MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 29.9.1973

England, Scotland and Wales form part of a collage for the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot, ahead of a big week of international football. Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are in World Cup Qualifying action, while England face Austria in a friendly.

In news, Arsenal have used their matchday programme to defend the sale of Frank McLintock by stating that he wouldn’t be getting many first team games in the future.

After making a return to Manchester United’s team, Shoot have announced that George Best will be making a return to Shoot as a columnist.

Bobby Moore uses his column to state that England’s upcoming friendly is excellent preparation for the key World Cup Qualifier against Poland.

Shoot suggests that a defeat to Austria might be good for England as they lost a friendly to Austria in 1965 while preparing for the 1966 World Cup, which they won.

England are looking for a favour from Wales as they visit Poland, and Wales manager Dave Bowen promises that his team are going for the win.

Wlodi Lubanski of Poland is interviewed, stating that a win is far from guaranteed for Poland.

Kevin Keegan uses his column to state that the difference between players in England’s First and Fourth Divisions is Skill.

Ally Hunter of Scotland tells Shoot that the fans at Hampden must back the team all the way during their World Cup Qualifier against Czechoslovakia.

Pat Jennings tells Shoot about how Northern Ireland’s fanatical fans at Windsor Park give the side a 1-0 headstart. Unfortuntely, due to The Troubles, Northern Ireland are playing home matches in England, the upcoming World Cup Qualifier against Bulgaria will be at Hillsbrough.

The magazine ends with a poster collage of European stars from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Austria who will be facing UK teams this week.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.5.1977

David O’Leary is one of the cover stars as the 1976-1977 nears it’s finale.

Jack Charlton (Middlesbrough) and Johnny Giles (West Bromwich Albion) get a double page feature, as the two former Leeds players have left managerial positions in recent weeks.

Ray Kennedy gets a full page profile, as he aims to make English football history, aiming to become the first player to win the double twice, having been a part of Arsenal’s 1971 double winning team.

With Liverpool losing to Manchester United in that year’s FA Cup Final, the feat wasn’t achieve until various Manchester United players did it in 1996, with some more doing it in 1999 (Peter Schmeichel, Denis Irwin, Roy Keane and Ryan Giggs winning it three times)

Ashley Cole and Nicholas Anelka are the only players to win the double with two different clubs, after Kennedy was denied this achievement.

Shoot does a double page spread, offering Martin Peters, Pat Rice and Howard Kendall an opportunity to reflect on the season, and why their respective sides didn’t win a trophy.

Gerry Francis uses his column to suggest that anybody wanting to be a manager in England should get the relevant coaching and management qualifications, similar to the structure in West Germany.

In news, Arsenal manager Terry Neill has denied a story in Shoot that Frank Stapleton and Liam Brady are on their way to Liverpool. Middlesbrough midfielder Graeme Souness is unsettled at Ayresome Park

St Mirren manager Alex Ferguson has been fined £25 for comments to the referee after his side were eliminated from the Scottish Cup by Motherwell.

Aston Villa goalkeeper John Burridge gets a full page profile about facing penalties.

In the centre pages, there is a poster of the Aston Villa team, including the League Cup, which they won in 1977.

John Greig uses his column to explain why Rangers didn’t win the league.

Sheffield Wednesday’s teenage goalkeeper Chris Turner gets interviewed, having broke into the team and become a regular of the team he supported growing up.

In world news, Idi Amin is described as “The Generous General”, having rewarded the national team with a free holiday in Libya as a reward for winning the East African Challenge Cup.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 16.4.1983

Jimmy Case of Brighton is the cover star of this edition of Match, previewing the FA Cup Semi-Finals, where Brighton face Sheffield Wednesday while Arsenal look to avenge their League Cup Semi-Final defeat to Manchester United by beating them in the FA Cup.

Scottish Cup Semi-Finals are also previewed, with Match dubbing them “The big Tartan Ties”.

As you open the magazine, there are two double page previews of the two FA Cup Semi-Finals.

In adverts, Steve Coppell is used to promote books on careers advice for people whose goal is a good job.

Alex McLeish is the subject of this week’s profile, revealing that his favourite singer is Phil Collins and his footballing ambition is to win a European trophy with Aberdeen.

The two Semi-Finals in Scotland are profiled, with Hibs star Alan Rough predicting that Celtic will beat Aberdeen and that Rangers will beat St Mirren.

Graeme Souness begins his column by apologising to Brighton fans, as he believes that they will lose their FA Cup Semi-Final to Sheffield Wednesday.

Gary Shaw of Aston Villa is doing predictions, up against a Villa fan from Essex. Shaw hopes that Wednesday beat Brighton in the FA Cup Semi-Final as Wednesday have a couple of ex Villa players.

