MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – SEPTEMBER 1992

Steve McManaman is mocked up as a superhero called McMana Man for the cover image, as he is described as English football’s superhero for the 1990s.

Ian Wright is interviewed and has modest ambitions for 92/93 – to get in the England team and to win the Premier League and FA Cup with Arsenal, predicting that he can make the most of the new backpass rule which stops goalkeepers picking the ball up from a backpass.

Steve McManaman is the subject of a double page feature, predicting he will become Liverpool’s greatest ever player, as well as tributes from the likes of Alan Hansen, Bruce Grobbelaar and Bradley Allen.

Don Howe is the subject of a profile, having just joined Chelsea as a coach, and his happy to be in that role rather than being a manager.

In world news, Marseille’s new signing Rudi Voeller believes that he can score the goals to win the European Cup for the French club.

Meanwhile, Manchester United have rejected a bid from Derby County to sign Bryan Robson, with the Rams hoping he would have had the same effect on them in the 90s as a similarly aged Dave Mackay did in the 1970s.

The forthcoming Premier League season is previewed, with all the Football Monthly journalists predicting that Arsenal will be champions in 1993.

Leeds United get a four page profile as they get set to defend their league title, looking at their success over the past four years under Howard Wilkinson.

The new Non League season is previewed, with Wycombe Wanderers being predicted to win promotion to the Football League.

Manchester City manager Peter Reid is interviewed, stating he stands by all his decisions, with City hoping to launch a title bid having come 5th in 1992.

In Scotland, the return of Trevor Steven to Rangers makes them favourites to win the title in 1993.

In competitions, you could win with Hummel, but you had a choice of a pair of boots or a replica shirt of either Benfica, Denmark or Real Madrid.

The preview of the new Irish League season predicts Glentoran to pip Linfield to the title and Ards to win the Irish Cup. Ards lost the Final while Linfield won the league.

In Republic of Ireland, there are concerns that easier access could affect attendances at domestic games, while Bohemians are predicted to win the league.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 26.12.1987

It’s the Christmas edition of Match, and Match columnist Emlyn Hughes is on the cover, dressed as Santa and giving his son Emlyn the 1988 Match Football Yearbook as a present.

His other child, Emma Lynn, was not on the cover. His kids are genuinely called that.

Alan Hansen gets a double page spread has he declares that Liverpool haven’t won anything yet, despite their unbeaten start to the season.

Emlyn Hughes gets asked whose Christmas party he would like to be invited to, and replies Margaret Thatcher so he could tell her that she has done so much for the country.

Paul McStay is doing just that at Celtic, committing his future to the club for the next five years after admitting he did consider leaving to play in English football.

The draw for the 1990 World Cup Qualifiers has been made, and Match previews the chances of the four home nations.

Davie Cooper uses his column to look back at Rangers title in in 1987, and plugs his own autobiography for anyone wanting ideas for a Christmas present.

In competitions, you could win a trip to the New Balance factory in Cumbria to see how football boots are made, and some signed Bryan Robson goodies.

Match does a feature on Kevin Kennedy, AKA Curly Watts from Coronation Street about his love of Manchester City.

With Liverpool unbeaten and looking certain to win the title, Match does an interview with former manager Bob Paisley, who describes this team as the most talented of his 40 year association with the club.

In foreign news, West German midielder Olaf Thon is subject to a transfer battle in Italy, with Juventus, Inter Milan and Sampdoria all wanting to sign him.

The magazine ends with a poster of Nottingham Forest players celebrating beating Manchester United in an indoor 6 a side tournament.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.5.1990

Today at Wembley, an expensively assembled and underachieving Manchester United side with a manager under pressure and living in the shadow of a retired Scottish legend arrive at Wembley to take on Crystal Palace in the FA Cup Final, hoping that winning the FA Cup will be the springboard to an era of success.

If that sounds familiar, it’s because we’ve been here before, in 1990.

As supporters sat in front of their TVs with only four channels, unless you had one of those new on the market satellie dishes, it’s possible they may have been reading Shoot’s preview, which had a split cover of Brian McClair and Ian Wright as Manchester United face Crystal Palace.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has full page profiles on central defenders set to be involved, with Andy Thorn of Palace prepared to play through the pain barrier, and Gary Pallister of United aiming to prove he won’t be a flop at United, after a British Record transfer from Middlesbrough.

In news, Celtic manager Billy McNeill is planning a clear out in the summer, while Manchester United are planning to sign Denis Irwin from Oldham Athletic, who Shoot have erroneously described as a Dubliner.

Bray Wanderers will be facing St Francis in the FAI Cup Final at Lansdowne Road, the game moved from Dalymount Park after the FAI anticipated Derry City to win their Semi-Final against Bray.

