MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.10.1986

Mark Hughes, in the early months of his first season at Barcelona, is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot.

His fellow cover star Kerry Dixon is fighting back at critics who criticised his performance in England’s recent friendly defeat against Sweden.

Dixon will be on your TV screens at the weekend as his Chelsea team take on Manchester United, with United goalkeeper wanting revenge for the previous season’s defeat to Chelsea at Old Trafford during the title run-in. The previous season’s meeting was between two teams at the top, this time around it’s between teams in the bottom half.

In news, John Wark is wanted by Hearts, Aberdeen and Norwich, while Mickey Thomas is wanted by Wichita Wings in North America.

One man who did move was Kevin Richardson, who moved from Everton to Watford, and got a phone call from Elton John welcoming him to the club, and believed it was a wind-up from his former Everton team-mates.

Everton supporters with a tenner spare could join their Fan Club, advertised in this edition.

There were plans for a testimonial for Pat Jennings before the end of 1986 at Windsor Park between an All-Star British XI to take on a European XI.

In the editor’s column, editor Peter Stewart rubbishes the idea of a proposed “Super League”, pointing to the success of smaller clubs such as Wimbledon, Oxford and Charlton.

The same column also praises Luton Town for their ban on away supporters at Kenilworth Road, as they aim to combat hooliganism.

Brian Clough tells Shoot that he doesn’t want Forest star Franz Carr to get an England call-up, because his former club Blackburn will be due a payment as part of the transfer arrangement.

Talking of England, they’ve been invited to a tournament of former World Cup winners in Brazil in 1989 to commemorate 75 years of football in Brazil. England were paired in the same group as Brazil and Uruguay.

It was a tournament that Enzo Bearzot, Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning manager, won’t be taking part in, having just resigned from his role as national team manager.

Mark Wright is on the comeback trail after an injury during Southampton’s FA Cup Semi-Final against Liverpool which ruled him out of the World Cup in Mexico. He talks to Shoot about his experiences coming back from injury.

In Glasgow, it is young players that are the talk of the town, with Shoot doing a feature on breakthrough stars Tony Shepherd (Celtic), Ian Durrant and Derek Ferguson (Rangers)

Another (relative) youngster making a mark was 32 year old Wolves manager Brian Little, who gets a double page spread in what Shoot describe as “Football’s hardest job”

Cover star Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, where he lists his favourite things. Since you ask, his favourite bands are The Jam and U2.

Also getting a double page profile are Derby County, who Shoot describe as “on the march”, and so it proved as they got promoted to Division One in 1987.

The magazine ends with Charlie Nicholas uses his column to urge Scotland fans to stand by newly appointed manager Andy Roxburgh after a disappointing start to their Euro 88 Qualifying campaign.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 1.3.1986

Celtic and Manchester United are on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot as they prepare to face each other in a mid-season friendly, with the headline “Soccer on trial”.

The headline refers to the fact that it was the first high profile away game by an English club since the previous season’s European Cup Final, which resulted in English clubs being banned from Europe.

As you open the magazine, Danny Wallace fires a message to John Barnes and Chris Waddle that he is after their World Cup place following an impressive England debut in a recent friendly away to Egypt.

The friendly at Parkhead that featured on the cover gets a double page spread, with the game billed as an unofficial British Cup Winners Cup Final, after both teams won their respective national cup competitions in 1985.

Paul McStay of Celtic suggests that a former Rangers player might have a keen interest in this game, as Scotland manager Alex Ferguson might take the opportunity to spy on Jesper Olsen of United, with Denmark being a group opponent of Scotland in the forthcoming World Cup.

In ads, you can buy The Official FA Cup Game for just £7.75 on Spectrum, Commodore or Armstrad.

Talking of adverts, England’s squad has agreed a sponsorship deal with the Health Education Council to front an anti-smoking campaign.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise Peter Beardsley, who recently made his international debut during that recent friendly in Egypt.

Northern Ireland are also in international action, with an away friendly against France, with the game getting a double page feature, with John McClelland being interviewed.

