MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.3.1980

It’s the first Cup Final of the 1980s, as Wolves take on Nottingham Forest in the League Cup Final, and Shoot commemorates this by having Emlyn Hughes and John Robertson on the cover.

The match gets six pages, with Emlyn Hughes and John McGovern discussing the effect of their respective managers. It is a cup final which sees Nottingham Forest aiming to win the trophy for the 3rd successive season.

In Scotland, Derek Johnstone uses his column to welcome Ian Redford to Ibrox, having signed from Dundee for a Scottish record of £210,000.

Terry Venables uses his column to express his delight at George Best’s return to football with Hibernian, and wishes Alan Ball good luck in his role as Player/Manager at Blackpool.

Talking of Hibs, there is a feature on Peter Cormack, as he returns to the club where he started his career, after leaving for Nottingham Forest in the early 1970s.

Martin Thomas of Bristol Rovers gets a profile, as he is described as Wales next goalkeeper.

Norwich City are the subject of a Club Spotlight, and readers got a free poster.

There is a feature called Soccer’s Wasted Talent, looking at the players who are sitting on the bench for their club, such as Duncan McKenzie, Peter Barnes and Tony Currie.

Chris Hughton talks to Shoot about being happy at Spurs, and Steve Coppell issues a warning to Liverpool that Manchester United will fight until the very end for the title.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1985

Glenn Hoddle of England is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Or perhaps, not of England, if the headline is anything to go by.

This was also the week in Back To The Future II where Marty McFly visits 2015.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Steve McMahon, who has just joined Liverpool from Aston Villa, nearly three years after rejecting Liverpool to go to Villa Park.

Meanwhile, there are reports that England’s top clubs could be forming a breakaway Super League.

Cover star Glenn Hoddle is interviewed, finally becoming an England regular, and is confident of returning home from Mexico the following summer with the World Cup.

The cover headline “I’LL QUIT ENGLAND” refers to his club status, as he expresses his desire to play on the continent, which he did in 1987 when he signed for Monaco.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that Peter Barnes is worthy of a place in the England squad to provide competition for John Barnes and Chris Waddle.

Northern Ireland’s vital World Cup Qualifier away to Romania gets previewed, with manager Billy Bingham confidently predicting that Northern Ireland will finish 2nd in their group and head to Mexico.

Republic Of Ireland also have ambitions of going to Mexico, and have blooded Tony Cascarino into their squad in time for their vital game away to the Soviet Union.

Portsmouth manager Alan Ball gets a photo collage, as he aims to lead the club back to the top flight of English football.

Peter Shilton gets a double page feature as he becomes England’s most capped goalkeeper, complete with a tribute from Gordon Banks, who he replaced at Leicester City, Stoke City and England, with the headline “PETER SHILTON – KING OF KEEPERS”

West Germany manager Franz Beckenabauer feels this season’s European club competitions have been devalued by the absence of English clubs, while Canada have qualified for the World Cup for the first time in their history.

Meanwhile, Napoli failed in their bid to sign Hugo Maradona from Argentinos Juniors, the younger brother of Diego Maradona.

A dispute between the governing body and broadcasters meant that there were no games on TV, so Shoot did a double page photo collage of the best strikes.

In Scotland, there is a full page profile and a poster of Celtic.

In Wales, Mark Hughes was set to miss the opening games of Euro 88 Qualifying, due to a red card in an underage Euro qualifier against Yugoslavia in 1983.

Steve Cowan gets a full page feature, having just signed for Hibs and is hoping to put his injury problems behind him.

Bradford City get featured, as the club tries to recover from the tragic fire at their ground five months earlier.

Peter Reid uses his column to talk about Everton’s problems conceding goals, especially in the early moments of games.

Reid’s Everton team-mate Gary Lineker is happy, having found a Snooker Club near his home in Southport, and has managed to convince Willie Thorne to start supporting Everton.

Meanwhile, Portsmouth are trying to sign Paul Mariner from Arsenal.

The magazine ends with a profile of Davie McPherson of Rangers. His favourite music is Dire Straits and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.1.1972

It’s the early weeks of 1972 and Shoot has gone Cup Crazy, as this week’s edition has a free wallchart for you to chart the progress of the Scottish Cup and FA Cup.

Unfortunately, there was no such chart for the Irish Cup or Welsh Cup.

The chart had an impressive list of admirers in the shape of Bobby Moore, George Best and Alan Ball. Maybe not that surprising that they endorsed it, as they were all Shoot columnists at that time.

