MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.6.1986

Action from the opening game of Mexico 86 between Bulgaria and Italy is on the cover of Shoot, as they bring you the latest news from the ongoing World Cup.

England are hoping to win it for the first time since 1966, and their winning captain that day, Bobby Moore, is now a columnist for Shoot, and he lists the players that have impressed him in the opening games, such as Socrates, Maradona, Platini, Papin, Boniek, as well as Randy Regan and Bruce Wilson of Canada.

Bryan Robson is hoping to emulate his fellow Shoot columnist by lifting the trophy, but it hasn’t got off to the best of starts, as he writes of his frustration of England failing to win their first two games, but predicts England will reach the knock out stages. Beside his column is an advert for New Balance, which he endorses.

There is a double page interview with Jim Leighton, where he reveals that he didn’t want to be a goalkeeper.

News from Mexico includes that Fenerbache made approached Franz Beckenbauer to quit West Germany and become manager of Fenerbache, while in Italy, there is a potential match fixing scandal about to blow open.

Italy’s group opponents Bulgaria haven’t made many friends, by holding training behind closed doors and having armed guards outside their training facilities.

Shoot’s man in Mexico, Bill Day brands England’s performances “A disgrace”, while being complimentary about Northern Ireland, despite losing 2-1 to Spain.

Ray Daly from County Offaly writes to Jimmy Greaves to suggest that when Ron Atkinson’s inevitable departure as Manchester United manager is confirmed, the job should go to United legend Lou Macari.

There is a round-up of results from the 1985-1986 Scottish League seasons, with Steve Cowan of Hibs being top scorer, 2 ahead of Brian McClair. Both men would go on to win league titles outside their native country, Cowan with Portadown and McClair with Manchester United.

Outside of the World Cup, Republic Of Ireland are making progress under Jack Charlton, already lifting a trophy by winning a triangular tournament in Iceland against the hosts and Czechoslovakia.

Steve Hodge gets a full page profile having broken into the England squad in time to head to Mexico. A potential Aston Villa team-mate of Hodge’s is John Hewitt, in a contract dispute with Aberdeen, which gets a full page feature. Discussions are on hold at the moment, due to Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson being in Mexico in his role as Scotland manager.

Nigel Winterburn of Wimbledon, looking forward to playing in the top flight for the first time, gets a full page interview, where he credits his former manager at Birmingham, Jim Smith, with saving his career.

There is also a full page profile of League of Ireland champions Shamrock Rovers.

In club news, Alex Ferguson spoke of his dislike for agents after Eric Black moved to Metz, while Liam Brady was leaving unsubtle hints for Arsenal to buy him back.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.1.1972

It’s the early weeks of 1972 and Shoot has gone Cup Crazy, as this week’s edition has a free wallchart for you to chart the progress of the Scottish Cup and FA Cup.

Unfortunately, there was no such chart for the Irish Cup or Welsh Cup.

The chart had an impressive list of admirers in the shape of Bobby Moore, George Best and Alan Ball. Maybe not that surprising that they endorsed it, as they were all Shoot columnists at that time.

George Best went as far to describe it as “Definitely one of the finest charts i’ve ever seen”

Shoot has a Crosstalk colum where two footballers debaate a topical subject. This week’s one saw Alan Mullery (Tottenham Hotspur) and David Nish (Leicester City) debating if you need luck to win the FA Cup.

Mullery would have greater knowledge of that, having won the trophy in 1967, while Nish was a losing finalist in 1969.

Bobby Moore’s colum talks about how he has helped out Luton Town by appearing at social functions, but is determied to put them out of the FA Cup, as they were West Ham’s 3rd Round opponents.

Moore predicts that Arsenal and Leeds will be the two sides most likely to lift the trophy, and so it proved, with Leeds beating Arsenal 1-0 in the final.

Shoot does a double page spread on four top flight clubs that have never won the FA Cup – Coventry City, Crystal Palace, Ipswich Town and Stoke City.

Within 15 years, Coventry (1987) and Ipswich (1978) had lifted the trophy, while Crystal Palace (1990) and Stoke City (2011) have lost a final since then.

