MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1991

Bryan Robson, in action against Notts County, is the cover star, with the headline “Robbo’s Back”, as he is interviewed in this edition.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on Wales European Championship Qualifier in Germany, where Wales need a draw to virtually qualify for the finals in Sweden.

Jimmy Greaves assesses the two teams and predicts a win for Germany, and so it proved, with Germany winning 4-1.

Bryan Robson’s interview is part of Shoot’s preview of England’s European Championship Qualifier against Turkey. Turkey had been good opponents for Robson, with 5 goals in his 3 previous appearances against them.

England’s previous game against Turkey saw Robson left out of the squad, and he thought his international career was over at the age of 34, but his recent form for Manchester United saw him earn a recall.

As it turned out, the game against Turkey was Robson’s last cap for England.

Another player making an England comeback was Stuart Pearce, who explains that he was left out of the squad for the recent friendly against Germany as he was serving a domestic suspension.

Elsewhere in the group, Republic Of Ireland face a crunch game in Poland, and Shoot interviews Mick McCarthy in preparation of this.

In news, Charlie Nicholas had all his medals stolen after a burglary at his house, while Celtic have had a bid rejected for Terry Phelan, while Chelsea are planning a move to sign Matt Le Tissier.

Also in Scotland, John Robertson of Hearts gets a double page interview where he says that Hearts are determined to bounce back after defeat against Celtic, their first of the season. Robertson also gives Shoot the lowdown on his Hearts team-mates.

Peter Ndlovu of Coventry City gets interviewed s he adjusts to life in England, telling Shoot that he mostly listens to the radio and watched TV.

Also adjusting to life in a new country is David Platt, who tells Shoot he is enjoying life in Italy, despite Bari not winning a game and their manager resigning.

Talking of English players in Italy, former AC Milan striker Mark Hately rubbishes former Bari striker Paul Rideout’s claim that no English striker has come back from Italy a better player.

I wonder did they discuss the matter a few months later in the dressing room when Rideout signed for Rangers?

Talking of Rangers, a reader writes to Jimmy Greaves to say that Rangers will continue to be minnows on a European stage due to a lack of competition in Scotland, while another reader asks about the possibility of Leeds winning the league, and Greaves says they need Lee Chapman to start scoring in order for that to happen.

In competitions, you could win a pair of Quaser boots, and get to meet Gary Lineker, Matt Le Tisser or Charlie Nicholas at one of their respective team’s home games.

Tony Cottee gets a profile, revealing that if he wasn’t a footballer, he would be a Fireman, or work for his dad as an Insurance Broker.

In ads, there was an advert for a teen mag called Look-In (possibly an IPC publication, I can’t verify) which had Rik Mayall as it’s cover star, talking about his role in Drop Dead Fred.

Alongside that, is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which comes with free Pro Set cards.

The magazine ends with a double page feature on Scotland’s European Championship Qualifier in Bucharest where a win would virtually guarantee qualification to the finals.

They lost, but other results went their way which meant they made it to Sweden.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – MARCH 1991

Queen, having just released their latest album Innuendo, are the cover stars of Q, in the early months of a year that would see the death of their lead singer Freddie Mercury.

Tom Jones feels the wrath of Q in their monthly “Who the hell does …….” column.

In news, Stone Roses are in Wales, working on an album they hoped to release that Autumn. It was slightly delayed …….. until December 1994.

Q does a four page feature on the work of Showbiz journalists at The Sun, Daily Mirror and Daily Star. You may recognise The Sun’s man, a young Piers Morgan, who boasts that he earns as much money as the Prime Minister.

Queen get a five page feature, mainly an interview with Brian May, covering the furore over their appearance at Sun City, with May defending the band’s appearance “The audience was mixed, as was our hotel. We were able to speak against Apartheid in interviews and play with black musicians in Soweto”

May also spoke about their post Live Aid revival, their decline in America, and Ice Ice Baby, which featured a sample of Under Pressure, which May thought wouldn’t sell as he thought it was crap.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SELECT – DECEMBER 1991

Lenny Kravitz is the cover star of Select, as 1991 comes to an end.

