MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.8.1989

It’s the kick-off of the 1989-1990 season, and Shoot’s famous League Ladders poster, which came free with this edition, is the cover image.

The magazine opens with Bryan Robson’s column, where is confident that Manchester United can win the title, and believes his side are ready to show their credentials against reigning champions Arsenal on the opening day of the season.

He also touches on the World Cup in Italy, coming up at the end of the season, predicting that it will be won by a European team and that England aren’t far off.

Shoot itself gets a feature. The reason for the trumpet blowing? Shoot had just celebrated it’s 20th anniversary.

Real Madrid have signed a young player, but in tragic circumstances, symbolically signing one year old Sergio Cunningham, after the death of his dad, former Real Madrid player Lawrie Cunningham.

Terry Butcher showed off his drumming skills in Stirling recently for the band Tonto. Shoot describes Butcher as a self confessed head banger who lists Iron Maiden as his favourite band.

Theo Snelders tells Shoot of his determination to get back into the Holland squad after being controversially dropped after the manager said he was too scared to play against Germany.

John Fashanu has just joined Shoot and uses his debut column to put an end to rumours that he wants to leave Wimbledon.

In posters, you can get one of new Everton signing Norman Whiteside, while Gazza advertises Brooks boots.

Graham Roberts uses his column to reveal the reason why he left Rangers to join Chelsea – a dressing room falling out with manager Graeme Souness.

In news, The Football League is negotiating for the use of Wembley Stadium for the Play-Off Finals.

John Robertson tells Shoot that he is glad to have rejoined Hearts from Newcastle United, believing it will be a boost to his chances of going to the World Cup if Scotland qualify.

Shoot isn’t the only one celebrating a milestone birthday, Match of the Day turns 25 and gets a full page feature.

Jimmy Greaves predicts how he things the league table will look in 1990, predicting Liverpool to take the title back from Arsenal, with Charlton, Luton and Southampton getting relegated.

Jan Molby gets a full page interview, telling Shoot he is desperate to become a regular starter for Liverpool again, and win back his place in Denmark’s squad.

Kevin Gallacher gets a double page profile, where he reveals Deacon Blue are one of his favourite bands, and met Ricky Ross at a concert for Paul Sturrock’s testimonial, and that Ross was more nervoud of meeting Dundee united players than they were of meeting him.

There is a full page feature on Gerry Francis, who is remaining loyal to Bristol Rovers despite financial troubles at the club, but warns they won’t have any success in the future unless they get a new stadium, with the club playing at Twerton Park in Bath.

Ray Wilkins has just rejoined Rangers, and has hit back at suggestions that English players who join the Ibrox club (Wilkins was the 13th to do so under Graeme Souness) are jeopardising their international career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 1.7.1989

Gary Lineker is the cover star of Match, as he makes a return to England after three years in Barcelona, signing for Tottenham Hotspur.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on the transfer, with Lineker turning down moves to Everton and Monaco when deciding to sign for Spurs. There is also a mock diary, done in the style of Adrian Mole’s diary.

There is a double page feature on another England striker, Steve Bull, who scored more hat-tricks (four) than any other player in English football in 1988-1989.

Strikers were very much a theme of this issue, with a full page profile of Everton’s new signing Mike Newell, who has a point to prove after being rejected by Liverpool as a youngster.

A Striker who isn’t moving anywhere is Brian McClair, who uses his column to deny he will be returning to Celtic, as well as praising Manchester United’s signings of Neil Webb and Mike Phelan.

In international news, Ruud Gullit and Frank Rijkaard avoided a fatal plane crash when they were refused permission by AC Milan to appear in an exhibition game in Surinam. The plane taking the players playing in the game crashed.

Karl-Heize Rummenigge announced his retirement, while AC Milan want to sign Gianluca Vialli. Juventus have also made a signing, 11 year old Fabio Alderucci.

There is a double page feature on players not leaving Old Firm clubs, with Ally McCoist staying at Rangers despite interest from Arsenal, Everton and Atalanta, and Chris Morris turning down QPR and Leeds to stay at Celtic.