Midfielders aren’t ignored in the game at Wembley, with Shoot doing a profile of Bryan Robson and Andy Gray.

Celtic are facing Aberdeen in the Scottish Cup Final, and Shoot does a full page profile on Jacki Dzieckanowski, where he reveals his favourite band is Dire Straits.

Aberdeen are represented with a full page profile of Brian Irvine, who talks about his Christianity.

After scoring winning goals in the 3rd Round and Semi-Final, Mark Robins gets profiled.

In world news, Bayern Munich became the first German club to be floated on the Stock Exchange.

Austria are this week’s preview ahead of the World Cup in Italy, mostly focusing on Toni Polster.

Curiously, Shoot does a double page interview with Mark Bright and Ian Wright as they go out for a cycle.

Liam Brady gets profiled ahead of Republic Of Ireland’s friendly against Finland, but his appearance will only be symbolic, as it is a farewell in his own testimonial, having retired from international football the previous September.

It won’t stop him going to Italy, as he’ll be going to the World Cup as a pundit for RTE.

David Rocastle talks to Shoot about his frustration at injuries leading to his loss of form. The article is accompanied by a competition where you can win The Rocky Road To Success, a VHS tape profiling David Rocastle.

Liverpool’s recent title success gets profiled, with Alan Hansen claiming the club can dominate English football for the next twenty years.

The magazine ends with a double page profile of Scotland ahead of the World Cup in Italy.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 3.5.1980

The first tournament of the 1980s is approaching, Euro 80, and Shoot is attempting to do Ron Greenwood’s job for him by picking the England squad for this tournament.

Shoot gives a double page spread to this, with their selection, and the reasons for their selection.

While England’s players are heading to Italy, Ipswich Town’s players are heading to Hungary to appear in a film called Escape To Victory

In other news, Billy Humphries was considering making a comeback for Ards at the age of 42, while Aston Villa were keen on signing Mick Ferguson from Coventry.

In letters, Stephen Cochrane from Hartlepool writes in to suggest his local side will be a top flight club by 1987.

Scotland are also in international action, and Derek Johnstone uses his column to write about his hopes for an international. With Scotland not going to the European Championship, he can’t resist a dig at England by writing that this is how they must have felt sitting at home watching Scotland at the 1974 and 1978 World Cups.

Shoot interviews Manchester born pop star Andy Gibb about his love of Manchester United, saying that George Best was his hero. He supports United, but wants City to do well. In the interview, he says he doesn’t get to Old Trafford often, but visits Vicarage Road to see his local team Watford.

Gibb also reveals he has football matches in his local park with his three elder brothers Barry, Maurice and Robin (That’s the Bee Gees, by the way) who he describes as “Soccer mad”, which are videotaped, then they watch back when they get home.

West Germany captain Bernard Dietz gets a double page interview, where he states that England can win the competition. They were eliminated in the group stage while West Germany won the competition.

A possible future domestic opponent of Bernard Dietz is Liverpool midfielder Terry McDermott, who tells Shoot he is considering a move to a West German club.

Terry Venables uses his column to declare that players who do cynical fouls will never prosper in football.

As part of their build-up to Euro 80, Shoot looks at previous European Championships. This week, they look back at Euro 72.

In ads, Admiral take out a full page for their England kit and tracksuit range. One of the tracksuits is modelled by Trevor Francis. It’s unknown if it was purchased in Shepherd’s Bush.

Alan Hansen gets a full page profile where he reveals his favourite music is Billy Joel, and The Commodores, while his favourite other team is Manchester United.

In transfer news, Aston Villa manager Ron Saunders was fuming after Everton hijacked their bid to sign Dumbarton’s striker Graeme Sharp after they had agreed a fee with the Scottish club.

Shoot does a feature on Grimsby winger Mike Brolly, complete with a picture of him holding a brolly.

In other ads, there is an advert for a free Euro 80 sticker album, but not in Shoot, in two other publications – Roy Of The Rovers, and Tiger.

There is a poster of Celtic players and manager Billy McNeill celebrating winning the 1980 league title. They would soon look stupid as it was Aberdeen who claimed the trophy that season.

In international news, Bobby Robson is wanted by Barcelona to be their new manager. It would eventually take him 16 years to get the job. Meanwhile, one Spanish newspaper had a leftfield candidate for the post, Ian Paisley. It was a printing error as they got him confused with Liverpool manager Bob Paisley.

Andy Gray uses his column to suggest that there should be full-time referees in football.