A trend at that time was sampling. Just as trendy, was suing over sampling, so Select made a handy chart of ongoing sampling related court cases that were currently live.

In news, Pet Shop Boys raised £20,000 after doing a benefit gig at Heaven in London for St Mary’s Hospital HIV Unit. In the crowd was Sandie Shaw, Carter USM and James and Ian from EMF.

At time of press, Izzy Stradlin was still a member of Guns n Roses, amid rumours of his departure.

Prizes on offer in competitions include am REM video and posters, and a Cocteau Twins boxset.

Reviews included The Cranberries at The Parkway in Limerick, written by Graham Linehan, who went on to create Father Ted.

The Black Crowes get a three page feature, with singer Chris Robinson taking exception to Rod Stewart comparisons, and stereotypes because he comes from the Deep South.

Also getting three pages, is cover star Lenny Kravitz.

In reviews, INXS have a live album out, which gets 4 stars (out of 5) with the reviewer labelling them “The acceptable face of Stadium Rock”

John Peel, due to celebrate 25 years at Radio 1 in 1992, gets four pages about his career, as he prepares to release a series of Peel Sessions compilations.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9th NOVEMBER 1991

With the publishing date being the 2nd anniversary of the collapse of the Berlin Wall, it is quite apt the the front cover proclaims another once unstoppable force of the 70s and 80s to be on the verge of collapse, suggesting that Liverpool’s era of domination could be coming to an end.

A double page spread is dedicated to this suggestion, with the writer hinting that Kenny Dalglish saw it coming and wanted to get out with his reputation intact, highlighting high profile defeats to Arsenal (1989 title decider) and Crystal Palace (1990 FA Cup Semi-Final) as evidence of this.

In 1991, such a suggestion would have been laughed at as Liverpool going throught a blip, and that they will be adding to their 18 titles in the 1992/1993 season and beyond.

20 years on, with Liverpool still on 18 titles (and since overtaken by Manchester United), it appears the writer of the article was correct.

There is a poster of Andrei Kanchelskis and of Hibs winning the Skol Cup (That’s Scottish Communities Cup in modern currency)

This week also sees a competition to win videos of classic World Cup matches such as West Germany v France (1982) France v Brazil (1986) and England v West Germany (1990)

Meanwhile, there is a full page advert for Pro Set cards, remember them?

In rumours which look silly now, Leeds want to sign Brian McClair, Vinny Jones wants to play for the Republic Of Ireland, and George Best is to join St Patrick’s Athletic as an advisor.

In actual news, St Johnstone have signed Soviet Union international Sergei Baltacha.

In case you’re wondering, yes, it is Elena Baltacha’s dad.

Warren Barton is featured in a player profile, who disappointingly isn’t asked for his favourite music, so we don’t know if he’s a stereotypical Phil Collins loving footballer.

Warren, 22, is single and lives in a flat in Bethnal Green. He drives a Saab 900I and is keen on Tennis and Golf.

Bet the women are just queing up.

Warrend hates Australian soaps (and Kerry Bishop in particular), is a big fan of Robert De Niro and Julia Roberts, and thinks Lawrie Sanchez is the most boring person at Wimbledon.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JANUARY 1991

The latest in the series looking back at magazines from the past takes us to the January 1991 edition of Q, featuring INXS on the cover and looking back at the 50 best albums of 1990.

Randomly, the logo is in silver, and looking at the collage of back issues in the magazine (Aimed at selling back issues to those who missed it), it seems to change colour on a monthly basis, rather than the red with a white Q we all know.

The Spine Line simply reads “Ugly Rumours”

Everybody knows that Ugly Rumours was the name of a band in the early 1970s fronted by aspiring singer Tony Blair, but in 1990, he was Shadow Secretary of State for Employment, so it obviously isn’t a reference to him.

Q reader Ed Jenkins curiosity caused him to write in wondering whatever happened to The Small Faces, and Q obliged, filling him in with what they were up to.

Singer Steve Marriott died in a house fire in April 1991. By the end of the decade, bandmate Ronnie Lane would also be dead.