There is a full page feature on the sides with the worst discipline in England and Scotland, Portsmouth being the “winners” with seven red cards.

Match’s Player Of The Year vote saw what was described as a “50s revival”, with most of the winners being veterans born in the 1950s.

In ads, Ian Rush is advertising Nike, putting snooker chalk on his boot.

Gary Waddock, now playing for Charleroi in Belgium, tells Match of his dream of playing for Republic of Ireland at the 1990 World Cup in Italy, just two years after retiring through injury.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 23.12.1989

Clive Allen is the cover star of Match’s 1989 Christmas issue, as one decade ends and a new one is set to begin.

Mark Bright, Teddy Sheringham, Gary Mabbutt and Steve Ogrizovic are asked what they want for Christmas, with Mabbutt revealing he would like to spend Christmas Night with Michelle Pfeiffer.

Kerry Dixon does a double page interview with Match, where he reveals he is concentrating on Chelsea, and has given up hope of an England recall.

There is a poster of Bryan Robson’s recent goal for England against Yugoslavia, the fastest ever at Wembley, coming just 38 seconds into the game.

Match then dedicates a page to a statistical analysis of the clubs with the best defences in the English league.

Clive Allen gets a double page profile, where he reveals his favourite singers are Billy Joel and Phil Collins.

It wouldn’t be Christmas without bad presents, and Match canvasses various footballers for what their worst present is.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SMASH HITS – 19.4.1989

Wendy James of Transvision Vamp is the cover star of Smash Hits, having broken into the charts during 1989.

As you open the magazine, there is a poster of Fleetwood Mac and Rolling Stones haters The Reynolds Girls.

Smash Hits asks various pop stars if they are O-Zone friendly. Simon Le Bon states that the situation is “Bloody frightening”.

A Spokesperson for Prince Charles says he has given up using O-Zone damaging products.

Jim Kerr of Simple Minds will be hosting a show on Radio 1 about ecological concerns. There is also a cut out letter to send to lobby the Minister for the Environment.

Nathan Moore of Brother Beyond is subject to a questionnaire asking if he is a thug or a weed, with the result putting him in the middle.

There was a token for readers to get free badges – Kylie Minogue, Yazz, Rick Astley and Michael Jackson.

Smash Hits previews Madonna’s new album with a poster and an interview. The interview isn’t with Madonna, but the Songwriters she worked with on the album.

As well as hosting a show on Radio 1, Jim Kerr and his band Simple Minds have a new single out, This Is You Land, which gets the Lyrics Poster treatment.

Cover star Wendy James gets a two page interview, with the headline asking if she is the new Kylie Minogue, revealing that she was suspended from school for knocking over chairs in assembley.

Holly Johnson is the Singles Reviewer, wanting to sit on the fence for songs he doesn’t like such as Texas, Kylie Minogue and Cher. He awarded Best Single to I’m Every Woman by Chaka Khan.

There is a feature on Duran Duran, as they try to regain their status as biggest band in the world.

The magazine ends with a poster of The Bangles.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 5.8.1989

Paul McGrath, in action for Republic Of Ireland, is the cover star, as Match leads with the headline “FORCED OUT!”, with McGrath having just left Manchester United for Aston Villa.

As you open the magazine, there is an interview with McGrath, who tells Match that Manchester United’s search for a Central Defender left him with no option but to sign for Aston Villa, almost a year after a move to Tottenham Hotspur broke down.

When you turn over the page, there is an interview with Norman Whiteside, who feels his move to Goodison Park will help his ambition of winning a league title.

With a new season about to start in Scotland, Mo Johnston tells Match he wants to win over the Rangers fans, having previously played for Celtic, adding that he is confident of Rangers making an impression in the European Cup, despite being drawn against Bayern Munich in the group stages.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs goalkeeper Andy Goram has received a dressing down for leaving Hibs pre-season training to play international Cricket for Scotland.

Arsenal will be playing Independiente in a friendly in Miami, which will be broadcast live on ITV that weekend.

Another English club on tour in 1989 were Ipswich Town, becoming the first English club to tour the Soviet Union.