The magazine ends on the back page with a poster of John Toshack in his Wales kit.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 2.6.1979

The summer of 1979 is almost upon us, but there are many things to be decided. Amazingly, the Home Championship game between England and Scotland, Scotland’s first visit to Wembley since the (in)famous 1977 game, taking more coverage on the cover ahead of Nottingham Forest’s European Cup Final against Malmo.

The game gets a double page spread, with Denis Law and Alan Ball talking about their memories of the fixture.

Phil Thompson gets a page to speak about his Anfield team mate and international opponent Alan Hansen, describing him as not having a weakness.

Northern Ireland and Wales aren’t left out with Gerry Armstrong and Malcolm Page both being posters, pictured in their international kits.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, heavy on international football with previews of vital European Championship Qualifiers for England (v Bulgaria), Scotland (v Norway), Northern Ireland (v Denmark) and Wales (v Malta), as well as an interview with Daniel Passarella.

There is also photos and reports of European Championship Qualifiers for Northern Ireland (v Bulgaria. Northern Ireland and England were in the same group), Scotland (v Norway) and Wales (v West Germany)

Euro 80 was the first European Championship with a pre-determined host, rather than selecting one of the four countries who won their Quarter-Finals.

Nottingham Forest and Malmo, contesting the European Cup Final, both get a double page spread, as well as a picture collage of how both teams reached the final.

Malmo had an English manager, Bob Houghton, described by Shoot as “The Brian Clough of Sweden”

In news, John Gregory is frustrated at being considered a utility, having worn every number from 2 to 11 in his 57 appearances for the club

Cliftonville get a mention with a short mention of Ciaran McCurry, who underline his potential with a “Near international display” in their Irish Cup Final win over Portadown.

Final league table for both Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland are published. Linfield were champions with 34 points from 22 games, 6 ahead of Glenavon in 2nd place.

It was 2 points for a win in them days. To translate it into 3 points for a win, Linfield would have finished 9 points clear of Glenavon with 48 points.

Steve Williams of Southampton is given a player profile. His favourite music is Three Degrees, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart. If he wasn’t a footballer, he would have been a Brain Surgeon.

Andy Gray writes for Shoot, saying that Scotland are favourites to win at Wembley. England won the match 3-1, and claimed the Home Championship.

Christine Nettugh, an 18 year old Aberdeen fan writes in to complain about the Glasgow centric coverage of Scottish football in Shoot.

She won 3 pounds as a prize for Letter Of The Week.

The editor replies that a club like Aberdeen winning the league would be refreshing for Scottish football. Little did they know that Aberdeen’s profile would be raising in UK and European terms over the next secen years.

EUROBOLLOCKS – THE KNOCKOUT STAGES

The group stages are over and the serious stuff was ready to begin, as eight sides battled to be crowned the Champions of Europe.

First up, were Czech Republic and Portugal, in a game that was known as The Cristiano Ronaldo Show.

Christiano Ronaldo was on a one-man mission to get Portugal into the Semi-Finals, which he succeeded in doing, winning the game, and the heart of Jonathan Pearce, in a show of fawning not seen on the BBC since they wheeled out a load of 40 something minor celebs to reminisce about the Bay City Rollers and David Cassidy et al on the ‘I Love The 70s’ series during the early 00s

To give you an idea of the mancrush, when Ronaldo scored, Pearce let out a scream not heard since Volcanosaurus obliterated Titanorator in the 1999 Robot Wars final.

Meanwhile, Portugal had a penalty shout in the first-half, to which Martin Keown commented “It’s just like WWE”

You have to admire Martin Keown for his research, as most football commentators describe penalty area manhandling as “It’s just like WWF” which as everyone knows, is no longer the name for the Wrestling organisation.

Next up, was Germany v Greece, or, Christmas for people who like doing shit topical jokes.

You see, Germany are meeting Greece in the Euros (And I fucking hate that term, it’s the European Championship) and off the pitch Germany and Greece are in some shit about the Euro, the currency, or something like that.

Having covered the FA Cup for the last four years, ITV have perfected the art of being patronisingly biased towards an underdog, and my word, ITV made sure Greece were the mid table League Two side of Euro 2012.

ITV were so biased, if Greece won, I would have expected them to cut back to the studio, and Adrian Chiles is dressed like he is in Dad’s Army, and proceeds to sing “Who do you think you are kidding Angela Merkel?”

Thankfully, Jamie Carragher wasn’t on punditry duty for that game, and thus, we were spared him talking about the nucleus of the Germany team that plays for Beyyynnn Mooonik.

Greece were heroically holding the Germans 0-0 for a long period of time, promptong co-commentator Jim Beglin to remark that “Germany are struggling to break down the Greece wall” which was surprising, as if any country specialised in breaking down a wall, it was Germany.

