MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 24.3.1984

It’s the League Cup Final, and this is reflected with both Everton and Liverpool being represented on the cover. Both teams are looking to make history. Liverpool by winning the trophy in four successive seasons, and Everton to win it for the first time.

The match gets a four page preview, with a series of top flight stars being canvassed for their opinion, and the consensus is that Everton will win.

There is a profile of Matchman Of The month, Davie Cooper of Rangers.

Also getting profiled is new Aston Villa signing Steve Foster, who is happy with the move as it means he won’t have to play against Peter Withe, who he rates as his toughest opponent.

Match assesses form of Liverpool and Everton in this season’s League Cup, based on the player ratings in Match Facts, with Everton edging out Liverpool by a score of 6.81 to 6.77.

Plymouth Argyle get profiled as they dream of a trip to Wembley after putting Derby County out of the FA Cup, with a Semi-Final against Watford at Villa Park standing in the way.

It’s also the League Cup Final in Scotland, with the game between Rangers and Celtic getting a double page preview. There is also a poster of Robert Prytz of Rangers.

Ratings seem to be a theme in this magazine, as Glenn Hoddle gets a go at rating Everton and Liverpool’s players.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mark Lawrenson, who says he wants to be a Commentator when he retires.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 26.5.1984

Kevin Richardson and John Bailey are the cover stars of Match, which reviews the FA Cup Final, won by Everton by 2-0 against Watford.

Winning the FA Cup wasn’t enough for Everton captain Kevin Ratcliffe, who wanted this to be the springboard for a league title triumph.

In Scotland, Dumbarton have been promoted to the top flight for the first time, with star striker Kenny Ashwood confident his side can shock a lot of people.

One player leaving Scotland is Gordon Strachan, having left Aberdeen for Manchester United, and United striker Frank Stapleton uses his column to predict that Strachan will be an instant hit at Old Trafford.

Match’s preview of Euro 84 continues with Spain this week’s profiled team.

Ian Wallace has left Nottingham Forest for French side Brest, claiming Forest couldn’t afford to keep him.,

After an absence of 14 years, Sheffield Wednesday are back in the top flight, and midfielder Gary Shelton warning First Division sides not to underestimate them.

There is a double page picture special on York City, who won Division Four with more than 100 points.

England face Scotland at Hampden Park in the British Championship, and this match gets a full page profile.

Northern Ireland are also in action, heading to Finland in their first 1986 World Cup Qualifier.

The magazine ends with a poster of Costica Stefanescu of Romania ahead of the build-up to Euro 84.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 19.5.1984

It’s the FA Cup Final, as Everton and Watford take centre stage on this week’s copy of Match.

There is fighting talk from both teams. Peter Reid states that there is no way Watford will score against Neville Southall, while Mo Johnston is determined to win the cup for suspended captain Wilf Rostrun, and let him lead out the team at Wembley in the following season’s Charity Shield.

Chelsea get a double page feature, having just been promoted to the top flight of English football after an absence of five years.

In foreign news, Juventus have been rocked by the news that Claudio Gentile might be leaving the club in the summer.

Staying in Italy, Luther Blissett of AC Milan tells Match how delighted he is to have been recalled to the England squad.

In preparation of that summer’s European Championship, Match is previewing the teams, with Romania, written down as “Rumania” being this week’s subject.

Graeme Souness uses his column to preview the FA Cup Final, declaring that he can’t see Everton losing.

Andy Gray and George Reilly are profiled, with Gray revealing his favourite singer is Rod Stewart, and that his personal ambition is to have an uneventful private life.

George Reilly’s favourite pop star is Bryan Ferry.

Mark Hughes gets profiled, having broken into Manchester United’s first team this season, revealing that he thought he would have to leave United in order to advance his career.

A team-mate of Hughes in the future will be Gordon Strachan, who is set to join United from Aberdeen, with his last game for the club being the Scottish Cup Final against Celtic, a game Aberdeen will lose according to Hibs goalkeeper Alan Rough, previewing the game for Match.

It had been suggested that Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson has been mellowing, but he told Match that his wife had told him to behave himself.