Meanwhile, Frans Thijssen is leaving Ipswich Town to join Vancouver Whitecaps, and he looks back at his time in England.

Match visits the home of Sheffield Wednesday star Andy McCullough, photographing him as he rides a neighbour’s horse through rural Derbyshire.

The magazine ends with a profile of new Scotland cap Richard Gough, who revealed that he almost quit football after being homesick for South Africa, where he grew up.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 5.8.1989

Paul McGrath, in action for Republic Of Ireland, is the cover star, as Match leads with the headline “FORCED OUT!”, with McGrath having just left Manchester United for Aston Villa.

As you open the magazine, there is an interview with McGrath, who tells Match that Manchester United’s search for a Central Defender left him with no option but to sign for Aston Villa, almost a year after a move to Tottenham Hotspur broke down.

When you turn over the page, there is an interview with Norman Whiteside, who feels his move to Goodison Park will help his ambition of winning a league title.

With a new season about to start in Scotland, Mo Johnston tells Match he wants to win over the Rangers fans, having previously played for Celtic, adding that he is confident of Rangers making an impression in the European Cup, despite being drawn against Bayern Munich in the group stages.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs goalkeeper Andy Goram has received a dressing down for leaving Hibs pre-season training to play international Cricket for Scotland.

Arsenal will be playing Independiente in a friendly in Miami, which will be broadcast live on ITV that weekend.

Another English club on tour in 1989 were Ipswich Town, becoming the first English club to tour the Soviet Union.

Division Four gets previewed, with both Ian Muir of Tranmere and Tony Grealish of Rotherham expecting Scunthorpe United to win the division in 1990. They finished 11th.

In ads, John Barnes and Graeme Souness were advertising Diadora, while Jennifer Saunders was advertising Nat West.

Match’s cut out A-Z Fixture Lists for English clubs this week cover P to S

Mick Quinn has just signed for Newcastle, but tells Match of his frustration at being priced out of a move to a top flight club due to Portsmouth’s valuation of him.

Neil Webb advertises Nike, and Chris Waddle tells Match he is enjoying life at Marseille.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 23.4.1994

It’s Derby Day in Manchester, and this is reflected with Paul Walsh and Andrei Kanchelskis appearing on the cover of Shoot.

As you open the magazine, there is a poster of Liverpool’s Rob Jones, Steve Nicol and Julian Dicks.

United’s recent FA Cup Semi-final Replay win over Oldham gets a double page spread, with most of the focus being on Andrei Kanchelskis and his goal.

Having just made his England debut, Darren Anderton is already worried that he might not be able to add to his number of caps in future, if Tottenham Hotspur are unsuccessful in their battle against relegation.

Over the page, there is a poster of Neil Webb.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot does a double page feature focusing on Nigeria’s chances, having qualified for the first time.

In 1994, Shoot had a columnist called Metro, who was the reigning Nintendo UK Champion. He reviewed video games. This week, he reviewed Ryan Giggs Champions World Class Soccer.

In adverts, there were adverts for World Cup Cards, made by a company called Uppper Deck.

Paul Gascoigne had recently suffered a serious and potentially career ending injury. Shoot dedicates a page to this, with a host of footballers offering messages of support to him.

In foreign news, Inter Milan want to offload Dennis Bergkamp and replace him with Chris Sutton, while AC Milan want to buy back Ruud Gullit, a year after selling him after they thought he was too old.

Arsenal’s win over Paris St Germain in the European Cup Winners Cup Semi-Final gets a double page spread. It was a bittersweet night for Arsenal, as Ian Wright would miss the final through suspension.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot has a series previewing it, with a comic book style full page look at past tournaments. This week featured the 1950 tournament.

Rangers and Dundee United have won through to the Scottish Cup Final, and this gets a double page feature, with Rangers aiming to make history by becoming the first team to win back to back trebles.

The Manchester Derby gets previewed on the final pages, with an interview with City’s Michael Vonk.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.6.1986

Action from the opening game of Mexico 86 between Bulgaria and Italy is on the cover of Shoot, as they bring you the latest news from the ongoing World Cup.

England are hoping to win it for the first time since 1966, and their winning captain that day, Bobby Moore, is now a columnist for Shoot, and he lists the players that have impressed him in the opening games, such as Socrates, Maradona, Platini, Papin, Boniek, as well as Randy Regan and Bruce Wilson of Canada.

Bryan Robson is hoping to emulate his fellow Shoot columnist by lifting the trophy, but it hasn’t got off to the best of starts, as he writes of his frustration of England failing to win their first two games, but predicts England will reach the knock out stages. Beside his column is an advert for New Balance, which he endorses.

There is a double page interview with Jim Leighton, where he reveals that he didn’t want to be a goalkeeper.