The following night, Spain met France in a game which was boring, which prompted a debate as to wether Spain are boring.

Spain are boring, but it’s boring to say that Spain are boring, but it’s boring to say it’s boring to say that Spain are boring.

I don’t know what position to take in this debate.

Sunday night, the one we are all waiting for, England v Italy.

Italy of course, are in decline with their worst ever team, there should only be one winner.

Before the match coverage had even started, modern journalism hit a nadir, as journalists queued up to provide live coverage of the England team getting off the bus at the stadium.

Yes, live coverage of people getting off a bus.

The pre-match analysis focused on the job Roy Hodgson had done with England, with Alan Hansen commenting on his ill-fated spell at Liverpool “It was the first time he’d managed a big club”

In Alan Hansen’s parallell universe, 18 time Siere A champions and 3 time European champions Inter Milan aren’t a big club.

Any big match these days isn’t complete without a wanky pre-match montage, and England v Italy didn’t disappoint. It wasn’t the worst one of the tournament though, as the BBC previewed England’s match against Sweden with a Joe Hart montage.

No harm to Joe Hart, but he’s a goalkeeper. You know a team is crap when the goalkeeper gets a montage. Prior to England’s opening game, the BBC had a montage of Stewart Downing prepared but had to scrap it.

It wasn’t the fact that Downing wasn’t selected for the game against France that saw the montage scrapped, but the fact that they couldn’t find any footage of him scoring or setting up a goal for Liverpool.

Italy is of course, the home of dirty tricks, and they pulled a real dirty trick by unveiling a player nobody had ever heard of before, Andrea Pirlo.

Apparantly, Andrea Pirlo has two European Cup winners medals and a World Cup winners medal, while Scott ‘Scotty’ Parker starred in a McDonalds advert. Amazingly, Pirlo turned out to be a bit better than England’s midfield.

England were in trouble, and Alan Shearer had a cunning plan …… that England should bring on Andy Carroll as “Italy won’t have played against a player like him”

In Alan Shearer’s parallell universe, there are no tall players in Siere A.

Ironcially, when Andy Carroll did come on, the only person who struggled with him was commentator Guy Mowbray, who kept calling him ‘Ashley Caroll’

And so to penalties, the most frustrating part was that Italy’s Christian Maggio didn’t take a penalty, purely for the commentator to say “So here’s to you Christian Maggio, a nation turns it’s lonely eyes to you …….”

So, England lost, and the end credit montage music was an acoustic cover version of ‘In The End’ by Linkin Park. Hadn’t England fans suffered enough?

The first Semi-Final between Spain and Portugal was boring, which wasn’t surprising as Spain are … wait, what’s the official line?

As the game was in extra-time, Martin Keown spoke for no-one when he commented “Nobody wants penalties”

Fuck off! When a game we don’t care who wins goes to extra-time, the thought of a penalty shoot-out is the only thing that keeps us going throughout extra-time.

The following night, as Italy went 2-0 up against Germany, Jonathan Pearce described it as “A major upset”

Yes, four time World Champions Italy now reduced to that status of a League Two team in the FA Cup 3rd Round.

Balotelli’s two goals against Germany made Alan Shearer look stupid (nothing new there) who dismissed him as “Having done nothing in his career”

When this was brought up in the build-up to the final, Shearer um ahhed that he meant at international level.

Fair point.

In an unrelated note, Lionel Messi has done nothing of note in his career*

(*In Irish League football, how many County Antrim Shields has he won?)

And so, to the game itself, Spain go 1-0 up through David Silva, prompting Guy Mowbray to quip “Silva strikes Gold for Spain”

No mater how many times you say it, it’s a pun which just doesn’t work.

I’m not even sure what the final score was, as I was too busy watching the match on CBBC.

Yes!!! CBBC showed the game live with various stars commentating on the game, including Hacker T Dog, who unsurprisingly made more sense than Mark Lawrenson and Andy Townsend combined.

If only this had existed in past European Championship finals.

Just imagine Saturday Swapshops’ Noel Edmonds and Keith Chegwin commentating on Panenka’s chip, or a Dream Team of Sarah Greene, Edd The Duck and Gordon The Gopher commentaing on Marco Van Basten’s goal against the Soviet Union.

And so, that was it, Euro 2012 was over, there was only one more battle …….. the end credit montage-off.

ITV had ‘Tonight Tonight’ by Smashing Pumpkins, while BBC went with an acoustic version of ‘Thriller’ by Michael Jackson that was so depressing, it was almost as if Mark Lawrenson was singing it.

Fair to say, ITV won the montage-off.

Gary Lineker signed out on “The reign of spain continues in Ukraine”

I’ll go fucking insane if Gary Lineker tries a joke like that again.