THE FRIDAY FIVE – 2.6.2017

1. Liam Gallagher – Wall Of Glass
2. The Courteeners – Don’t Look Back In Anger
3. Maggie Rogers – Alaska
4. OMD – Isotype
5. Ray Davies – Broken

In gig news, Erasure have announced a tour for early 2018 with no Belfast gig. Boooo. I’m pining my hopes on Belfast Pride saving the day. Come on, be the heroes we need. DISCLAIMER – I have no inside information, i’m just letting my imagination run wild. What’s the point in having an imagination if you can’t let it run wild?

Liam Gallagher’s first solo show on Tuesday night sounded rather good. I know this, because it seemed like everyone was broadcasting it onto social media via their phone. A reminder that not all heroes wear capes.

I’m not saying I have a favourite Gallagher brother, but Noel does Belfast gigs when he goes on tour.

Hopefully, a full tour will follow when the album is released towards the end of the year.

Meanwhile, the Top Of The Pops juggernaut on BBC Four has reached 1984. The Story Of 1984 is on tonight at 9pm.

So, to celebrate, here’s a 1984 chart for you.

FIVE SONGS FROM 1984

1. Frankie Goes To Hollywood – Two Tribes
2. Wham! – Freedom
3. Duran Duran – Wild Boys
4. Depeche Mode – Master and Servant
5. Strawberry Sitchblade – Since Yesterday

Ryan Adams update. Still looking for a ticket for his Ulster Hall gig in September. Standing, Face Value.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 8.9.1984

Glenn Hoddle is the main cover star of Shoot, alongside a British player abroad, Graeme Souness, and a British player with aspirations of playing abroad, Luther Blissett.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on Gordon Cowans, who has ambitions of going to Mexico. Not to play in the Mexican League, but the 1986 World Cup. His feature had the headline “Memo to Bobby Robson, save a World Cup place for Gordon Cowans”

He didn’t go to Mexico.

Having just rejoined Watford for AC Milan, Luther Blissett has stated that he wants to play abroad again. Before Watford fans paniced, he clarified that it was European competition for the Vicarage Road side that he was wanting to play abroad.

Staying with Watford, manager Graham Taylor had put a £2m fee on Maurice Johnston, who has handed in a transfer request.

In Scotland, Hibs and George Best were in trouble with the SFA after Best played for Hibs in Jackie McNamara’s Testimonial, but was unregistered.

Craig Johnston had missed the start of the season for Liverpool in order to be with his wife and soon to born child, his wife having insisted that the child be born in Australia.

Manchester United’s three new signings Jesper Olsen, Gordon Strachan and Alan Brazil are part of a centre page poster, as United look to win the league for the first time since 1967.

As you turn the page, there is a double page feature on Strachan, where he reveals he supports Hibs, and turned down the chance to sign for United in 1971, having already given his word to Dundee.

Staying in Scotland, new Rangers signing Cammy Fraser was introduced to life at Ibrox by manager Jock Wallace ordering to shave off his moustache.

Peter Shreeves, new manager of Tottenham Hotspur, gets a double page spread, insisting he isn’t afraid of the challenge of succeeding Keith Burkinshaw.

Shoot uses star signs to try and predict the future for footballers such as Neville Southall, Kenny Sansom, Glenn Hoddle and Andy Gray.

QPR get a full page feature, with Ian Stewart giving the lowdown on the club.

In news, Mark McGhee begins his career at Hamburg with a suspension, having been sent-off in a pre-season friendly.

Jimmy Greaves received a letter in support of a Great Britain football team. Greaves replies that he agrees with the idea, but that football shouldn’t be in the Olympics.

The highlight of this edition comes in the form of a double page photo of Trevor Francis and Graeme Souness enjoying their new life in Italy, at Sampdoria, out on a boat trip together, all oiled up and dressed in nothing but Speedos. It is an image that cannot be unseen.

Wilf Rostron of Watford tells Shoot who his favourite wingers are : Pat Nevin, John Barnes and Mark Chamberlain.

Ian Rush uses his column to declare that England can be successful by learning from Liverpool, and that Graeme Souness is better than Michel Platini, and will show it in Serie A.

