MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SELECT – MAY 1992

Bono is the cover star of this edition of Select, an edition which goes on tour with U2.

In news, 1992 is going to be a busy year for Madonna, as she will release an erotic book, a new album, and star in a film.

Select spends eight days with Paul Heaton of The Beautiful South, a period which covers an Irish Awards Ceremony, and a trip to Italy to see Juventus, where his taxi driver helped him buy a ticket from a tout for “a reasonable price”

Boo Radleys get a double page feature, which reveals that Tim Brown, their Bassist, lives in Stuart Sutcliffe (original Bassist in The Beatles) old house.

Therapy?, The Sugarcubes, Lou Reed, Soundgarden and Ride get concert reviews in this edition.

Carter USM hold a press conference to address the state of the nation, and aren’t particularly complimentary to Lush or Ride.

Cover stars U2 get six pages as Select joins them on tour in America.

That is followed by four pages of The Cure, after they have launched a comeback.

In reviews, Jesus and Mary Chain have a new album out, which gets awarded five out of five, while Lightning Seeds new album gets two out of five.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SMASH HITS – 25.11.1992

Mark and Gary from Take That are the cover stars of Smash Hits, as the magazine joins them on tour.

Right Said Fred are interviewed, with Rob (the one with the hair) revealing that he smokes a lot and fancies Betty Boo.

Cover stars Take That get four pages of coverage on tour.

There is a Home Alone sequel out this week, and Smash Hits looks at the similarities between the two films.

Voting is underway in the Smash Hits Readers Poll, and celebs are asked how they voted, with Dominik Diamond voting a lot for Manic Street Preachers and voted his Gamesmaster colleague Patrick Moore for Best Haircut.

In Singles Reviews, Single Of The Week gets given to a re-release of Pretty Vacant by Sex Pistols.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – SEPTEMBER 1992

Steve McManaman is mocked up as a superhero called McMana Man for the cover image, as he is described as English football’s superhero for the 1990s.

Ian Wright is interviewed and has modest ambitions for 92/93 – to get in the England team and to win the Premier League and FA Cup with Arsenal, predicting that he can make the most of the new backpass rule which stops goalkeepers picking the ball up from a backpass.

Steve McManaman is the subject of a double page feature, predicting he will become Liverpool’s greatest ever player, as well as tributes from the likes of Alan Hansen, Bruce Grobbelaar and Bradley Allen.

Don Howe is the subject of a profile, having just joined Chelsea as a coach, and his happy to be in that role rather than being a manager.

In world news, Marseille’s new signing Rudi Voeller believes that he can score the goals to win the European Cup for the French club.

Meanwhile, Manchester United have rejected a bid from Derby County to sign Bryan Robson, with the Rams hoping he would have had the same effect on them in the 90s as a similarly aged Dave Mackay did in the 1970s.

The forthcoming Premier League season is previewed, with all the Football Monthly journalists predicting that Arsenal will be champions in 1993.

Leeds United get a four page profile as they get set to defend their league title, looking at their success over the past four years under Howard Wilkinson.

The new Non League season is previewed, with Wycombe Wanderers being predicted to win promotion to the Football League.

Manchester City manager Peter Reid is interviewed, stating he stands by all his decisions, with City hoping to launch a title bid having come 5th in 1992.

In Scotland, the return of Trevor Steven to Rangers makes them favourites to win the title in 1993.

In competitions, you could win with Hummel, but you had a choice of a pair of boots or a replica shirt of either Benfica, Denmark or Real Madrid.

The preview of the new Irish League season predicts Glentoran to pip Linfield to the title and Ards to win the Irish Cup. Ards lost the Final while Linfield won the league.

In Republic of Ireland, there are concerns that easier access could affect attendances at domestic games, while Bohemians are predicted to win the league.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.4.1992

Teddy Sheringham is the cover star of an edition of Shoot edited by John Fashanu, looking forward to the League Cup Final between Nottingham Forest and Manchester United, with United represented on the cover with an inset photo of Mark Hughes.

Curiously, Sheringham and Hughes were on opposing sides in the League Cup Final a decade later, with Hughes being on the winning side in both games.

Gordon Strachan hits back at critics of the quality of English football by listing six players that are top quality – Roy Keane, David Hirst, Carlton Palmer, Alan Shearer, Rob Jones and Andy Sinton, revealing that Ron Atkinson was looking at signing Jones when he was United manager.

John Fashanu gets a double page feature where he guest edits Shoot.

In letters, one reader thinks it is time for Tim Flowers to be given a chance for England.