George Best went as far to describe it as “Definitely one of the finest charts i’ve ever seen”

Shoot has a Crosstalk colum where two footballers debaate a topical subject. This week’s one saw Alan Mullery (Tottenham Hotspur) and David Nish (Leicester City) debating if you need luck to win the FA Cup.

Mullery would have greater knowledge of that, having won the trophy in 1967, while Nish was a losing finalist in 1969.

Bobby Moore’s colum talks about how he has helped out Luton Town by appearing at social functions, but is determied to put them out of the FA Cup, as they were West Ham’s 3rd Round opponents.

Moore predicts that Arsenal and Leeds will be the two sides most likely to lift the trophy, and so it proved, with Leeds beating Arsenal 1-0 in the final.

Shoot does a double page spread on four top flight clubs that have never won the FA Cup – Coventry City, Crystal Palace, Ipswich Town and Stoke City.

Within 15 years, Coventry (1987) and Ipswich (1978) had lifted the trophy, while Crystal Palace (1990) and Stoke City (2011) have lost a final since then.

George Best’s column comments about how he wants to win the cup in 1972. George Best never won the FA Cup in his career.

Shoot does a double page spread on double winners Arsenal, asking if they can repeat their League and FA Cup success of 1971 a year later.

It wasn’t to be for Arsenal as they finished 5th, and as previously mentioned, lost the FA Cup Final 1-0 to Leeds. Derby County, led by Brian Clough, were Champions that season.

Frank McClintock talks about that final against Liverpool, revealing he was shatterd at the end of a busy week that saw him win the League, Player Of The Year, and get a Scotland recall.

Gordon Banks gets a player profile where he reveals he likes holidays and hates shaving, fog and football hooliganism. The person he would most like to meet in the world is Raquel Welch.

Aberdeen, Scottish Cup winners in 1970, then league runners-up in 1971 get a double page spread look at their recent upturn in form.

John Tudor of Newcastle United gets interviewed, talking about his team-mate Malcolm MacDonald, revealing that he even pressurises himself to score in training, such is his lust for goals.

There is also a double page spread looking at Pele’s career, part of a series, as this as title Part One.

Trevor Hockey of Sheffield United also gets a career profile, while there is a poster of Birmingham City’s Bob Hatton on the back cover.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6.2.1971

Action from a match between Stoke City and Manchester City is the cover image as the the 1970-1971 season approaches it’s final stages, with Shoot asking if Leeds or Arsenal will be Champions.

Shoot does a double page spread where they interview players such as Nobby Stiles, Glyn Pardoe, John Sissons, Bobby Gould and Mark Lazarus about what it is like to score at Wembley.

Even though he is a defender, Bobby Moore uses his column to declare that matches are won in midfield, and commenting on who his favourite midfieldes are.

Joe McBride of Dunfermline Athletic answers questions submitted by Shoot readers, with Shoot giving a list of upcoming interviewees, including Peter Shilton, Johnny Giles and Steve Perryman.

Peter Shilton gets given a full page by Shoot to explain how he manages to kick the ball so far up the field.

There is a poster of Sunderland defender Colin Todd.

Scotland are in action against Belgium in a European Championship Qualifier, with Shoot noting that history was on Scotland’s side, as they had a better record in head to head meetings between the two sides.

Belgium won the match 3-0. Scotland and Belgium would see a lot of each other over the next 16 years, being paired together in Qualification for 1980, 1984 and 1988, as well as 1972.

England were also in European Championship action, away to Malta, with Shoot’s preview pointing out that Malta have the ability to hold out against England. England won the match 1-0.

Shoot previews the title run-in between Leeds and Arsenal, listing their remaining fixtures but sitting on the fence with regards to who will win it.

Arsenal won the league that season, finishing 1 point clear of 2nd place Leeds, and then added the FA Cup, becoming the 2nd side in the 20th Century to win the League and FA Cup double.

John Hollins is interviewed, stating that he studies Bobby Charltopn and Billy Bremner in an attempt to be a better player, stating that he wants to be part of England’s squad for the 1974 World Cup.

Dick Staite of Clyde is interviewed, and he states that the person he would like to meet most is Alexander Dubcek, former Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia.

Alan Ball uses his column to state that stay away fans are affecting team morales, as players find it difficult to play in front of empty stands.

Peter Simpson previews Arsenal’s trip to Anfield, claiming that his side feel unbeatable.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.12.1985

Frank McAvennie is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, having just broken into the Scotland team.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has a double page feature on Kerry Dixon, where it is revealed that Spurs turned down the chance to sign him.

Garry Birtles is interviewed, having just been converted into a central defender, and is loving it, despite the fear of giving away a penalty.