News from Mexico includes that Fenerbache made approached Franz Beckenbauer to quit West Germany and become manager of Fenerbache, while in Italy, there is a potential match fixing scandal about to blow open.

Italy’s group opponents Bulgaria haven’t made many friends, by holding training behind closed doors and having armed guards outside their training facilities.

Shoot’s man in Mexico, Bill Day brands England’s performances “A disgrace”, while being complimentary about Northern Ireland, despite losing 2-1 to Spain.

Ray Daly from County Offaly writes to Jimmy Greaves to suggest that when Ron Atkinson’s inevitable departure as Manchester United manager is confirmed, the job should go to United legend Lou Macari.

There is a round-up of results from the 1985-1986 Scottish League seasons, with Steve Cowan of Hibs being top scorer, 2 ahead of Brian McClair. Both men would go on to win league titles outside their native country, Cowan with Portadown and McClair with Manchester United.

Outside of the World Cup, Republic Of Ireland are making progress under Jack Charlton, already lifting a trophy by winning a triangular tournament in Iceland against the hosts and Czechoslovakia.

Steve Hodge gets a full page profile having broken into the England squad in time to head to Mexico. A potential Aston Villa team-mate of Hodge’s is John Hewitt, in a contract dispute with Aberdeen, which gets a full page feature. Discussions are on hold at the moment, due to Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson being in Mexico in his role as Scotland manager.

Nigel Winterburn of Wimbledon, looking forward to playing in the top flight for the first time, gets a full page interview, where he credits his former manager at Birmingham, Jim Smith, with saving his career.

There is also a full page profile of League of Ireland champions Shamrock Rovers.

In club news, Alex Ferguson spoke of his dislike for agents after Eric Black moved to Metz, while Liam Brady was leaving unsubtle hints for Arsenal to buy him back.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.1.1972

It’s the early weeks of 1972 and Shoot has gone Cup Crazy, as this week’s edition has a free wallchart for you to chart the progress of the Scottish Cup and FA Cup.

Unfortunately, there was no such chart for the Irish Cup or Welsh Cup.

The chart had an impressive list of admirers in the shape of Bobby Moore, George Best and Alan Ball. Maybe not that surprising that they endorsed it, as they were all Shoot columnists at that time.

George Best went as far to describe it as “Definitely one of the finest charts i’ve ever seen”

Shoot has a Crosstalk colum where two footballers debaate a topical subject. This week’s one saw Alan Mullery (Tottenham Hotspur) and David Nish (Leicester City) debating if you need luck to win the FA Cup.

Mullery would have greater knowledge of that, having won the trophy in 1967, while Nish was a losing finalist in 1969.

Bobby Moore’s colum talks about how he has helped out Luton Town by appearing at social functions, but is determied to put them out of the FA Cup, as they were West Ham’s 3rd Round opponents.

Moore predicts that Arsenal and Leeds will be the two sides most likely to lift the trophy, and so it proved, with Leeds beating Arsenal 1-0 in the final.

Shoot does a double page spread on four top flight clubs that have never won the FA Cup – Coventry City, Crystal Palace, Ipswich Town and Stoke City.

Within 15 years, Coventry (1987) and Ipswich (1978) had lifted the trophy, while Crystal Palace (1990) and Stoke City (2011) have lost a final since then.

George Best’s column comments about how he wants to win the cup in 1972. George Best never won the FA Cup in his career.

Shoot does a double page spread on double winners Arsenal, asking if they can repeat their League and FA Cup success of 1971 a year later.

It wasn’t to be for Arsenal as they finished 5th, and as previously mentioned, lost the FA Cup Final 1-0 to Leeds. Derby County, led by Brian Clough, were Champions that season.

Frank McClintock talks about that final against Liverpool, revealing he was shatterd at the end of a busy week that saw him win the League, Player Of The Year, and get a Scotland recall.

Gordon Banks gets a player profile where he reveals he likes holidays and hates shaving, fog and football hooliganism. The person he would most like to meet in the world is Raquel Welch.

Aberdeen, Scottish Cup winners in 1970, then league runners-up in 1971 get a double page spread look at their recent upturn in form.

John Tudor of Newcastle United gets interviewed, talking about his team-mate Malcolm MacDonald, revealing that he even pressurises himself to score in training, such is his lust for goals.

There is also a double page spread looking at Pele’s career, part of a series, as this as title Part One.

Trevor Hockey of Sheffield United also gets a career profile, while there is a poster of Birmingham City’s Bob Hatton on the back cover.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6.2.1971

Action from a match between Stoke City and Manchester City is the cover image as the the 1970-1971 season approaches it’s final stages, with Shoot asking if Leeds or Arsenal will be Champions.

Shoot does a double page spread where they interview players such as Nobby Stiles, Glyn Pardoe, John Sissons, Bobby Gould and Mark Lazarus about what it is like to score at Wembley.

