MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 2.3.2002

The World Cup is not far off, and the race is on to be leading the line for England in the Far East. Michael Owen is guaranteed to go, but the race is on to partner him.

Match does a feature on current Premier League managers who have been cover stars in Match during their playing days.

Match assesses England’s striking options and their chances of going to the World Cup, and it’s good news for Michael Owen, Robbie Fowler, Teddy Sheringham and Emile Heskey.

Match has a weekly series called The Men For Sven, profiling England’s squad players. This week’s subject is Gareth Southgate.

Staying with World Cup previews, there is a profile of Group C teams Costa Rica and China.

One of the strikers profiled earlier, Emile Heskey, gets a three page profile.

Hot players profiled by Match include Patrick Suffo, Marco Di Vaio and Maurice Ross.

In Spain, Barcelona striker Patrick Kluivert reveals that he wants to one day play in England.

In letters, Ross Bissell from Dundee predicts that Scotland will do well at Euro 2004 under newly appointed manager Berti Vogts.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – NOVEMBER 2002

Kanu and Thierry Henry are the cover stars of this edition of When Saturday Comes, modestly complimenting themselves on Arsenal’s brilliant start to the season.

This editions editorial focuses on footballer’s autobiographies, after Manchester United have banned their players from writing autobiographies after the fall-out from Roy Keane’s recent book.

The furore, gets further investigated in a full page article.

Across the page, there is an article about Darlington’s failed bid to sign Faustino Asprilla, ahead of their move to a 25,000 seater stadium in 2003.

Talking of new stadiums, there might be new ones coming in Republic of Ireland and Scotland, as both countries are making a joint bid to host Euro 2008, with the lack of current stadiums in both countries getting featured by WSC.

The 2003 Women’s World Cup Qualifiers get featured, with France standing between England and a place in the finals.

The French are now allowing their women’s team to use the Clairefontaine facility that the men’s team used to win the 1998 World Cup, and have set a goal of winning the women’s one by 2007.

The tournament was moved from China to USA due to the SARS outbreak, while France won the Qualifier but went out in the group stages. They didn’t win the 2007 competition.

There are features on recently relegated Midlands clubs Derby County (2002) and Coventry City (2001) as they try to get back to the Premier League.

Ahead of a documentary which is about the be premiered, there is a double page spread on the North Korea team that reached the 1966 World Cup Quarter-Finals.

Peter Taylor is helping out at Peterborough, just two years after being England manager, which is covered with the witty headline “From Becks To Posh”

There is a profile of Richard Witschge, highly rated by Johan Cruyff but couldn’t get a game for Blackburn.

Sepp Blatter has just been re-elected FIFA President, and one writer takes him up on his promise to give Oceana an automatic World Cup place.

The monthly look at the best of the web takes a look at the best Welsh football websites, with the national team making a good start to the Euro 2004 Qualifiers.

WSC heads to Norway to look at the problems in club football caused by Rosenborg’s dominance in the 1990s.

Talking of declines, WSC looks at the decline of Scotland and Austria as European forces, focusing on a Champions League game between Sturm Graz and Rangers in 2000.

The magazine ends with a look at the highlights and lowlights of Sheffield United.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – DECEMBER 2002

Having just broken into the Everton team, teenage sensation Wayne Rooney give an interview to When Saturday Comes. Well, sort of.

A blank speech bubble represents the fact that Everton manager David Moyes has blocked media requests to interview his young player.

The editorial focuses on racism in football, most notably at the European Championship Qualifier between Slovakia and England, but warns that football authorities in England need to address concerns closer to home.

There is a profile of former Belgium goalkeeper Jean-Marie Pfaff, now forging a new career as a Reality TV star in a Flemish version of The Osbournes.

There is a feature on four clubs at differing ends of the football pyramid who are looking to move out of their current ground to a new one – Wimbledon, Chelsea, York City and Brentford.

In Scotland, there is a feature on the race for one of the more invisible honours, 3rd place, aka The Best Of The Rest after Rangers and Celtic, looking at those clubs aiming for that spot.

A more curious phenomenon in recent years was Masters Football, which WSC likened to ageing rock stars only playing hits from 20 years previously.

There is a feature on “lost footballers”, big money signings on high wages. The poster boy of this feature is Mark Bosnich, earning £40,000 in Chelsea’s reserves.

This edition focuses on young players, with a look at the number of French coaches at underage level in England.

Cover star Wayne Rooney is part of a feature looking at the history of hype of young players in English football.

There is also a feature on club football in Czech Republic, due to improved perfomances in Europe this season, with many teams boosted by Euro 96 stars coming home to play their club football.

Yeovil Town get a feature, so long a famous Non League giantkiller, and now on the verge of joining the giants they used to kill.

The rivalry between Cardiff City and Swansea City gets a feature, being described as becoming a poisonous affair in recent years.

The magazine ends with a brief look at the history of Cheltenham Town’s highlights and lowlights.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : KERRANG – 22.6.2002

Matt Bellamy of Muse is the cover star of this edition of Kerrang, which promises to reveal his dark side.

In news, Joey Jordison of Slipknot is unmasked, as he reveals his sideband Murderdolls.

Kerrang looks at the best of the web, and with the World Cup ongoing, lists a website dedicated to ugly footballers as their website of the week.

Cover star Bellamy gets five pages, revealing that he brought ouija boards into school as a ten year old.

There is a look at actors trying to be rock stars, as Jack Black and Jared Leto have gone into the recording studio with their respective bands.