George Best’s column comments about how he wants to win the cup in 1972. George Best never won the FA Cup in his career.

Shoot does a double page spread on double winners Arsenal, asking if they can repeat their League and FA Cup success of 1971 a year later.

It wasn’t to be for Arsenal as they finished 5th, and as previously mentioned, lost the FA Cup Final 1-0 to Leeds. Derby County, led by Brian Clough, were Champions that season.

Frank McClintock talks about that final against Liverpool, revealing he was shatterd at the end of a busy week that saw him win the League, Player Of The Year, and get a Scotland recall.

Gordon Banks gets a player profile where he reveals he likes holidays and hates shaving, fog and football hooliganism. The person he would most like to meet in the world is Raquel Welch.

Aberdeen, Scottish Cup winners in 1970, then league runners-up in 1971 get a double page spread look at their recent upturn in form.

John Tudor of Newcastle United gets interviewed, talking about his team-mate Malcolm MacDonald, revealing that he even pressurises himself to score in training, such is his lust for goals.

There is also a double page spread looking at Pele’s career, part of a series, as this as title Part One.

Trevor Hockey of Sheffield United also gets a career profile, while there is a poster of Birmingham City’s Bob Hatton on the back cover.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6.2.1971

Action from a match between Stoke City and Manchester City is the cover image as the the 1970-1971 season approaches it’s final stages, with Shoot asking if Leeds or Arsenal will be Champions.

Shoot does a double page spread where they interview players such as Nobby Stiles, Glyn Pardoe, John Sissons, Bobby Gould and Mark Lazarus about what it is like to score at Wembley.

Even though he is a defender, Bobby Moore uses his column to declare that matches are won in midfield, and commenting on who his favourite midfieldes are.

Joe McBride of Dunfermline Athletic answers questions submitted by Shoot readers, with Shoot giving a list of upcoming interviewees, including Peter Shilton, Johnny Giles and Steve Perryman.

Peter Shilton gets given a full page by Shoot to explain how he manages to kick the ball so far up the field.

There is a poster of Sunderland defender Colin Todd.

Scotland are in action against Belgium in a European Championship Qualifier, with Shoot noting that history was on Scotland’s side, as they had a better record in head to head meetings between the two sides.

Belgium won the match 3-0. Scotland and Belgium would see a lot of each other over the next 16 years, being paired together in Qualification for 1980, 1984 and 1988, as well as 1972.

England were also in European Championship action, away to Malta, with Shoot’s preview pointing out that Malta have the ability to hold out against England. England won the match 1-0.

Shoot previews the title run-in between Leeds and Arsenal, listing their remaining fixtures but sitting on the fence with regards to who will win it.

Arsenal won the league that season, finishing 1 point clear of 2nd place Leeds, and then added the FA Cup, becoming the 2nd side in the 20th Century to win the League and FA Cup double.

John Hollins is interviewed, stating that he studies Bobby Charltopn and Billy Bremner in an attempt to be a better player, stating that he wants to be part of England’s squad for the 1974 World Cup.

Dick Staite of Clyde is interviewed, and he states that the person he would like to meet most is Alexander Dubcek, former Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia.

Alan Ball uses his column to state that stay away fans are affecting team morales, as players find it difficult to play in front of empty stands.

Peter Simpson previews Arsenal’s trip to Anfield, claiming that his side feel unbeatable.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.12.1985

Frank McAvennie is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, having just broken into the Scotland team.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has a double page feature on Kerry Dixon, where it is revealed that Spurs turned down the chance to sign him.

Garry Birtles is interviewed, having just been converted into a central defender, and is loving it, despite the fear of giving away a penalty.

Terry Gibson tells Shoot that he does not expect Manchester United to win the league, which will have been awkward when he signed for United later that season.

The IFA have stated that they expect to make £250,000 from their appearance at next year’s World Cup in Mexico.

There is continuing talk of a Super League in English football. Shoot asks various football stars about the way forward. Gary Stevens (the Spurs one, not the Everton one) suggests games on Sundays, Don Mackay of Coventry wants 6 divisions of 16 teams, while Mark Hughes wants less games.