Even though he is a defender, Bobby Moore uses his column to declare that matches are won in midfield, and commenting on who his favourite midfieldes are.

Joe McBride of Dunfermline Athletic answers questions submitted by Shoot readers, with Shoot giving a list of upcoming interviewees, including Peter Shilton, Johnny Giles and Steve Perryman.

Peter Shilton gets given a full page by Shoot to explain how he manages to kick the ball so far up the field.

There is a poster of Sunderland defender Colin Todd.

Scotland are in action against Belgium in a European Championship Qualifier, with Shoot noting that history was on Scotland’s side, as they had a better record in head to head meetings between the two sides.

Belgium won the match 3-0. Scotland and Belgium would see a lot of each other over the next 16 years, being paired together in Qualification for 1980, 1984 and 1988, as well as 1972.

England were also in European Championship action, away to Malta, with Shoot’s preview pointing out that Malta have the ability to hold out against England. England won the match 1-0.

Shoot previews the title run-in between Leeds and Arsenal, listing their remaining fixtures but sitting on the fence with regards to who will win it.

Arsenal won the league that season, finishing 1 point clear of 2nd place Leeds, and then added the FA Cup, becoming the 2nd side in the 20th Century to win the League and FA Cup double.

John Hollins is interviewed, stating that he studies Bobby Charltopn and Billy Bremner in an attempt to be a better player, stating that he wants to be part of England’s squad for the 1974 World Cup.

Dick Staite of Clyde is interviewed, and he states that the person he would like to meet most is Alexander Dubcek, former Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia.

Alan Ball uses his column to state that stay away fans are affecting team morales, as players find it difficult to play in front of empty stands.

Peter Simpson previews Arsenal’s trip to Anfield, claiming that his side feel unbeatable.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 30.4.1988

Luton Town are the cover stars of Shoot, as the 1988 League Cup Final gets reviewed.

Luton’s 3-2 win over Arsenal gets three pages of coverage, with a full page dedicated to penalty save hero Andy Dibble, who is attracting transfer interest after deputising for the injured Les Sealey.

Also celebrating a trophy win are newly crowned League Champions Liverpool, which gets a full page feature.

Norman Whiteside looks set to leave Manchester United after a contract dispute. Whiteside also has a go at Jimmy Hill for his scrutinising of tackles by non English players in the aftermath of criticism by Hill of a tackle by Whiteside during a recent game at Anfield.

Shoot prints out a handy guide for the Football League Play-Offs, in their second season.

John Barnes uses his column to pay tribute to Peter Beardsley.

Talking of Peter Beardsley, he is modelling the new England kit for Euro 88.

And talking of Euro 88, there is a four page profile of Spain.

In world news, Inter Milan want to sign Lothar Matthaus, while FIFA are threatening to take the 1990 World Cup away from Italy and award it to West Germany after the preparations have fallen behind schedule.

There is a double page feature on two teenage players who have broken through in Division One – Michael O’Neill and Alan Shearer.

Rangers fans who love dogs were in for a treat as Shoot do a feature on Ally McCoist and Graham Roberts love of dogs.

Bryan Gunn gets interviewed and tells Shoot that Norwich players are responsible for the poor run of form that saw the departure of manager Ken Brown.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which has a free Euro 88 sticker book.

The magazine ends with a feature on John Charles Testimonial Match, which saw Ian Rush and Michel Platini make guest appearances for Leeds United, though Rush would go on to sign for Leeds eight years later.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.12.1989

Peter Beardsley, playing for England, is the cover star of Match, as England, Scotland and Republic Of Ireland have discovered their group opponents in the 1990 World Cup.

1989-1990 has been a season of violence on the pitch in English football, with Sports Minister Colin Moynihan calling for players who misbehave to be arrested. Bryan Robson and Terry Butcher hit back against such a suggestion.

England and Republic Of Ireland face each other in the 1990 World Cup groups, having met in Euro 88, while Scotland also face familiar opponents, Brazil, who they met in the 1982 World Cup group stages.

Gary Shaw, currently playing in Austria, is hoping to return to the Football League, but is still struggling from the effects of a knee injury.

Ajax are eyeing up English clubs for potential friendlies as they are currently serving a UEFA ban.

One English club playing a high profile friendly is Arsenal, who travel to Ibrox to take on Rangers in an Unofficial British Championship, with Arsenal midfielder Brian Marwood saying this match is an opportunity to enhance Arsenal’s reputation.

There is a feature on competition winners who got to meet the England team.

John MacPhail of Sunderland tells Shoot he still has the legs to take part in Sunderland’s promotion battle at the age of 34.

Talking on veterans, there is a full page profile of QPR’s midfield duo of Ray Wilkins and Peter Reid, both well into their 30s.