MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JUNE 1997

Paul McCartney, promoting his new album ‘Flaming Pie’ is the cover star of this edition of Q, from the summer of 1997.

Former Primer Minister Ted Heath also features, being the subject of the monthly “Who the hell does ……..” column.

In news, there is an interview with the country’s biggest band, Swing Out Sister. Not this country, but Japan about how unappreciated they are in their home country and their love of Japan.

Louise Wener, lead singer of Sleeper, gets a double page spread as she sits online, answering questions from fans via a chatroom on the Q website.

How primitive, seeing as celebrities do this everyday now via Twitter.

Tipped for greatness was Fountains Of Wayne ……… only the seven years before they had their only big hit “Stacey’s Mom”

A whopping twelve pages gets dedicated to an interview with Paul McCartney, including a buyers guide to his back catalogue, both as a Beatle and a solo artist.

In chart news, Chemical Brothers top the album chart, beating off competition from Spice Girls and Wet Wet Wet. Bee Gees have two albums in the top twenty.

In other news, Channel 5 is launched and Q dedicates two pages to this by looking back at the launches of the four other terrestrial channels.

Gary Barlow, then trying to make his name as a solo artist, is featured in a short interview at the end where he reveals that Adam and the Ants was his first concert, that he was the hardest boy in his year at school, and that he doesn’t like Reggae.

Gary Barlow also stated that “I like a girl who can dance and really knows how to move her body”

Something to bear in mind if you are entering X-Factor 2012.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JANUARY 1997

January 1997 is the subject of the latest Magazine Archive, set during the peak years of Britpop, and featuring Oasis on the cover, focusing on the Q Awards, which had just been recently staged.

It was a period when Q was mourning one of their main writers, John Bauldie, who was a passenger in the helicopter crash which killed then Chelsea Chairman Matthew Harding, which is commemorated in the obituaries section.

A whopping fifteen pages are dedicated to the Q Awards, with the first page of the feature having a double paged photo of various guests on stage, engaging in small talk.

Eagle eyed readers will have noticed Dermot Morgan and Ruud Gullit in conversation. It is worth clarifying that Ruud Gullit wasn’t sat on a shed, possibly because it wasn’t Christmas.

1996 was the year that saw Q celebrate it’s 10th anniversary, and the awards ceremony saw various celebrities record video messages of congratulations.

Amongst them, was Tony Blair, then Leader Of The Opposition, recorded one saying “Ten years in power with no opposition – Sounds good to me”. It was almost prophetic.

Ian Brodie was riding on the crest of a wave in 1996 on the back of “Three Lions” and gets five pages looking at his career to date, with minimal mentions of Baddiel and Skinner.

That month, Lightning Seeds were 11 in the Album Chart, being kept out of the Top Ten by Robson and Jerome, Spice Girls, East 17, Simply Red, The Smurfs, Boyzone and Rod Stewart.

Sometimes, history is better off being rewritten.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – MAY 1997

In this segment, we look at Four Four Two, from May 1997, which pulled off a bit of a scoop by getting Alex Fergsuon (Not yet Sir Alex) and Kenny Dalglish on their front cover as Manchester United and Newcastle United were challenging for the title, alongside Arsenal and Liverpool.

The Premier League was nearing the end of it’s fifth season, and Ferguson and Dalglish (with Blackburn Rovers) had won the previous four, with Fergie leading 3-1

The Spine Line read “Alex, Matt, Tom, Johnny, Matt, Bill, Bill, George” which I guess might be some reference to Scottish managers in English football, considering Ferguson and Dalglish are on the cover with Matt being Busby, Bill being Shankly and George being Graham.

Recently sacked BBC Five Live presenter Danny Baker gets a page dedicated to him in support.

In the world of advertising, Ben Thatcher and Chris Perry of Wimbledon are advertising Valsport’s multicoloured range of boots.

To appreciate the quality of Valsport, you need to wear them apparantly.

World Cups of the future take up space in the magazine, with two pages bizarrely dedicated to wether England should make a joint bid with Germany to host the 2006 World Cup.

England had just successfully hosted Euro 96 and wanted to exploit this by bidding to host the 2006 World Cup, the next tournament (apart from Euro 2004, but having hosted Euro 96, it is unlikely it would be favourably looked at) that was available to bid for.

Germany had long stated their desire to host World Cup 2006. Viewers of ESPN Classic will note that Premier League grounds had hoardings with “England 2006” written on them.

When it came to the vote in the summer of 2000, it was South Africa, not England, who were Germany’s main rival as England were eliminated in the first round of voting.

Germany edged out South Africa, who eventually won the right to host the 2010 World Cup.

A feature titled “The Odd Couple” looks at the 2002 World Cup to be held in South Korea and Japan, the first time ever the World Cup would be co-hosted.

Despite the much feared tensions between the two host nations, the only confrontation of the 2002 World Cup would be between Mick McCarthy and Roy Keane at the Republic of Ireland training camp.