Shoot looks at the options for Scotland’s squad, and they urge Alex Ferguson to find a place for Pat Nevin in the 22.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs youngster Gordon Hunter gets praised by his manager John Blackley.

Phil Thompson is interviewed, where he states that if he could lead Sheffield United into the top flight, it would be as big a thrill as all the trophies he won with Liverpool.

Across Sheffield, Wednesday striker Carl Shutt gets a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves awards his Wally Of The Week Award to Nick Gregory from Banbury, who states that Oxford United are the best team in England.

In Spain, Terry Venables is eyeing up a move to Tottenham Hotspur, but he could be replaced at Barcelona by another British manager, John Toshack of Real Sociedad.

Andy King is interviewed where he expresses his frustration at not getting much action at Luton Town.

Jack Charlton, newly appointed Republic Of Ireland manager, has a big decision to make, as he might have to drop 30 year olds Liam Brady, Frank Stapleton and Tony Grealish.

Charlton has faced some resentment for his appointment due to not being Irish, but also shock that he got the job ahead of Bob Paisley.

Much loved referee Clive Thomas comments on the number of penalties missed in recent years, pointing the finger at his fellow referees for allowing keepers to steal yards.

Craig Levein of Hearts gets a profile as he dreams of a World Cup place, just a few years after almost quitting football to work in an Electronics Factory.

The upcoming Merseyside Derby gets a double page feature, with contributions from Peter Reid and Steve McMahon.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Channon. His favourite music is Paul McCartney, Elton John and Rod Stewart.

1986 WORLD CUP : NORTHERN IRELAND OFFICIAL SOUVENIR

In just under 24 hours time, Northern Ireland will be playing their opening match of Euro 2016, against Poland in Nice, exactly 30 years to the day (and it’s Pat Jennings birthday) since their last match in a major finals, against Brazil in the 1986 World Cup in Guadalajara.

When you’ve waited 30 years, what’s another day?

But what were Northern Ireland fans reading as they made their way to Mexico in 1986? It’s possible they were reading the official souvenir, which would have cost them £2.50, just over twice as much as the similar guide for Spain 82.

The cover star is Alan McDonald, towering over the skyline of Mexico City. Despite only playing twice in the qualifiers, McDonald became one of the icons of the campaign, after his post-match interview at Wembley where he politely suggested that anyone who thought the 0-0 draw was a fix was ever so slightly wrong.

As you open the publication, there is an advert for Belfast Telegraph, with Malcolm Brodie promising comprehensive coverage, as well as a preview supplement in the 6th May edition, and a Northern Ireland squad poster in the 10th May edition of Ireland’s Saturday Night.

IFA President Harry Cavan writes the foreward, where he states he is confident that Northern Ireland can reach the Quarter-Finals.

Ivan Little, co-editor alongside Billy Kennedy, just like in 1982, writes a double page spread on the logistics of Northern Ireland’s campaign, with one of the first tasks being for IFA Secretary David Bowen to inform FIFA that Northern Ireland wish to participate in the finals in Mexico.

Bowen also visited an Adidas factory to look at specially adapted kits to cope with the heat in Mexico, as well as ensuring the team had 10,000 bottles of water, and ensuring passports and visas were up to date.

There are full page player profiles throughout, the first being Sammy McIlroy followed by Pat Jennings. Jennings will be playing in Mexico on his 41st birthday, and comments that he spent his 21st birthday playing in Mexico, for Tottenham Hotspur in an end of season tour.

Jennings is back at White Hart Lane keeping himself in shape for Northern Ireland’s matches.

Danny Blanchflower gets a double page spread looking back at his World Cup memories, though he admits not remembering much of the 1930 tournament as he was only 4 years old. Blanchflower comments that Winter Winterbottom as England’s first manager instead of a committee inspired the IFA to do likewise with Peter Doherty, as well as suggesting that the increase of cars parked in streets as had a negative effect on the number of skillful footballers in the UK in recent decades.

There is a full page titled “The Road To Mexico”, listing the results and team line-ups of Northern Ireland’s eight qualifiers.