Beside Rush’s column, is a full page report on the recent Charity Shield, where Everton beat Liverpool 2-0, with the headline “Revenge!”, after Liverpool had beaten Everton in the previous season’s League Cup Final.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise attackers that have recently been on the move – Joe Jordan of Southampton and the Spurs duo of Clive Allen and John Chiedozie.

Charlie Nicholas is prominent towards the end of this issue, telling Shoot he is happy at Arsenal, then appearing in an advert for Nike alongside Glenn Hoddle and Ian Rush.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.8.1984

The 1984-1985 season is about to start, and it’s Mark Hughes, billed as “one of the young hopefuls trying to break into the team at Old Trafford next season” who is the cover star of Shoot.

Shoot gives United a double page spread, saying they have the potential to be England’s biggest box office attraction, due to the number of attacking players in their squad.

Vince Hilare gets a full page profile, after being blasted for leaving Crystal Palace for Luton Town, citing the lure of top flight football and Luton’s attacking style of play as the reason for his move.

Another player on the move is Mick Mills, who has left Ipswich for Southampton. At the age of 36, he feels this is his last chance to win the title, having gone close with Ipswich in 1981 and 1982.

European draws have thrown up trips behind the Iron Curtain for Liverpool and Aberdeen in the European Cup, as well as a Northern Ireland v Republic Of Ireland clash between Linfield and Shamrock Rovers.

The UEFA Table is used to allocate UEFA Cup places based on results, with England top ahead of Italy and USSR.

Shoot does a double page feature on new Barcelona manager Terry Venables, where he describes the job as the biggest test of his career.

Venables old club QPR are getting used to life without him, but Terry Fenwick predicts a title challenge under new manager Alan Mullery.

Charlie Nicholas reveals in his column that Kenny Sansom fancies himself as an impressionist, with Norman Wisdom, Frank Spencer and Prince Charles his favourites.

Shoot looks at he the lack of job security for managers in Scotland, with 20 of the 38 league clubs changing manager between the summers of 1983 and 1984.

Mike Hazard gets a full page feature, having overcome an addiction to chocolate and hamburgers to get a place in the England squad.

Kenny Dalglish writes about his excitement of the forthcoming season, as Liverpool face Everton in the Charity Shield at Wembley. The two sides had met earlier in the year in the League Cup Final, which Liverpool won the replay 1-0 at Maine Road, though Dalglish incorrectly says the game was at Old Trafford.

In news, West Ham are looking to replace Frank Lampard Snr with Colin Gibson from Aston Villa, Liverpool have been told that Celtic won’t sell Paul McStay to them, and Billy Bingham says he have to rethink his tactics for away games after Northern Ireland’s defeat to Finland in their opening World Cup Qualifier.

Steve Foster is this week’s “Focus On ….” subject, where he reveals he likes all music, except Boy George.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 22.12.1984

It’s Christmas 1984, and Match gets in the festive mood, with a cartoon of Bryan Robson as Santa, and Kerry Dixon, Glenn Hoddle, Ian Rush and Mark Hateley as choirboys with their uniforms in their respective club kits, while Mo Johnston is a schoolboy meeting Santa.

A double page feature asks a series of stars what their ideal Christmas would be. John O’Neill of Leicester City’s ideal Christmas is Midnight Mass, take delivery of BMW 635, take Felicity Kendall out for a spin, then head to Switzerland for a holiday. Steve McMahon also wanted to be on holiday in Switzerland.

John Barnes would like a holiday to Jamaica for Christmas, while Kevin Ratcliffe wants a Snooker table.

One person who has want they want for Christmas is Trevor Francis. Based in Italy with Sampdoria, he was planning to take advantage of Italy’s mid season break to go back to England over the holiday period, and wanting to watch a Division One game on Boxing Day.

Peter Brackley, commentator with ITV’s ‘The Big Match’ is interviewed where he reveals he supports Brighton, and that former Albion player Mark Lawrenson is “The most complete player in the country”

He also won a talent competition at Butlins when he was younger for doing impersonations.