Division Four gets previewed, with both Ian Muir of Tranmere and Tony Grealish of Rotherham expecting Scunthorpe United to win the division in 1990. They finished 11th.

In ads, John Barnes and Graeme Souness were advertising Diadora, while Jennifer Saunders was advertising Nat West.

Match’s cut out A-Z Fixture Lists for English clubs this week cover P to S

Mick Quinn has just signed for Newcastle, but tells Match of his frustration at being priced out of a move to a top flight club due to Portsmouth’s valuation of him.

Neil Webb advertises Nike, and Chris Waddle tells Match he is enjoying life at Marseille.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.12.1989

Peter Beardsley, playing for England, is the cover star of Match, as England, Scotland and Republic Of Ireland have discovered their group opponents in the 1990 World Cup.

1989-1990 has been a season of violence on the pitch in English football, with Sports Minister Colin Moynihan calling for players who misbehave to be arrested. Bryan Robson and Terry Butcher hit back against such a suggestion.

England and Republic Of Ireland face each other in the 1990 World Cup groups, having met in Euro 88, while Scotland also face familiar opponents, Brazil, who they met in the 1982 World Cup group stages.

Gary Shaw, currently playing in Austria, is hoping to return to the Football League, but is still struggling from the effects of a knee injury.

Ajax are eyeing up English clubs for potential friendlies as they are currently serving a UEFA ban.

One English club playing a high profile friendly is Arsenal, who travel to Ibrox to take on Rangers in an Unofficial British Championship, with Arsenal midfielder Brian Marwood saying this match is an opportunity to enhance Arsenal’s reputation.

There is a feature on competition winners who got to meet the England team.

John MacPhail of Sunderland tells Shoot he still has the legs to take part in Sunderland’s promotion battle at the age of 34.

Talking on veterans, there is a full page profile of QPR’s midfield duo of Ray Wilkins and Peter Reid, both well into their 30s.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 15.4.1989

Nottingham Forest are the cover stars of this week’s edition of Match, having won the League Cup. They’re in cup action this week in the FA Cup, facing Liverpool in the Semi-Finals, a match that would sadly be remembered for the tragic events that happened in the Leppings Lane terraces.

That match got a double page preview, with Match columnist Emlyn Hughes predicting a 2-1 win for Liverpool. For the record, when the match was rearranged, Liverpool won 3-1.

Hughes also previews the other Semi-final between Everton and Norwich, predicting a 2-0 win for Everton. Everton won the game 1-0.

It’s also the Scottish Cup Semi-Finals, with Hibs facing Celtic. Hibs new signing Keith Houchen has cup pedigree, albeit in England, where he scored for Coventry in the FA Cup Final just two years earlier..

Celtic had just returned from Dubai, where they faced Liverpool in an unofficial British Championship, as both sides were defending champions, and Match does a joint interview with Andy Walker and Steve McMahon.

For the record, Celtic won that match on penalties after a 1-1 draw.

In ads, you could buy VHS tapes of League Cup Finals over the previous 15 years for just £9.99

Battling it out for the FA Cup, Everton have already won one trophy, with Match voting them Programme Of The Year.

Nottingham Forest’s win over Luton in the League Cup Final gets a double page spread, as well as a double sided poster.

Stuart Munro gets a profile, being a regular in the Rangers team despite being linked with moves for Tony Dorigo, Stuart Pearce and Colin Gibson.

On the verge of promotion to Division One, Chelsea get a full page profile, and interview with Clive Wilson.

As well as winning the League Cup, Nottingham Forest win another trophy, as Match gives them an award for having the best disciplinary record in English football.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : NUMBER ONE – 2.8.1989

It’s the summer of 1989, and a jumping Lenny Henry is the cover star of Number One.

In chart news, the “What’s Up” column has Sybil, River Detectives, Lil Louis, Doobie Brothers and Martika as their featured singles.

There is a double pages feature on Stock Aitken Waterman, and their views of the current hit parade.

They started their own label as nobody else would give them a job, despite providing CBS with a Number 1 for Dear Or Alive in 1985.