In international news, it’s all about departures, or possible departures, with Hugo Sanchez possibly leaving Real Madrid, Darko Pancev leaving Red Star Belgrade for Inter Milan and Sven Goran Eriksson leaving Benfica for Sampdoria.

Shoot dedicates 8 pages to the League Cup Final with interviews with Paul Ince, Mark Hughes, Nigel Clough and Andy Marriott. Guest editor John Fashanu gives his verdict, a victory for Nottingham Forest. Manchester United won 1-0.

Middlesbrough defender Alan Kernaghan is interviewed, wanting promotion to the top flight and a Northern Ireland cap in 1992, while revealing that he most famous person outside of football he has met was his late uncle, Jackie Wright, Benny Hill’s sidekick.

The magazine ends with a double page spread on Gerry Creaney, dubbed “Scottish football’s new Golden Boy”

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1992

It’s Cup Semi-Finals in England and Scotland, and this is reflected with John Byrne of Sunderland being the cover star.

As you open the magazine, there is an article titled “Stuff Your Seats”, as Shoot canvassed fans for their opinion on all seater stadiums, the majority of responses were against this.

Liverpool and Portsmouth’s Semi-Final gets previewed with Ian Rush and Warren Aspinall profiling their team-mates, while Gordon Armstrong and Robert Fleck do so for the Sunderland v Norwich tie.

Jim Leighton gets interviewed about what he describes as “My United Hell” after being dropped at Old Trafford, and how he had initial doubts about signing for Dundee, and now has ambitions of winning promotion to the Scottish Premier League.

John Murray from Cork suggests that the costs of all seater stadiums means it makes more sense for clubs to groundshar. Jimmy Greaves agrees with him, but can’t see it happening.

In Scotland, Shoot profiles Hearts goalkeeper Henry Smith, who is determined to make up for his error which cost Hearts their Semi-Final against Celtic at Hampden in 1988. Smith’s ambitions are to win the Scottish Cup and go to Euro 92, having made his international debut earlier this year at the age of 35.

Brett Angell of Southend gets interviewed about rejecting a moive to big spending Blackburn Rovers, saying that the timing was all wrong.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, which will preview the League Cup Final between Nottingham Forest and Manchester United.

The magazine ends with a double page spread on the troubles endured by London’s top flight clubs in 91-92.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : 90 MINUTES – 19.12.1992

It’s a double issue of 90 Minutes as Christmas 1992 approaches, with Alan Shearer of Blackburn Rovers being the cover star.

Chris Woods of Sheffield Wednesday gets a double page spread as he looks back at his year, expressing his disappointment at England’s early exit from Euro 92.

90 Minutes Live goes to Millwall v Southend, and canvasses supporters on theri highlights and lowlights of the year.

Les Ferdinand is the subject of a Q and A, where he reveals that he just doesn’t get the fuss about one of the year’s biggest hits, Stay by Shakespear’s Sister.

In Scotland, Hibs striker Keith Wright is interviewed, where he reveals he can’t wait to see the back of 1992.

Pasquale Bruno of Torino is interviewed, where he reveals he wants to play in England, ideally somewhere in the North of England to be close to his friend Ian Rush.

John Byrne gets interviewed as he aims to get Millwall promoted back to the top flight after joining them in a shock transfer, just six months after helping Sunderland reach the FA Cup Final.

In their weekly Italian football column, it is reported that Thomas Brolin is being lined up by Sampdoria.

Darren Ferguson gets interviewed, having broken into the Manchester United team this year, and discusses how hard he has to work to get into the team, picked by his dad Alex.

A player from Manchester United’s future, Dwight Yorke, gets interviewed as he speaks of his frustration at not being able to get a game for Aston Villa due to the form of Dean Saunders and Dalian Atkinson.

Alan McLaren of Hearts is the subject of a Q and A where he reveals that the best ever concert he went to was Wet Wet Wet at Edinburgh Castle.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – FEBRUARY 1992

It’s early 1992, and Q has two big interviews as their cover stars – George Michael and Lou Reed.

As you open the magazine, Tony Wilson (Or, as Q addressed him, Anthony H Wilson) felt Q’s wrath, being the subject of their “Who the hell does …….” column.

In news, Kurt Cobain introduced himself on stage in Newcastle as “I am a homosexual. I am a drug taker, and I fuck pot-bellied pigs” while relations between George Harrison and Eric Clapton were said to be strained, as they toured Japan together.

Recent research has show that the average Radio 1 listener is 29, while the average Radio 2 listener is 61.

Freddie Mercuty of Queen had recently died, and Q does a double page picture of him on stage at Wembley, with accompanying text.