Terry Gibson tells Shoot that he does not expect Manchester United to win the league, which will have been awkward when he signed for United later that season.

The IFA have stated that they expect to make £250,000 from their appearance at next year’s World Cup in Mexico.

There is continuing talk of a Super League in English football. Shoot asks various football stars about the way forward. Gary Stevens (the Spurs one, not the Everton one) suggests games on Sundays, Don Mackay of Coventry wants 6 divisions of 16 teams, while Mark Hughes wants less games.

Sunderland v Portsmouth is billed as the big game of the weekend, and Shoot focuses on the mutual admiration between respective managers Alan Ball and Lawrie McMenemy.

Scotland’s World Cup Qualifier against Australia gets a double page spread, focusing on Scotland’s strikers at opposite ends of their career – Frank McAvennie making his debut, and Kenny Dalglish winning his 99th cap.

Talking of Scotland, Shoot looks at youth team boss Andy Roxburgh, and his globetrotting exploits in 1985.

Most of those, were scouting trips. Talking of scouting, Shoot scouts Steve McMahon of Liverpool, describing him as a new Graeme Souness.

McAvennie is mentioned again, in Ian Rush’s column, who describes his as a great goalscorer, adding that his Wales team-mate Mark Hughes isn’t a great goalscorer.

Jimmy Greaves gives his Star Letter award to Norwich City supporting brothers championing Steve Bruce’s case for a place in the England squad.

Bryab Robson uses his column to reveal that the signing of Colin Gibson has lifted the mood of everybody at Old Trafford.

Bobby Moore has enlisted the help of various former West Ham team-mates as he aims for success as Southend United manager. The club are currently making plans to move to a new stadium at Rochford.

Leeds United get a Club Profile and Team Poster.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 7.12.1985

Pat Jennings is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, celebrating a clean sheet at Wembley in a 0-0 draw between England and Northern Ireland that was enough to send Northern Ireland to the 1986 World Cup.

England were the only unbeaten team in European qualification, and Bryan Robson uses his column to compliment the players who helped England get there, such as Gary Stevens, Paul Bracewell and suggests that Peter Barnes could be a long shot for the squad.

Shoot gives a double page photo spread to Pat Jennings and his saves that secured Northern Ireland the draw at Wembley they needed to qualify.

Terry Butcher will be a key man for England in Mexico, and gets a double page spread as he returns from injury, aiming to keep Ipswich in the top flight.

Alan Ball is the subject of a new series where Shoot collates quotes about a famous footballing figure, where former team-mat Gordon West reveals that defeat makes him cry.

Shoot’s editorial appeals to UEFA to allow English clubs back into Europe, after a season in exile as a result of the Heysel Disaster.

As well as Bryan Robson, Peter Reid jumps on the Paul Bracewell bandwagon, praising him in his column.

Linfield get a feature as they aim to win their 5th successive title in what is their centenary season, despite the absence of Martin McGaughey through injury.

Jimmy Greaves Letters Page has a letter suggesting that England’s 0-0 draw with Northern Ireland was fixed, but Greaves disputes this by praising Northern Ireland, who narrowly lost to England in Belfast and beat Romania home and away.

In news, Aston Villa are in danger of losing their shirt sponsorship deal with Mita Copiers as a result of the TV blackout due to a dispute with broadcasters, while the FAI and Sligo Rovers denied a claim by Leicester City player Steve Lynex that he was run out of town by a gunman when on trial at Sligo.

Mark Hughes offered tickets to a 12 year old Sheffield Wednesday fan to their visit to Old Trafford later in the season, after he was hit by a ball that Hughes hit into a crowd when the sides met at Hillsbrough.

Les Sealey had his car stolen, but what he wants back the most is his shin pads, which he has worn throughout his career and views them as lucky.

Aberdeen get a team profile, where talk of a Clean Sweep of Scottish trophies has been banned, according to Willie Miller.

Staying in Scotland, they believe they’ve unearthed a new Danny McGrain, but it’s a Rangers player, Hugh Burns.

In foreign news, Brazil’s older players such as Socrates, Zico and Falcao are worried that Mario Zagallo will axe them for the World Cup if he is appointed manager. Derry City’s crowds of 7,000 are the biggest in the League Of Ireland, while San Marino are applying for membership to FIFA and UEFA, and hope to enter the qualifiers for the 1990 World Cup.

David Williams of Norwich City gets a feature, having taken the unusual step of quitting as Bristol Rovers manager (He was a 30 year old player/manager) to become a player at Norwich City.