Match gives a double page spread to a recent FA Cup 2nd Round tie between Bristol City and Bristol Rovers, which Rovers won 3-1, in front of a crowd of 20,000 – more than double any FA Cup crowd that day.

In the middle of the magazine, you could get a centre page poster of Gordon Strachan.

Clive Allen gets a Q and A. Kenny Dalglish is his favourite Football League player, while Michel Platini is his favourite foriegn player, and includes David O’Leary and Mark Lawrenson in his British XI. He also dislikes smoking and bad drivers.

Ever wondered who Clive Allen’s favourite pop star is? Christopher Cross.

In League tables, Everton, Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester United and Arsenal were seperated at the top of Division One by two points. Liverpool were 8th, 9 points off the top.

Brian McClair of Celtic got a poster, his reward for being Nike’s man of the month. Interestingly, 1984-1985 was the first season and English club wore Nike. Sunderland, since you ask.

The foreign news feature reports that Giorgio Chinaglia is planning a comeback at the age of 38, while Steve Archibald is in goalscoring for for Barcelona, and Fortuna Dusseldorf have asked their players to take a wage cut.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : NO 1 – 22.12.1984

It’s Christmas 1984, there’s no need to be afraid.

A quick look at Wikipedia tells us that No 1 was a Smash Hits type magazine which ran from 1983-1992.

There is a split cover, with John Taylor looking back on the year with Tony Hadley, and Paul Weller being interviewed by Boy Goerge. In further surrealness, Madness go skiing with the Thompson Twins, while Kim While goes partying with Nick Heyward. It is unknown if Kim Wilde and Nick Heyward’s party involved drunkenly singing on the tube.

John Taylor and Tony Hadley look back at the year, of big Number Ones (but not for their respective bands)

Highlights include :

John Taylor

(On the book, 1984) “It may be a lot closer to what is happening in Chile and Poland”

(On the Miner’s Strike) “The actual cause appears to be establish Arthur Scargill as the leader of the country”

(On Ronald Reagan) “It’s a bit better than that miserable git Mondale”

Tony Hadley

(On football) “I quite like football, but I never have the time to keep up with what’s happening”

(On Ronald Reagan) “I dislike Ronald Reagan. He thinks he’s John Wayne”

Meanwhile, Nick Heyward and Kim Wilde do a picture story of them getting ready to go on a date.

Various pop stars are given a platform for their highs and lows of 1984. Simon Le Bon’s low point was ‘Wild Boys’ not getting to Number One. I’m with him on this one, it’s Duran Duran’s best song, and should have been a Number One.

Tom Bailey, Jay Aston and Curt Smith have political issues as their low point, with Curt Smith having a similar viewpoint on Arthur Scargill as John Taylor.

Sarah from Bananarama rejoices in having a US Top Ten hit, while bemoaning stepping on dogshit in a carpark in Germany.

Paul Weller lists Ronald Reagan’s re-election as US President as his low point of 1984.

Roddy Frame is in support of the Miner’s Strike, describing it as his high point of 1984.

Tracey Ullman lists Lionel Ritchie’s video for ‘Hello’ as her 1984 low point. Time has shown it to be a classic pop video …….. in a ‘so bad it’s good’ kind of way.

Gary Glitter bemoans the lack of jobs for young people. Not going to comment on that.

No 1 readers were out voting for their favourite song of 1984, voting for ‘Careless Whisper’ by George Michael as the best song of the year. Wasn’t even the best George Michael song (Freedom by Wham since you ask, his best ever song he has recorded)

Ali and Robin Campbell get a double page spread talking about Christmas in the Campbell household. Ali Campbell’s first Christmas present that he can remember was a pair of George Best football boots.

There is an advert for music VHS including U2 Live At Red Rocks, and Now That’s What I Call Music 4.

Bucks Fizz are reviewing the recent singles, with Mike Nolan describing Band Aid as “It reminds me of that song by Greg Emerson, I mean, Greg Lake” and saying “If Queen can’t do a good Chritsmas song, I don’t think anyone can” before adding “I prefer ‘Mull Of Kintye'” in reference to Paul McCartney’s Frog Chorus.