Tori Amos gets a double page spread, before you turn over the page to see a three page spread on the recently reformed Procal Harum

Also getting a three page spread is Marc Cohn, on the back of his success with Walking In Memphis.

Q does a chart of celebs who have treaded the boards in Panto over Christmas/New Year including Rod Hull in Crawley, David Essex in Bradford and Lionel Blair in Stockport.

Cover star George Michael gets featured, as Q joins him in New York, where he is about to perform two concerts at Madison Square Gardens.

Talking of concerts, Q follows up their feature on George Michael with a five page spread on ticket touting.

Lou Reed gets six pages as he prepares to bring out his 25th album, this one focusing on death.

With 1991 having just ended, Q looks back at the year, genre by genre, in a twelve page series, and then follows it with a two page look at the tours and albums coming in 1992.

In gigs, Q reviews Ned’s Atomic Dustbin at McGonagles in Dublin.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – SEPTEMBER 1992

Morrissey, without a shirt, with the headline “Talking up Your Arsenal”, is the cover star of Q, as he prepares to release his latest solo album, Your Arsenal.

Garry Bushell feels Q’s wrath, as the subject of their “Who the hell does ……” column.

In news, Axl Rose surrendered himself to police on charges of provoking a riot, a full year after a concert in St Louis ended in a riot.

Kylie Minogue stated she was only friends with Prince.

Pat Roberts, new singer of The Stranglers, interviews celebrity Stranglers fan Stuart Pearce for their fan club magazine.

Pearce complained that a local radio show he was asked to guest DJ on had censored some of his picks, such as The Clash, The Damned and The Vibrators.

Pearce also said that his music videos “get howled off” in favour of dance and soft rock by his team-mates.

Not sure if the interview did Pearce any good, as Nottingham Forest got relegated that season.

Meanwhile, Sinead O’Connor has recorded some backing vocals for Peter Gabriel’s new album.

The BBC were forced to issue a denial that they were on the verge of cancelling Top Of The Pops.

Sophie B Hawkins, having had a Transatlantic hit with Damn, I Wish I Was Your Lover, gets a double page feature.

Another female getting the double page treatment is Betty Boo, determined not to be seen as a flash in the pan, declaring “I don’t see myself rapping in 10 years time. I do eventually want to sing. I’m capable of writing songs”

The subject of “Where Are They Now?” was Adam and the Ants, it was revealed that Adam was working on a rockier solo album with Bernard Edwards from Chic, and Larry Blackmon from Cameo.

Reading Festival gets a four page feature as it celebrates it’s 20th anniversary.

Michael Jackson’s new tour gets a feature, looking at the excessive record company promotion of Jackson.

Q’s big Morrissey interview sees him issue his wrath on Johnny Rogan, the author of a biography of him and Johnny Marr, which he had refused to co-operate on, stating, “It was billed as the definitive story of The Smiths. The only definitive story of The Smiths is my story, if I ever tell it”

When questioned on a song that seems to sympathise with football hooligans, he simply replies “Well, they have such great taste in footwear”, before ending “As long as people don’t die, I am amused”

On Politics, he adds “I don’t want to be European, I want England to remain an island”

To accompany the article, Q gets musicians such as David Bowie, Justin Currie, Siobhan Fahey, Carl Smyth and Brett Anderson to list their favourite Morrissey song.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SELECT – JUNE 1992

Kylie Minogue and Bobby Gillespie, an unlikely pair, are the cover stars of Select in the early summer of 1992.

In news, Morrissey is the subject of an autobiography, which he hates, despite the fact he hasn’t read it.

Saint Etienne are subject to an interview as they visit a waxwork museum and get photographed with their favourite pop stars. Bob Stanley announces that the band were looking to get their album finished by June, mainly so he could take time off to watch Euro 92 and Wimbledon.

In competitions, you could win tickets to see James, Sisters Of Mercy t-shirts, or a book about REM.

Reviews that month included The Charlatans in Manchester and Suede in Tunbridge Wells.

U2 take out an full page ad for an anti Sellafield concert in Manchester that they were headlining.

Select sets up an interview between Kylie Minogue and Bobby Gillespie. Kylie shies away when Bobby asks her about the 1992 UK General Election, saying she only cares about the environment.