Sunderland v Portsmouth is billed as the big game of the weekend, and Shoot focuses on the mutual admiration between respective managers Alan Ball and Lawrie McMenemy.

Scotland’s World Cup Qualifier against Australia gets a double page spread, focusing on Scotland’s strikers at opposite ends of their career – Frank McAvennie making his debut, and Kenny Dalglish winning his 99th cap.

Talking of Scotland, Shoot looks at youth team boss Andy Roxburgh, and his globetrotting exploits in 1985.

Most of those, were scouting trips. Talking of scouting, Shoot scouts Steve McMahon of Liverpool, describing him as a new Graeme Souness.

McAvennie is mentioned again, in Ian Rush’s column, who describes his as a great goalscorer, adding that his Wales team-mate Mark Hughes isn’t a great goalscorer.

Jimmy Greaves gives his Star Letter award to Norwich City supporting brothers championing Steve Bruce’s case for a place in the England squad.

Bryab Robson uses his column to reveal that the signing of Colin Gibson has lifted the mood of everybody at Old Trafford.

Bobby Moore has enlisted the help of various former West Ham team-mates as he aims for success as Southend United manager. The club are currently making plans to move to a new stadium at Rochford.

Leeds United get a Club Profile and Team Poster.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT MEXICO 86 SPECIAL

At this moment 30 years ago, Italy and Bulgaria players were walking onto the pitch at Estadio Azteca in Mexico City for the opening game of Mexico 86.

The game was broadcast live on the BBC. As people sat in front of their TVs awaiting the month of football to come, it’s possible they may have been reading Shoot’s 1986 World Cup Preview guide, costing 75p.

With three UK teams in the finals (something that wouldn’t happen again until Euro 2016), Shoot capitalised on this by having a player from Scotland (Gordon Strachan), England (Bryan Robson) and Northern Ireland (Norman Whiteside) all holding the World Cup trophy.

All three were playing for the same club in 1986, so it was obviously convenient for them to arrange the photoshoot.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page editorial saying “Go get em lads”, wishing the three UK teams good luck.

There is then a double page TV guide, but it only covers the opening match, and the home nations group games. For the record, Northern Ireland and Scotland had two live games on ITV and one on the BBC, while England had two games on the BBC and one on ITV.

Trevor Francis gets four pages to write about who he thinks will be the stars in Mexico, predicting big things from Hugo Sanchez, Rudi Voeller, Preben Elkjaer, Diego Maradona, Michel Platini, Rinat Dasaev, Zico and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge, Enzo Scifo, Daniel Passarella, Antonio Cabrini, Zibi Boniek and Michael Laudrup.

Quite a lot of those players were based in Serie A, where Francis was playing his club football.

Mick Channon gets two pages to assess the three home nations, predicting Bryan Robson to lead England to the Quarter-Finals (They would reach that stage, but Robson would be at home injured), Scotland to reach the Second Round (Group stage exit) and Northern Ireland to reach the knockout stages (group stage exit)

Channon also commented that he was recently in Belfast to play in a testimonial game for George Dunlop.

Mal Donaghy gets a lot of praise from Channon, stating he would walk into England and Scotland’s teams, comparing him to Bobby Moore.

For the whole tournament, he expected Argentina to beat Brazil in the final.

Tony Roche gets a double page spread to assess the rest of the European teams, stating that Denmark could take the competition by storm, comparing them to Holland’s team of the 70s.

There is a full page round up of the results and tables from the European groups.

Peter Reid gets interviewed with the headline “ON YER BIKE JOAN COLLINS”. In case you’re wondering why, England will be warming up in America, staying in a hotel in Denver which is used to film scenes for the TV show Dynasty.

Reid comments on the progress in his career between World Cups, having just avoided relegation to the Third Division with Bolton in 1982, he was now challenging for trophies with Everton.

Shoot canvassed journalists from around the world for their opinion, and the consensus was that Brazil would repeat their success in Mexico they had in 1970.

Bobby Moore writes about his experiences at the 1970 World Cup, advising the players that playing Snooker will be a good way to relieve the boredom in the hotel room.

