an attacking midfielder.

This edition is all about the World Cup, as Hungary get a full page feature, looking at their chances in Mexico.

Hearts, billed as “The club that shocked Scottish soccer” get a double page spread looking at their success under Wallace Mercer.

1986 was an agonising year for them, as they lost the league on the last day, then lost the Scottish Cup Final the following week.

Staying in Scotland, Dundee United manager Jim McLean hits out at stayaway fans, fearing that a lack of gate revenue will force the club to sell stars such as Maurice Malpas and Richard Gough.

Transfer Deadline Day isn’t a modern phenomenon, as Shoot features Colin West, who signed for Watford on Deadline Day the previous year, and Shoot looked at the changes he had to cope with, moving clubs at short notice.

One player who moved more recently was Peter Davenport, who left Nottingham Forest for Manchester United, tells Shoot that he had joined his dream club, having stood on the Stretford End as a lad.

It was the continent where English players might be moving to in the future, with PFA chief Gordon Taylor warning that English football could be losing it’s star players to clubs from Italy and Spain.

It’s derby say in Birmingham as Villa and City go head to head as both clubs are desperate for points to avoid relegation, with Andy Gray of Villa and Wayne Clarke of Birmingham both interviewed.

Going back to the World Cup, Chris Waddle tells Shoot that he fears getting axed from the England squad due to his poor form.

On the back page, there is a profile of Liam Brady.

SMITHFIELD

A new mural to add to Belfast’s wallspace. It’s actually been up for a few weeks, but i’ve only got a chance to phorograph it now.

It is in Smithfield, near to Smithfield Market, but still a bit of a walk away from it. It depicts old life in Smithfield Market.

It is a collaboration between Kev Largey and Jonny McKerr, whose work has previously featured on this blog.

The reason why i only got round to photographing it now was because there were cars always parked in front of it when I went to get photos. A pain in the arse for anyone who likes to photograph Street Art.

There’s not a lot of people around on Sunday mornings, so I made the most of it.

If you’re looking for an exact address, it is on Gresham Street, beside a pub that was known as The Hudson but is now known as Peaky Blinders. Apparantly, it’s a popular TV show.

I’ll let you in on a secret, pubs in Belfast or popular TV shows aren’t a specialist subject of mine.

If that address sounds familiar, that’s because it was previously home to a mural of David Bowie, which was painted a few weeks after he died in January 2016.

That mural of Bowie is now gone.

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