Barney Greenway of Napalm Death shows Kerrang around his house, including a poster of Aston Villa’s 1996 League Cup winning team, and a Villa mug he has had for 12 years.

In album reviews, Dreamland by Robert Plant gets 3 out of 5.

In boxsets, both Buffy and spin-off show Angel both get 4 out of 5.

In upcoming concerts, Queens Of The Stone Age were gig of the week, while Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Vines were recommended.

The magazine ends with an advert for the following week’s edition of Kerrang, which offers free stickers.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 27.4.2002

Ruud Van Nistelrooy is the cover star of Match as the European Cup is the the Last 4, as Manchester United, Real Madrid, Bayern Leverkusen and Barcelona are aiming to lift the trophy at Hampden Park.

But that’s not the biggest story in football. David Beckham has broken his metatarsal and is in danger of missing the World Cup, so Match gives readers to opportunity to wish him well. Meanwhile, a poll of 7-14 year olds say David Beckham has the hardest job in the world …… so Match photoshops him doing other so called “Hard jobs”

In other news, Michael Owen had just become England’s second youngest captain, after Bobby Moore 40 years earlier.

In competitions, you could “Rio” on VHD or DVD, featuring exclusive interviews with Rio Ferdinand, and him giving a tour of Leeds.

If you did win it, and supported Leeds, you might have been handing it in to your local charity shop a few months later, as he signed for Manchester United in July that year.

Peter Schmeichel, recently signed for Manchester City, gets lampooned in Match’s cartoon “Footy Crazy” for his red nose, as City manager Kevin Keegan makes him stick his head in a freezer so it will turn blue.

Match pulled off a bit of a coup, getting a four page exclusive interview with Sir Alex Ferguson, who had recently made a u-turn on his retirement.

Ferguson tells Match that his family convinced him not to retire, and that his goals for the next three seasons (the length of the new contract he had signed) was to win a major tournament, speaking enthusiastically about the fact that the average age of United’s squad was 26.

He then speaks about his management style, and what he looks for in a player, declaring that his two top managers are Ottmar Hitzfeld and Marcello Lippi.

He describes Zinedine Zidane as the best player in the world, but wouldn’t have been prepared to pay the 50m Real Madrid paid for him in 2001 on account of his age.

When asked if he could sign a player from history for the current United team, he eulogises about Pele and Johan Cruyff (he actually signed his son Jordi in 1996) but chooses Real Madrid legend Alfredo Di Stefano.

He’s confident that United can win a 4th successive title, but admits United need Arsenal to drop points, and then United to beat Arsenal to have any chance. Arsenal won every game from February onwards to win the title.

He also praises Sir Bobby Robson for the job he had done with Newcastle (they finished 4th to reach the European Cup) and predicts Chelsea to win the FA Cup (they lost 2-0 to Arsenal) and was upbeat about United’s chance of winning the European Cup in his native Glasgow. They lost on away goals to Bayer Leverkusen.

Match signs off by asking what he wants to achieve in the future, Ferguson simply replies that he wants to maintain the success of the previous 12 years.

Both European Cup Semi-Finals get a double page spread previewing them, and there’s an interview with Butt. Not United’s Nicky, but Bayer Leverkusen goalkeeper Hans Jorg Butt.

As the World Cup draws closer, Match features England hopefuls each week in a feature called “The Men For Sven”, with Ashley Cole the featured player this week.

Staying on the World Cup theme, Republic of Ireland get a full page preview.

In Ads, you could pop down to Woolworths and buy “David Beckham : Close Up” or “Michael Owen : Close Up” on VHS if you wished.

Eidur Gudjohnsen gets a double page interview about his progress at Chelsea, while also touching other matters such as the World Cup, where he describes France as “Very strong”

They went out in the groups without scoring a goal.

The big match of the weekend is Ipswich Town v Manchester United, vital at both ends of the table.

Match predicts a 2-1 United win. United won 1-0.

In foreign news, Roberto Baggio’s dreams of going to a 4th World Cup have been dashed, while Christian Panucci is at the centre of a transfer battle between Barcelona and Real Madrid. He signed for Roma that summer, the club where he spent the 2001-2002 season on loan.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – NOVEMBER 2002

The latest edition of “The Magazine Archive” focuses on Q in November 2002, when U2 Foo Fighters, Graham Coxon and Vanessa Carlton were the cover stars.

The spineline simply reads “Stuart Morgan”. Unable to get it immediately, a quick websearch reveals that Stuart Morgan was an art critic who died in August 2002.

U2 are the main feature on the cover that month, which saw the release of their second Greatest Hits compilation “1990-2000”, while Graham Coxon speaks about his departure from Blur.

John Squire is the subject of “Cash For Questions” ,where readers submit their questions (and successful entrants get a cash prize, hence the feature title) with the questions, unsurprisingly, focusing on all things Stone Roses.

The album chart in late 2002 was topped by Atomic Kitten, with Enrique Iglesias and Nora Jones making appearances in the Top Ten alongaside Oasis, Ash and Coldplay.

Graham Coxon speaking about his departure from Blur gets a 3 page feature while Vanessa Carlton, then enjoying success in the charts with “A Thousand Miles” also gets a 3 page feature.

U2 get a a mammoth 10 pages dedicated to them. As at that time, they were promoting their 1990s Greatest Hits compilation album, the article mainly looks back at U2’s productivity during that decade, with quotes from all 4 members of the band.

Concert reviews that month focus on Rolling Stones, Morrissey, Avril Lavigne and Oasis.