Jeff Powell of the Daily Mail gets a full page feature where he states that Northern Ireland are still being written off by many despite their success in recent years.

George Dunlop writes about his World Cup experience in Spain, and the daily routine of the squad, which included sports competitions on their day off with Milky Ways and Mars Bars as prizes.

Malcolm Brodie writes about Northern Ireland being happy to be based in Guadalajara, and getting a hotel 10 minutes from the airport and 15 minutes from the City Centre.

Despite not having played an international since 1977, George Best gets a profile. His involvement in this World Cup will be as a pundit for the BBC, having been one for ITV in 1982. There is also a mention of his son Calum, who has just developed an interest in football, but states that if he was to become a footballer, he could be eligible to play for England or USA instead of Northern Ireland.

There is a feature on the fans travelling to Mexico, most without tickets, such as First Shankill Supporters Club, though USA and Canada based supporters clubs are excited by the Mexican adventure, viewing them as virtually home games.

We return to player profiles, with one of Jimmy Nicholl, now Assistant to Michael O’Neill, and Norman Whiteside, who reveals that relatives send him Potato Bread and Soda Bread, which he can’t get in England, in order to make an Ulster Fry.

Whiteside also avoids talking about his love life, amid rumours he is soon to be married.

The summer of 1986 was going to be memorable for Nigel Worthington, as his wife is due to give birth to their first child at the start of July, meaning it could be touch and go for thim to make it home in time if Northern Ireland got to the final.

Worthington recalls how he discovered about his move from Ballymena United to Notts County lying in bed after a nightshift at a local factory, while revealing that he became interested in football after watching his older brother Ernie play for Coleraine.

Billy Bingham gets a double page feature by Billy Kennedy, stating he believes friendlies against France, Denmark and Morocco are perfect preparation for the World Cup.

Ian Stewart’s profile reveals that he wanted to be a popstar, forming a band in his youth, whose name was too rude to be published in this book, and performed a concert at Belvoir Community Centre.

He also reveals that he’s not to fond of playing for former Linfield player Iam McFaul, as he supports Glentoran, and writes jokes for a football magazine, using jokes about Linfield and Glentoran but changing them to Arsenal and Chelsea for an English audience.

John O’Neill states he won’t be leaving Leicester unless Liverpool or Manchester United make a bid for him, but he is hoping to be Brandywell bound to take in a Derry City match, in their first season in the League Of Ireland.

Jimmy Quinn reveals that the winning goal he scored in Romania came when he was wearing a pair of Jim Platt’s boots, having picked up the wrong pair at the Blackburn Rovers training ground before meeting up with the Northern Ireland squad.

Cover star Alan McDonald is profiled, where he declares he meant every word of his post-match interview at Wembley. He comes from a sporting family, with an older and younger brother playing for Crusaders, and another brother Jim (not that one) being a Basketball international.

McDonald took the place of John McClelland during the campaign, and it was revealed that McClelland, from Whitehead, was in the same school as the previously mentioned Jim McDonald.

Like his fellow Ballymena native Nigel Worthington, Steven Penney has a domestic arrangement scheduled this summer, with his wedding taking place two days before the final, which will be an awkward clash if Northern Ireland.

His wife is also from Ballymena, but they didn’t meet until mutual friends suggested they get together to combat loneliness in Brighton with her being a student at the local univeristy, and him playing for Albion.

There is a profile of Paul Doherty, Granada Head Of Sport, who is co-ordinating ITV’s Northern Ireland coverage, just as he did in Spain in 1982. He hitch hiked from West Germany to Sweden to watch Northern Ireland in 1958. He had good reason to, his dad was the manager, Peter Doherty.

His dad, now 72, is still active in football, working as a a Scout for Aston Villa.

Doherty is profiled as part of a feature on the media coverage. ITV will be showing the games against Algeria and Spain live, with Jackie Fullerton doing a live report on UTV’s teatime news.

If the name sounds familiar, that’s because he created Paul Doherty International, who produce commercial sporting DVDs, most notably for Manchester United.

Sadly, Paul Doherty died earlier this year.