An advert for Our Price promoted some of the pick of albums out this year include an album by Prefab Sprout, them of the Hot Dog and Elvis fame with their album “Jordan : The Comeback”, which would have a totally different meaning in 2010.

Fans of classic Our Price adverts would be advised to check out this TV promo for OMD’s Best Of album, from 1988.

Ringo Starr, narrator of Thomas The Tank Engine and The Simpsons guest star, got a triple page spread for his music career, looking back on the US tour he had just done.

Six pages are dedicated to the Top 50 Albums Of 1990, with the Mancunian owner before me ticking and question marking albums on the list based on his tastes.

Concert fans in late 1990 were spolit for choice as Eric Clapton, Del Amitri, Dr Feelgood, Gary Glitter, Cliff Richard and Status Quo were all out on tour, though not together.

The reviews section had a sub section dedicated to videos, remember them, with the main focus being on Madonna’s “Ultimate Collection”.

Sharing a page with her on the opening page of the video section is “The Gary Glitter Story”, where reviwer Colin Shearman claims “Gary Glitter’s no longer a mere rock star, he’s now a Greeat British institution, standing somewhere between Paul McCartney and The Queen Mum”.

If only he knew.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10th AUGUST 1991

The second in a series of old magazines looks at Shoot from 10th August 1991, building up to the start of the 1991-1992 season.

They didn’t know it at the time, but English football was about to change forever, the seeds of this change would be found in the magazine.

The cover star is Dean Saunders, who recently joined Liverpool from Derby County for a (meagre by today’s standards) British record £2.9m in a joint transfer with Mark Wright, who cost £2.3m

Saunders was signed by new Liverpool manager Graeme Souness with the aim of helping Liverpool win the league title for the first time since 1990, a phrase which has been used every summer since then, but didn’t sound so bad in 1991.

The previous most expensive footballer in Britain was Gary Pallister at £2.3m, but the record changed hands on an annual basis between 1991 and 1996 with Alan Shearer, Roy Keane, Duncan Ferguson, Chris Sutton, Andy Cole and Stan Collymore all holding the record, before Alan Shearer once again broke the record with his £15m transfer from Blackburn Rovers to Newcastle United in 1996.

Pages 4 and 5 had a preview of the forthcoming season in English football’s top two divisions (I’m guessing Divisions Three and Four were done the week previously, as well as Scotland) in a race horsing them, rather randomly.

They predicted that defending champions Arsenal would retain their trophy (They finished a distant 4th).

They did correctly predict that Manchester United would finish runners-up.

To their credit, they did predict that Leeds United, who won the league that season would be “In with a shout”

Of the three clubs who were promoted from Division Two, they predicted that Blackburn Rovers (No Kenny Dalglish or Jack Walker at the club at this point) and Middlesbrough would reach the play-offs but eventual champions Ipswich Town were “One paced to say the least”

An article on the following page titled “Soccer in The Dock” looks at a High Court appeal by the Football League against the FA’s plans to launch a breakaway Premier League in 1992.

As everybody knows, this breakaway league was launched in August 1992, and England is now home to the “Greatest League In The World” …….. albiet, a pop band from Sheffield.

Page 8 has a page dedicated to all the new transfers which had happened in the previous week (with a picture of Mark Wright in friendly action against Dundalk)

With two players out (including David Platt) and five players in (including Kevin Richardson, Ugo Ehiogu and Les Sealey), Aston Villa were the most active club in the transfer market, and this was featured in a double page spread later in the magazine, focusing on Villa, about to enter their first season under new manager Ron “Big Ron” Atkinson, just nine years after being European Champions.

In his second season at the club, Atkinson led Villa to 2nd in the inagural season of the Premier League, but did win the League Cup in his third season.

Atkinson didn’t get a fourth season, having found out why Doug Ellis was known as “Deadly Doug” in November 1994, just six months after the League Cup win at Wembley, Villa’s first trophy since winning the 1982 European Cup.

A youngish and relatively unknown Neil Warnock gets a double page spread, as he prepared for his first season as a top-flight manager, having led Notts County to promotion via the play-offs at Wembley.