Charlie Nicholas gets four pages to write about his Scotland team-mates, where he reveals he shares a room with Steve Nicol. They are good mates, but Nicholas doesn’t share Nicol’s love of Status Quo.

There is a double page interview with the three UK managers, Bobby Robson (England), Alex Ferguson (Scotland) and Billy Bingham (Northern Ireland)

Ferguson and Robson predict Brazil will win the trophy, while Bingham shies away from predicting a winner.

Bryan Robson writes a two page article where he predicts England will reach the Semi-Finals, and that Gary Lineker will be England’s biggest star in Mexico, comparing him to Jimmy Greaves.

There are two pages then dedicated to the South American challenge, written by Tony Roche.

Shoot has bagged an interview with Diego Maradona, who says England look good, Northern Ireland have a chance of reaching the knock-out stage, while Scotland are in the toughest group. He didn’t predict Morocco to upset anyone.

The main question asked in Northern Ireland’s preview is where the goals will come from. Billy Bingham has a lot of praise for Norman Whiteside, predicting him to be a regular Northern Ireland player for the next decade.

Jimmy Greaves has two pages of letters, where a Notts County fan predicts Algeria to win because of Rachid Harkouk, to which Greaves sarcastically responds.

There is a full page dedicate to free-kick experts, listing the best players with this skill, including Platini, Hoddle, Cooper and Molby.

As well as looking forward, Shoot also looks back at England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s World Cup history.

There are two pages dedicated to Jock Stein, who was Scotland manager during the qualifying campaign until his death after the game against Wales in September 1985, with tributes from Alex Ferguson and Billy McNeill.

There is a competition where you can win a Sinclair ZX Spectrum and Ray Clemence World Cup video game.

The preview ends with an infographic of all the team’s kits.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6th MARCH 1993

This edition of The Magazine Archive goes back to 1993, when England had three players in Siere A, and the cover focuses on the most successful export, David Platt, offering his advice for the most high profile, Paul Gascoigne.

The editorial pays tribute to Bobby Moore, who had recently died. Printing deadlines had meant they didn’t have the opportunity to publish a full tribute, and promised to do one in the following week’s edition.

It is the weekend of the FA Cup Quarter-Finals, and shoot do a double page interview with Chris Waddle and Darren Anderton, and another with Jimmy Carter and Dave Bassett.

Ian Porterfield had recently become the first football manager in history ever to be sacked (Well, in the Premier League era) and Shoot does a statistical analysis on the number of sackings in English football.

Meanwhile, Les Ferdinand, who recently broke into the England team,gets a double page spread to talk about his football hero, Cyrille Regis.

Two pages are also given to an investigation into ticket touting, having recently tried to use this method to get tickets for the Coca-Cola Cup Semi-Final between Arsenal and Crystal Palace.

There is also a survey for readers to send in responses about safe

Nick Barmby is touted as a future star ahead of the Under 19 World Cup. He scored the first goal of the regimes of two England managers (Glenn Hoddle and Sven Goran Eriksson) and went to two European Championships, and is currently “Cutting his teeth” as a manager with Hull City.

Other names in the squad for that tournament include : Steve Watson, David Unsworth, Nicky Butt, Alan Thompson, Julian Joachim, Ian Pearce, Dominic Matteo and Graham Fenton.

Dominic Matteo went on to play full international football for Scotland.

Adie Mike went on to play for Cliftonville.

In Scotland, it’s also Quarter-Final weekend, with the feature game being Arbroath v Rangers, with Arbroath supporters posing with false beards alongside (Bearded) manager (and Celtic legend) Danny McGrain in the preview.

David Platt gets a double page interview where he offers advice to Gazza on how he can adapt to living in Italy.

There is also a competition to win a signed David Platt football and dinner in his restaurant (It doesn’t say where it is though)

There is advert for the following week’s edition, focusing on the Title Showdown at Old Trafford between Manchester United and Aston Villa.

Posters that week included Marco Gabbiadini/Paul Kitson/Paul Simpson, Frank Rijkaard,