BBC will show the final group game against Brazil, with Mike Nesbitt (Yes, the leader of the UUP) commentating on the network. That game will have BBC NI doing build-up from a studio in Belfast instead of the network coverage from London that viewers in England, Scotland and Wales will get.

Nesbitt will also be working as a reporter for BBCNI’s teatime news. Mark Robson will be doing Radio Ulster commentary on the games.

DISCLAIMER – The article says ITV broadcast the opening game of the tournament between Italy and Bulgaria. This advert suggests it was on the BBC. So it was either simulcast, changed after the publication went to press, or the article is wrong.

There is a full page feature on those hoping to make a late claim for a place in the squad, Darrin Coyle, Paul Agnew, Robbie Dennison and Bernard McNally.

Alan Snoddy gets a profile, as he aims to follow in the footsteps of Irish League referee Malcolm Moffett, who refereed Belgium v El Salvador in 1982, while Canada also get a profile, due to Terry Moore of Glentoran playing for them.

It would have been rude not to have a song, and Northern Ireland had two, with the players singing vocals on them, and comes complete with a lyrics sheet. The article suggests the songs were so good, that Duran Duran should step aside.

Northern Ireland’s three group opponents – Algeria, Spain and Brazil get a profile, as do Denmark, who they would face in a warm-up friendly, before ending on adverts for IDB (What Invest NI was known as in the 1980s) and Bushmills.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : RECORD MIRROR – 14.6.1986

It’s the summer of 1986, and Johnny Marr, lounging in a director’s chair while wearing sunglasses, is the cover star.

In news, Level 42 have announced three shows at Wembley Arena in December, while Wembley Arena also host a Reggae festival headlined by Aswad, moved from it’s original venue of Selhurst Park.

In other news, Maire Brennan was pictured at a Children In Need event with the winner of a Sade lookalike competition.

INXS get a double page feature, introduced as “There’s more to musical life down under than AC/DC, Men At Work and Rolf Harris”, as they are on the verge of worldwide superstardom, unusually for an Australian act, without having to relocate to the UK.

Midge Ure also gets a double page spread, having reformed Ultravox after having some solo success (A number one single in 1985) and declaring “I don’t want to be on stage singing ‘Vienna’ when i’m 45” – Midge Ure was 32 at the time of the interview.

In the interview, Ure praises the improved musical infrastructure in Scotland, meaning that Scottish bands no longer have to move to London to “Make it”

The live section reviews a concert by new act Erasure (though Vince Clarke was already a pop veteran) at The Town and Country Club in London, stating that they were destined for the top of the charts, even managing a few ABBA references in the review.

Six years later, Erasure had their only UK Number 1, a triple A-Side of ABBA covers.

In ads, you could buy a Nike Windrunner, with proceeds going to Sport Aid, as modeled by Frank Bruno and Cliff Richard.

The Communards get a double page spread, and Jimmy Sommerville recounts an anecdote from their lighting guy, who is also Def Leppard’s lighting guy, that they “Make Def Leppard look like nuns”

On the back page, you could get a poster of Doctor and the Medics.

MAGZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 5.7.1986

We are in the final stages of the 1986 World Cup Finals, and Shoot are covering it, having a collage of images from the tournament so far as their cover image.

Gary Lineker’s hat-trick against Poland gets the double page treatment, as all three of his goals feature in a picture collage.

In The Editor’s Page, Peter Stewart goes behind the scenes at ITV’s World Cup coverage, presented from London by Brian Moore. But there was to be a twist for Moore, as he was to fly to Mexico City to commentate on the final, his first final commentary for television (He had covered the 1966 Final for radio)

Meanwhile, the big news that week, was that Lorraine from Sunderland was setting up a Nick Pickering fan club, and provided contact details for anyone wishing to join.

In 1986, Middlesbrough were a club in crisis, and on the verge of extinction before being saved by local businessman Steve Gibson. This story gets a page of coverage.

Meanwhile, Martin Cully from Kildare writes to Jimmy Greaves Letters Page to complain about Ian Rush not being in the England squad, which gets the predictable sarcastic response from Greavsie.