In terms of bizarre adverts, Sondico deserve an award for getting Bryan Robson, Gary Lineker and Ian Rush to dress up as mafioso to pormote shinguards. As you do.

Meanwhile, Tottenham Hotspur took out a double page advert aimed at promoting their latest range of merchandise, including various “FA Cup Winners 1991” T-shirts.

Steve Bould appears in an advert endorsing Arrow boots with the headline “A BOULD DECISION”

In 1991, all the cool kids at school wore Steve Bould boots, except for me and my pair of Jeff Spiers Specials.

In house advertising for the following week’s publication focused on Team Tabs.

If you don’t know what Team Tabs are, you’ve never lived.

Basically, they were tabs representing each team in the top four divisions in England and top two in Scotland (No Irish League ones though, and the League Of Wales was yet to be formed) that you placed in their league position through a specially cut hole.

I was actually a reader of Match in my youth, and would have only ever bought Shoot whenever there was something free.

I would have usually bought it during the summer for Team Tabs, but after getting the clubs into their places on the first Saturday of the season, i’d usually just give up, mainly due to the thought of doing it every Saturday teatime for the next nine months.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – SEPTEMBER 1991

Something i’ve been meaning to do but am only getting the chance to do over Christmas, is upload and review some old magazines i’ve got.

This batch of magazines, I got at Empire Exchange when I was in Manchester in February.

If you’ve never been to Manchester or Empire Exchange, I can’t recommend it highliy enough. Basically, it’s a second hand shop specialising in literally everything.

Had a wee browse in their magazine section, and picked up a couple of ones that caught my eye.

I’d decided to make use of the time off over Christmas by scanning (I don’t have a scanner in the house, so made use of the facilities in Newtonbreda Library) and upload a few of my favourite articles.

The first magazine is Q from September 1991 with the headline “Who’s Cracked It In 1991?” with a collage of images of Milltown Brothers, Mariah Carey, Mock Turtles, Omar, Chris Issak, EMF, Seal, Beverley Craven, James and Massive Attack.

The Spine Line, for those who are interested, reads, “Bore-dom, bore-dum! Ba-dum! ba-dum”

For those unaware of the concept, magazines have what is known as a Spine Line, where a random phrase, or statement is printed, which bears a reference to what is in the publication.

“Bore-dum, bore-dum! ba-dum! ba-dum!” refers to the song “Boredum” by The Buzzcoks, who were featured in the magazine. As a bonus fact, the song was referenced in “Rip It Up” by Orange Juice, in the line “And my favourite song’s entitled boredum”

A double page feature on James kicks-off the section dedicated to the cover stars titled “1991 : Life Is Sweet”, profiling their ten year journey to the top of the charts, having enjoyed their biggest hit (and still biggest hit to date) earlier in the year with “Sit Down“.

Interestingly, only James, Chris Issak and Milltown Brothers got double page spreads, while the rest had to make do with a mere single page.

Answers on a postcard please if anyone knows who Milltown Brothers are, and what they are doing now.

Mock Turtles, then on the crest of a wave after their hit “Can U Dig It?” were featured, during that brief moment in time when singer Martin Coogan was more famous than his brother Steve.

That month, Q was recommending albums by Crowded House, Dexy’s Midnight Runners, The Jam, Electronic and Tom Petty, so they did know their stuff.

Depressingly, the Number One album at time of press was “Love Hurts” by Cher, keeping The Jam’s Greatest Hits compliation off the top.

Interestingly, Beverley Craven at Number Ten was the highest placed artist under 30 (at the time) in the album chart.

Concert goers (according to the listing page) could have taken in tours by All About Eve, Gary Glitter, Chesney Hawkes, Kylie Minogue, NKOTB and Chris Rea, amongst others.

Meanwhile, an advertorial towards the end of the magazine for the CD-I which “Will cram sound, text, graphics and video to your Compact Disc”

The feature was written by Q journalist John Bauldie. My older brother used to always buy Q during the mid 1990s, and I do happen to remember the edition which featured Bauldie’s obituary, as he was a fellow passenger on the plane crash that killed then Chelsea Vice-Chairman Matthew Harding.