Waterman is on the warpath describing The Smiths, U2 and Clannad as “The Perry Como and Al Martino of the 1980s”, adding “U2 and The Smiths are boring and old fashioned. Kids today see it as their brother’s music”

Bono gets even more ire, with Waterman describing him as “Bono’s old. He’s got long hair. He’s scruffy”

It’s not just Bono, Waterman also has it in for Acid House, describing it as “The acid house thing …. it’s just a trendy thing, not working class Britain. It’s middle class university students who’ve got £15 to go to the acid house gig and £30 to buy the ecstacy”

Waterman then compares S/A/W to Elvis and Little Richard, and says they are the Liverpool FC of pop, as they work to a winning forumla.

In news, Lenny Henry is about to launch a pop career, albeit in the guise of one of his characters, Theophilius P Wilderbeest. Deacon Blue have announced a tour for December 1989, which begins at King’s Hall in Belfast.

On TV that week, Kylie was on Wogan, Channel 4 had a documentary on Yazz, and BBC 1 has a concert for Stevie Wonder’s birthday.

The Primitives get a full page interview, mostly focusing on what annoys them.

In adverts, tickets for Bros at Wembley were advertised, with support coming from Debbie Gibson and Salt N Pepa, with DJ sets from Simon Mayo and Pat Sharp.

Tony James from Transvision Vamp, Trev and Simon, Roland Gift from Fine Young Cannibals and Paula Abdul take part in Genius Of Pop, Number One’s quiz, with Trev and Simion winning with 6 out of 10.

In the centre pages, yout could get a lyrics poster of Kylie Minogue’s new single, Wouldn’t Change A Thing.

Milli Vanilli get a double page Q and A with Number One. I couldn’t possibly comment if it was Frank Farian answering the questions for them.

Cover star Lenny Henry gets a double page interview, in the guise of his characters Theophilus Wildebeest and Delbert Wilkins.

There is a full page review of the recent Prince’s Trust Concert. Beside it, is Bruno Brooks Radio 1 Roadshow Diary.

A few pages later, there is a half page interview with Eartha Kitt, who is releasing a single recorded with Bronski Beat.

Singles are reviewed by Shirley Manson, future Garbage singer, then fronting Goodbye Mr Mackenzie. Her favourite single that week was Stand by REM.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – FEBRUARY 1989

Lou Reed and Simply Red, are the co-cover stars, as Q looks ahead to the final year of the 1980s.

But first, who feels Q’s wrath this month? Sunday Sport, since you ask, the subject of their “What the hell does ……..” column.

Q does a three page feature on Viz, an unlikely success in recent years, as well as an emerging talent in the world of Blues, Jeff Healey.

There is a full page tribute to Roy Orbison, who died in December 1988.

In news, Billy Idol appeared at a charity gig, doing an acoustic set, while Simple Minds announced the release of a new single called “Belfast Children”

Not sure if it was an error by Q, or a late change, but it was eventually released as “Belfast Child”, and became Simple Minds only UK Number 1.

Mark Knopfler got 5,900 spoilt vites in the recent US Presidential Election.

In letters, Q got correspondence asking what both The Buzzcocks and Cat Stevens were up to these days.

Lou Reed gets five pages, giving a rare interview, where he defends himself for doing an advert for American Express.

Mick Hucknall is interviewed, laughing at a Daily Mirror story claiming he was to become a hermit, living in Milan with a 500 sq ft kitchen.

Between recording in Spain and living in Italy, Hucknall hasn’t seen much of his home city of Manchester lately, defending it’s reputation, saying “I never get hassled in Manchester. Northerners aren’t like that”

One thing that Manchester has over Milan is Indian restaurants, “There isn’t an Indian restaurant in Milan, which I find incredible”, moans Hucknall.

Q does a feature on “Songwriters For Hire” and what they do, focusing on the main hitmakers (still working to this day) such as Albert Hammond (Dad of Albert Hammond Jr from The Strokes) and Diane Warren.

Q makes their predictions for who’ll be big in 1989, predicting big things for Guns n Roses and Londonbeat.