Talking of Ian Rush, he does an interview where he speaks of his impending transfer to Juventus (delayed by a year due to a ban on foreign signings by Italian clubs) and how he wanted to follow-up Liverpool’s double in 1986 by winning a clean sweep of English trophies in 1987.

Liverpool didn’t win a trophy in 1987, but Rush did score a goal in a League Cup Final defeat to Arsenal.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 3.5.1986

Graeme Souness, new Player-Manager of Rangers is the cover star, as he outlines his vision for the Ibrox club.

Having just taken Barcelona to the European Cup Final, Terry Venables now has a high profile, so Shoot gives Glenn Roeder two pages to tell readers what makes Terry Venables so special.

The appointment of then 33 year old Graeme Souness as Rangers manager caused a stir. Souness tells Shoot that “Rangers rank alongside Real Madrid and Juventus. I’d say we’re a bigger club than Liverpool”

Despite proclaiming that Rangers are a bigger club, Souness admits he will be seeking advice from former Liverpool managers Bob Paisley and Joe Fagan through his time at Ibrox.

When asked about the issue of signing Catholic players, Souness says he will, which he did.

Sent-off on his debut, signing England internationals, as well as the high profile signing of Mo Johnston, as well as laying the foundations for ‘Nine In A Row’, it’s fair to say Souness time at Ibrox was eventful.

David Cameron of Surrey (surely not *that* David Cameron?) writes in to Jimmy Greaves Letter Page to say Souness would be a failure. Three titles in the Four full seasons he was at Ibrox would suggest he was wrong.

The Editorial of this week’s edition focuses on Manchester United manager Ron Atkinson, who Shoot believe should be given more time in order to bring the title to Old Trafford. Six months later, Ron Atkinson was sacked and replaced by Alex Ferguson. I think it’s fair to say, that decision worked out well.

In news, England’s World Cup squad recorded their World Cup Song ‘We’ve Got The Whole World At Our Feet

Karl Heinze Rummenigge gets a player profile where he says Rolling Stones are his favourite band, and predicts Nicola Berti will be a star of the future.

A recent Old Firm game which finished 4-4 gets a full page report, while there is an advert for Shoot’s World Cup special edition, featuring Bryan Robson, Norman Whiteside and Gordon Strachan on the cover in their national kits.

I’m guessing (just a hint) that the cover might have been shot at Manchester United’s training ground. In other ads, for just 15 quid, you could have your own Mexico 86 duvet cover.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JUNE 1986

World Cup preview edition complete with a free colour picture of the England team. Though not of Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The front cover features the Aztec Stadium in Mexico City, the venue of the final, and images of Graeme Souness, Bryan Robson and Sammy McIlroy, who captained Scotland, England and Northern Ireland at the finals.

The editorial focuses on Kenny Dalglish’s regret that he was injured and unable to play in the 1986 World Cup.

Meanwhile, Valery Lobanovsky was dramatically appointed manager of the Soviet Union after the previous manager was sacked after a run of bad results.

Lobanovsky led the Soviets to the Second Round in Mexico, and then to the final of Euro 88.

Having twice won the European Cup Winners Cup with Dynamo Kiev, he led them to the Semi-Finals of the European Cup in 1999, before his death in 2002.

Dynamo Kiev’s stadium has since been renamed in his honour.

Diego Maradona was interviewed and named England as his dream opponents should Argentina reach the final.

They had to make do with a Quarter-Final meeting of course.

The referees get a full page profile. Northern Ireland’s Alan Snoddy lists his fluent languages as English, he worked as a Bank Clerk and that his hobbies included Golf (and dreaming about giving penalties against Linfield and sending Linfield players off)

Due to print deadlines, the squads were announced after the publication date, so they had to guess the squads.

Northern Ireland’s squad includes Martin Caughey of Linfield, which was clearly a typo as the writer seems to have got Mark Caughey and Martin McGaughey mixed up.

George Dunlop, also of Linfield was also listed. He failed to make the final cut. Bizarrely, Bury’s Philip Hughes doesn’t have a date of birth listed.