Mark Falco gets a feature, after having to fight off competition to gain a place in Tottenham Hotspur’s starting team.

Franz Carr of Nottingham Forest has made such an impression, that Bobby Robson has marked him as one of England’s stars of the 1990 World Cup. No pressure on him, as Shoot bills him “The new George Best”

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to cheerlead for Steve Williams, his Arsenal team-mate to be in the England squad.

Shoot does a feature on Charlton Athletic, aiming for promotion to the top flight, despite having to play their home matches at Selhurst Park.

In adverts, Bucks Fizz are advertising calculators.

Frank McAvennie is the subject of this week’s “Focus On ….” where he reveals his favourite bands are U2 and Queen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 8.9.1979

Joe Jordan of Manchester United is the cover star of Shoot, which had free Team Tabs of England’s 3rd and 4th divisions, which completed the set, enabling you to track teams progress during the 1979-1980 season.

There is a full page dedicated to the qualifiers for Euro 1980, resuming after a summer break. The headline, listed all the group leaders.

They got one spectacularly wrong, having proclaimed Portugal as on their way to Italy. It was Belgium, lying 4th out of 5th, 3 points behind the Portugese (in the era of 2 points for a win) who had a late surge to win the group. Belgium went on the reach the final in Italy.

Ray Clemence’s column sees him talk about veterans he admires, picking out Alan Ball, a World Cup winner in 1966, still playing in the top flight (for Southampton) as the 1980s approached.

In competitions, readers had the opportunity to win a “Referee’s Watch”, if you were that way inclined.

There was a colour photo (A lot of the printing in 1979 was in black/white) dedicated to top flight footballers such as Gordon Hill, Gary Owen, Brian Talbot and Mick Channon taking part in Footballers v Athletes episode of Superstars

There is a profle of West Ham goalkeeper Phil Parkes. If you’re interested, his favourite singers are Johnny Mathis, Rita Coolidge and Bee Gees.

In adverts, Bob Paisley advertises Gola trainers with the headline “Having talent is only half the story”

In posters, there was a colour poster of Charlton Athletic.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 2.6.1979

The summer of 1979 is almost upon us, but there are many things to be decided. Amazingly, the Home Championship game between England and Scotland, Scotland’s first visit to Wembley since the (in)famous 1977 game, taking more coverage on the cover ahead of Nottingham Forest’s European Cup Final against Malmo.

The game gets a double page spread, with Denis Law and Alan Ball talking about their memories of the fixture.

Phil Thompson gets a page to speak about his Anfield team mate and international opponent Alan Hansen, describing him as not having a weakness.

Northern Ireland and Wales aren’t left out with Gerry Armstrong and Malcolm Page both being posters, pictured in their international kits.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, heavy on international football with previews of vital European Championship Qualifiers for England (v Bulgaria), Scotland (v Norway), Northern Ireland (v Denmark) and Wales (v Malta), as well as an interview with Daniel Passarella.

There is also photos and reports of European Championship Qualifiers for Northern Ireland (v Bulgaria. Northern Ireland and England were in the same group), Scotland (v Norway) and Wales (v West Germany)

Euro 80 was the first European Championship with a pre-determined host, rather than selecting one of the four countries who won their Quarter-Finals.

Nottingham Forest and Malmo, contesting the European Cup Final, both get a double page spread, as well as a picture collage of how both teams reached the final.

Malmo had an English manager, Bob Houghton, described by Shoot as “The Brian Clough of Sweden”

In news, John Gregory is frustrated at being considered a utility, having worn every number from 2 to 11 in his 57 appearances for the club

Cliftonville get a mention with a short mention of Ciaran McCurry, who underline his potential with a “Near international display” in their Irish Cup Final win over Portadown.

Final league table for both Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland are published. Linfield were champions with 34 points from 22 games, 6 ahead of Glenavon in 2nd place.

It was 2 points for a win in them days. To translate it into 3 points for a win, Linfield would have finished 9 points clear of Glenavon with 48 points.

Steve Williams of Southampton is given a player profile. His favourite music is Three Degrees, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart. If he wasn’t a footballer, he would have been a Brain Surgeon.

Andy Gray writes for Shoot, saying that Scotland are favourites to win at Wembley. England won the match 3-1, and claimed the Home Championship.

Christine Nettugh, an 18 year old Aberdeen fan writes in to complain about the Glasgow centric coverage of Scottish football in Shoot.

She won 3 pounds as a prize for Letter Of The Week.

The editor replies that a club like Aberdeen winning the league would be refreshing for Scottish football. Little did they know that Aberdeen’s profile would be raising in UK and European terms over the next secen years.