Kylie gets asked about U2, stating “To be honest, i’ve never thought to myself that U2 are sexy”

Bobby then asks Kylie when she is going to do a Primal Scream cover, and suggesting they could be the “Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood of the 90s”

The magazine ends with Richard Fairbrass of Right Said Fred being interviewed, stating that Hardcore Techno isn’t finished, Sarah Ferguson would be suited to Donald Trump, they met Faith No More in America, who told them that Right Said Fred were their favourite band, and had talked to their record company about supporting them on tour.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 5.9.1992

Ipswich Town, promoted to England’s top flight for the first time since 1986, are the cover stars of Shoot, having made a good start to the season.

Lee Sharpe, hoping for a return to form after missing most of 91/92 through injury, is the subject of a Q and A, mostly covering his absence from the first team, stating that he wished to be ready for action in November.

Meanwhile, Michael Laudrup of Barcelona is advertising Patrick boots. The small print states that his brother Brian also wears Patrick boots.

After a disappointing Euro 92, Shoot assembles an expert panel to decide what England’s first choice team should be. This panel featured : Jimmy Greaves, Geoff Hurst. Kenny Sansom, Trevor Brooking. And John Fashanu.

Due to a printing error, a picture of Rob Jones appeared where Ian Wright should have been in their line-up

Turning over, Ian Wright appears in a double paged advert for Nike, with him on the right, and the left being taken up by red test saying ‘GARY WHO?’, a reference to Gary Lineker’s departure from English football.

Meanwhile, for most of Europe (some countries who failed to qualify for Euro 92, including Wales and Northern Ireland, began during the 91/92 season), the qualification campaign for the 1994 was about to start, and Shoot combines England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland games into a double page spread.

Flags, are not their strong point. Northern Ireland have the St Patrick’s Saltire, Latvia have a Soviet Latvia flag (outdated since 1990), Wales have no Dragon in their flag, and Faroe Islands have a Czechoslovia (also in the group, but played under the name of RCS during 1993) flag next to them.

England were playing Spain that week, in an international friendly, their World Cup campaign not starting until October 1992.

Ominously, England’s preview begins with a quote from Doug Ellis warning Graham Taylor that the next two years were going to be tough for him.

The reason for this was due to the number of games played by top flight English clubs, but that they were hoping to reduce the Premier League to 20 clubs within three years (The Premier League was reduced to 20 clubs for the 95/96 season)

Ellis said that Taylor’s ambition was for England’s top flight to be 18 clubs. That has yet to happen.

Shoot dedicated a page to readers letters on the recent ‘Back Pass Rule’, none of which had any sympathy for goalkeepers, now unable to pick up backpasses.

Ipswich Town were visited by Shoot to appear in a ‘Superstars’ type feature, trying to see tho has the Hardest Shot, Longest Throw, and longest Keeper’s Throw.

Neil Thompson (Hardest Shot, Longest Throw) and Craig Forrest (Keeper’s Throw) were the early leaders in the early stages of this competition.

Both players have an interesting Old Trafford connection. Both played in the Ipswich team which lost 9-0 at Old Trafford in 1995, while Thompson (Barnsley, 7-0 in 1997) and Forrest (West Ham United, 7-1 in 2000) both suffered large defeats with future employers.

Nigel Worthington is given a page to predict the results on six games over the weekend, of games involving his former clubs, and those games being televised.

Leeds United travelled to Old Trafford for Sky’s Super Sunday in a battle between the previous season’s top two, with neither side making a good start to 92/93. Worthington said it was close to call, but that Leeds were a slightly better team because they had Eric Cantona.

Little did we know happen then, that Eric Cantona would be playing at Old Trafford as a home player in just three months time.

Worthing predicted a 2-1 win for Leeds. It finished 2-0 to Manchester United.

That weekend, Football Italia launched on Channel 4, with (Des Walker’s) Sampdoria taking on (Gazza’s) Lazio. Worthington wasn’t convinced.

“I’m not sure about the introduction of televised football from Italy, and i’d rather watch Arsenal v Liverpool. I think people will soon realise that the English League is still the best”

During the 90s, Italian clubs won 3 European Cups (5 Runners-Up), 3 European Cup Winners Cups (1 Runner-Up) and 7 UEFA Cups (6 Runners-Up)

Meanwhile, Les Ferdinand gets a profile, answering questions, his favourite band are The Whispers.

A full page is given to a competition, that all the cool kids want, a VIP Day Out at Hearts ………. and a complete Hearts kit and tracksuit. All you had to do was answer three easy questions.

Over the page is another competition, which was probably a bit better, a Juventus shirt signed by David Platt, at the bottom of a double page spread where David Platt previews the forthcoming Serie A season.

Jean Pierre Papin gets a double page spread, having just joined AC Milan from Marseille.

Unfortunately, the move wasn’t as successful as people had predicted.