Jim Platt of Coleraine was also in the Northern Ireland squad

The only other Irish League player at the 1986 World Cup was not in the Northern Ireland squad, but Canada, Terry Moore of Glentoran.

The European Cup final gets a double page spread, which is quite impressive for a 0-0 draw.

To set the scene for English readers, it begins by imagining an unknown Eastern European team has beaten Manchester United in the European Cup final at Wembley, which was strange considering United hadn’t won the league in 19 years at this point.

Brian Glanville’s column is very pessimistic about England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s World Cup chances claiming that Bobby Robson isn’t the man to lead England, and suggests that if Billy Bingham was England’s manager they would do much better.

Alex Ferguson, despite winning a European trophy with Aberdeen “has done nothing yet at international level to convince me of his qualities” despite the fact he’d only been Scotland manager for less than a year.

Glanville also responds to criticism of the 1986 World Cup being held in Mexico (and maintains that the 1970 tournament shopuldn’t have been held there either) and that the kick-off times had “Been prostituted for television”

Could be an accurate description of English football in 2011.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – DECEMBER 1986

Welcome to a new series of The Magazine Archive. Apologies that there hasn’t been one for a while.

Got a full set of 1986 editions of World Soccer at a fair in May, but wanted to get some music magazines as I didn’t want it to be all football.

Was in Manchester recently and picked up some old editions of Q, so here we go.

The first one of this new series is the December 1986 edition of World Soccer, looking back at an eventful year of football, which had a World Cup that summer.

The front cover features Diego Maradona being carried aloft while carrying the World Cup trophy, as photographers try to get a picture.

It reminded of a feature in Four Four Two ten years ago title “100 Greatest Football Pictures”, and 6 or 7 of them were of Maradona. As was written in the feature, it appears no dull pictures of Maradona exist.

Page 3 focused on the World Soccer awards with Diego Maradona, unsurprisingly, winning Footballer Of The Year, with Igor Belanov second.

Pat Jennings was 20th, possibly getting sentimental votes as he retired that year, with his final game taking place in the World Cup Finals, against Brazil ……. on his 41st birthday.

Guy Thys won Manager Of The Year award for leading Belgium to the World Cup Semi-Finals, beating competition from Valeri Lobanovsky and Kenny Dalglish.

The previous year’s winner was 15th ……….. Terry Venables.

Argentina narrowly beat European Cup Winners Cup winner Dynamo Kiev to win the Team Of The Year award which was previously held by Everton.

Despite winning a 5th successive Irish League title in 1986, Linfield were disgracefully not in the Top 20.

The magazine features a double page interview with Diego Maradona, who explains that he grew a beard earlier in the year because his sister wondered what he looked like with a beard.

The other World Cup Final in 1986, the club version got a double page spread, with the writers casting Steau Bucharest in the role of underdogs against River Plate, which turned out to be correct.

The main story in English football got a double page spread as Ron Atkinson was sacked as Manchester United and replace by Aberdeen’s Alex Ferguson.

Ferguson was given a contract until 1990 and a brief to win the title, something which United hadn’t done for 19 years, and given their start to the 1986-1987 season, the wait would extend until 21 years at least.

“United aren’t the only victims of this unpredictable season. Below them are three other once famous and mighty clubs – Chelsea, Manchester City and Newcastle United”

Ironic, that those four clubs now sit at the top of English football when Ferguson celebrated his 25th anniversary in charge of United.

Meanwhile, bizarrely, police entered the pitch at Fratton Park to tell off two players for swearing at the ref.

Meanwhile, in Glasgow, an Old Firm derby match “ended in mayhem” as Celtic have seven players booked and Mo Johnston sent-off in a Skol Cup final defeat to Rangers.

Celtic manager Davie Hay was so angry after the game, he suggested that Celtic should apply to join England’s top flight.

Meanwhile, ten games into the 1986-1987 had Glentoran and Larne joint top, with Portadown second bottom.

That month, Portadown appointed Ronnie McFall as manager, and their fortunes went on an upward trajectory.