MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : NME BIG BOOK – NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2003

It’s the end of 2003, and NME brings out a Big Book to celebrate, as a photo collage of stars from the year such as Beyonce, Justin Hawkins, Charlie Simpson and Chris Martin form the cover.

The forward, comes from Jack and Kelly Osbourne, with Jack stating his highlight of the year was discovering The Darkness.

The format takes on a month by month review of the year, starting, obviously with January, with Danger! High Voltage by Electric Six being named Song Of The Month.

The Libertines get a double page spread, with Carl Barat looking back at 2003 with some of his favourite photos.

Coldplay go one better and have three pages, looking back at their successful year, which saw them play venues in the UK such as Earls Court and MEN Arena.

That is then followed by a Top Ten highlights from the 2003 NME Awards, which included Steve-O exposing himself in front of The Polythonic Spree.

Turning over the page, it’s The White Stripes. Or is it? Closer inspection reveals The Cheeky Girls dressed up as The White Stripes.

In the accompanying interview, Monica revealed she bought a recent edition of NME and found the articles very interesting, and she would most like to date Hugh Grant, if given a choice of Hollywood stars.

In their review of February, NME announces Move Your Feet by Junior Senior as their Song Of The Month.

NME faves The Strokes get a double page feature as they released their second album in late October.

Also getting a double page feature are Radiohead, as NME lists their Top Ten Radiohead Gigs Of The Year.

In Da Club by 50 Cent is declared Song Of The Month for March, while in news, Top Of The Pops ban t-shirts protesting against the Iraq War.

Which leads us nicely into NME’s Top Ten Anti Iraq War Songs, which includes a reworking of Faith by George Michael and Ms Dynamite.

Avril Lavigne, who had a successful 2003 gets a three page interview, where she reveals her favourite swear word is fuck.

Also getting three pages, is The Music, listing their top ten cities visited, including Blackpool, Paris and San Francisco.

NME love their Top Tens. Next up, is Top Ten Pin Badges.

The next Top Ten goes on a sombre theme, as NME remembers the ten much missed stars who died in 2003, such as Johnny Cash, Barry White, Maurice Gibb and Robert Palmer.

It’s not all Rock, as NME does a double page interview with Girls Aloud, discussing their favourite animal based stories of 2003, such as a farmer who played Classical music to his pigs being branded a noise nuisance by the local council, and a Jack Russell who mastered Surfing.

Back to The Strokes, if you wanted, you could make your own finger puppets of The Strokes.

In news, Siobhan Donaghy, former Sugababe, played at Glastonbury wearing a The Darkness t-shirt.

There is a two page review of Glastonbury, followed by a Dress Up Justin, where you can dress up Justin Hawkins from The Darkness in various outfits.

With the ipod new onto the market, NME dedicates a page to the songs you should put on yours, assuming you had one.

Dick Valentine of Electric Six gets a full page, discussing their massive hit that year, Gay Bar.

More Top Tens now, we have Top Ten Comments From Blazin Squad’s Messageboard, and Simon Amstell details his Top Ten Interviews Of 2003, in his role as host of Popworld on Channel 4.

There was also a quiz, most notably, What Christina Are You?, as you try to find out which Christina Aguilera alter ego you have.

We also get a Top Ten CD:UK Moments, featuring a spat between Louis Walsh and Mel C, where Louis defends Girls Aloud, who he manages, proclaiming “At least Girls Aloud will have successful solo careers”

Having interviewed Princess Diana and Michael Jackson (not together though), who was next for Martin Bashir? Busted. He interviewed them for NME.

And that, was 2003. Um, what a year.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JULY 2003

The summer of 2003 is the latest subject in The Magazine Archive, a time when AC Milan were European Champions and France was getting ready to host the Confederations Cup.

The front cover image is of Paolo Maldini holding aloft the European Cup trophy after a penalty shoot-out win over Juventus at Old Trafford as red and black confetti rains down.

The first six pages are dedicated to reviewing the European Cup Final between AC Milan and Juventus.

Quite how they managed to get six pages out of a dour 0-0 draw, I don’t know.

Eight pages are dedicated to looking at football finances, in a month when it was announced that Real Madrid were the world’s richest football club.

Of the Top 20, 11 had won the European Cup.

Also in the Top 20, 10 of them were British (8 English, 2 Scottish) including 13th place (Unlucky for some you could say) Leeds United, who were relegated from the Premier League.

Newcastle United, ranked 15th, were relegated from the Premier League in 2009.

The Confederations Cup gets six pages of coverage, the same as the European Cup Final.

The editorial for the preview questions the merits of the competition, both in terms of workload on players, and the credibility of a competition, which is a poor cousin to the World Cup, and various continental competitions.

Sadly, the competiton is now best remembered because Cameroon midfielder Marc Vivien Foe collapsed and died during a match against Colombia.

Not to be forgotten, the 2003 UEFA Cup Final between Celtic and Porto got three pages of coverage, as Porto won 3-2, before winning the European Cup a year later.

In the round-ups from around the countries, England’s focuses on the battle for supremacy between Arsenal and Manchester United, as Arsenal retained their FA Cup, but lost the league to United.

A year later, the trophies were reversed. In October 2004, United ended Arsenal’s 49 game unbeaten run with a 2-0 win at Old Trafford, before United secured a double over their North London rivals in the return fixture, a game that saw Roy Keane and Patrick Vieira square up in the tunnel pre-match.

Arsenal had the last laugh that season, beating United in a penalty shoot-out in the FA Cup Final, Arsenal’s last trophy.

The emergence of Chelsea from 2004 onwards has meant that the United-Arsenal rivalry has become dormant, in comparison with it’s peak from 1997-2005.

Amongst the players who are profiled in this edition is Eric Djemba-Djemba of Nantes, who is described as “the latest up and coming talent in Le Championnat to be linked with a move to a big European club, with Juventus, Valencia and Manchester United all said to be interested in him”

He did eventually end up at United that summer, before being offloaded to Aston Villa in January 2005.

He currently plays for Odense in Denmark. That’s probably not where World Soccer would have imagined one of the most sought after players of 2003 to be playing in 2011.