MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 1.7.1989

Gary Lineker is the cover star of Match, as he makes a return to England after three years in Barcelona, signing for Tottenham Hotspur.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on the transfer, with Lineker turning down moves to Everton and Monaco when deciding to sign for Spurs. There is also a mock diary, done in the style of Adrian Mole’s diary.

There is a double page feature on another England striker, Steve Bull, who scored more hat-tricks (four) than any other player in English football in 1988-1989.

Strikers were very much a theme of this issue, with a full page profile of Everton’s new signing Mike Newell, who has a point to prove after being rejected by Liverpool as a youngster.

A Striker who isn’t moving anywhere is Brian McClair, who uses his column to deny he will be returning to Celtic, as well as praising Manchester United’s signings of Neil Webb and Mike Phelan.

In international news, Ruud Gullit and Frank Rijkaard avoided a fatal plane crash when they were refused permission by AC Milan to appear in an exhibition game in Surinam. The plane taking the players playing in the game crashed.

Karl-Heize Rummenigge announced his retirement, while AC Milan want to sign Gianluca Vialli. Juventus have also made a signing, 11 year old Fabio Alderucci.

There is a double page feature on players not leaving Old Firm clubs, with Ally McCoist staying at Rangers despite interest from Arsenal, Everton and Atalanta, and Chris Morris turning down QPR and Leeds to stay at Celtic.

There is a full page feature on the sides with the worst discipline in England and Scotland, Portsmouth being the “winners” with seven red cards.

Match’s Player Of The Year vote saw what was described as a “50s revival”, with most of the winners being veterans born in the 1950s.

In ads, Ian Rush is advertising Nike, putting snooker chalk on his boot.

Gary Waddock, now playing for Charleroi in Belgium, tells Match of his dream of playing for Republic of Ireland at the 1990 World Cup in Italy, just two years after retiring through injury.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.4.1988

Terry Butcher is the cover star of Shoot as he makes a timely return from injury, with Euro 88 just around the corner.

As you open the magazine, Adrian Heath tells Shoot of his dismay at being singled out as a scapegoat by Everton fans when things don’t go well.

Cover star Butcher uses his column to declare he was back from injury, and that if he came through Rangers match against Hibs unscathed, he will be aiming for an England recall for the friendly in Hungary.

Butcher also defends his manager at Rangers, Graeme Souness, who has faced press criticism for a tackle he made in a European Cup tie against Steau Bucharest.

The Football League celebrates it’s centenary with a 16 team tournament at Wembley decided by the highest scorers in each four divisions. This competitions gets a four page profile.

In sponsorship news, England have signed a deal with Trebor Extra Strong Mints.

Bobby Barrett and his brother Lee get a full page feature as the lucky winners of a competition to travel to Turin to meet Ian Rush, and then see him in action for Juventus against Pisa.

In foreign news, Jean-Marie Pfaff is in dispute with Bayern Munich after they blocked him moving to Manchester United.

Another player in contract dispute, but possibly leaving rather than joining Manchester United is Norman Whiteside. Bryan Robson uses his column to say that such a departure would be a loss to United, amid rumours that Juventus want to sign him in a swap deal for Ian Rush.

St Mirren manager Alex Smith hits back at those who say the Scottish Cup holders are in crisis, by saying they will be back stronger than before.

With Euro 88 on the horizon, Shoot does a four page profile of Republic Of Ireland, with David Kelly warning John Aldridge and Niall Quinn that he is planning to keep them out of the side after a hat-trick on his debut against Israel.

Trevor Francis tells Shoot that he is not finished, at the age of 34, have left one Rangers (the Glasgow one) for another (the West London one) due a lack of games.

Despite being in the Second Division, Manchester City manager Mel Machin predicts his side will become the Liverpool of the 1990s. City’s main star is Paul Stewart, who says he gets embarrassed at being described as a million pound player.

A player worth a quarter of that is Leroy Rosenior, newly signed by West Ham, and off to a goalscoring start, gives an interview to Shoot.

Also off to a goalscoring start is Brian McClair at Manchester United, set to be the first United player in 20 years to score 20 league goals, but tells Shoot that he doesn’t consider himself to be a goalscorer.

The magazine ends with a full page on PFA Award winners John Barnes and Paul Gascoigne.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MANCHESTER UNITED – NOVEMBER 1997

Peter Schmeichel is the cover star of this edition of Manchester United’s official magazine as the Winter months of 1997 approach.

In news, former United star Andrei Kanchelskis says he regrets leaving United and how he loved living in Manchester. In 2001, he would join City on loan.

Cover star Schmeichel gives a five page interview where he complains about the atmosphere at Old Trafford.

There is a look back at United’s recent European Cup game away to Kosice, looking at how football in Slovakia is coping in the years following a split from Czechoslovakia.

With the internet still in it’s infancy, there is a double page spread on the best football sites on the net.

Ronny Johnsen gets a three page interview, hoping for a Norway v England meeting at the following year’s World Cup, simply for the number of United players involved.

In adverts, Gary and Phil Neville appear in an advert for American sportswear firm Pony.

Brian McClair has his diary in a month where he gets a three page profile due to his autobiography being out, revealing that he wanted to be a punk as a teenager.

As usual, the magazine ends with a review of recent games, and a preview of upcoming games.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT 1.2.1986

Craig Johnston of Liverpool is the cover star ahead of a big week of cup football, but it will be revealed inside that he could be ending his season at the World Cup in Mexico.

Terry Gibson gets a double page interview after having an eventful year where his house and car suffered a series of attacks from a female fan who wanted to try and stop him from leaving Coventry.

Trevor Brooking tries to predict the outcome of the 4th Round of the FA Cup, tipping wins for Liverpool, Manchester United and Everton.

In Scotland, Shoot predicts a cup exit for Rangers in the tie of the round away to Hearts.

Shoot does a feature on Hung Quec Dang, who won Bobby Charlton Soccer Schools Competition to be invited to train with Manchester United, Tottenham Hotspur, Juventus and Aston Villa.

As the World Cup nears, Shoot does a “Focus On …..” with Bobby Robson, where he reveals that his favourite singers are Frank Sinatra, Neil Diamond and Shirley Bassey.

As you turn the page, there is another Robson, this time Bryan, who suggests that Craig Johnston, an Australian eligible for England, should be in England’s World Cup squad, while adding that Scotland and Northern Ireland might also be interested in getting his services, as he was eligible for all three countries due to having a UK passport.

There is a third Robson, Stewart, who got mentioned in Bryan’s column, suggesting he might be a star for Bobby at Euro 88.

Staying with the World Cup preparations, Scotland manager Alex Ferguson hits back at suggestions that his role with the national side is having a negative impact on Aberdeen, as he tries to do two jobs at once.

West Ham are getting cheered on from Yorkshire, as Mervyn Day tells Shoot he is pleased to see West Ham’s upturn in results this season.

Anthony Smith of Anglesey wins Jimmy Greaves Letter Of The Week for suggesting Don Revie should return to Leeds as manager, while Padraic Moran of Kilkenny suggests Liverpool should drop Ian Rush.

Gerry Forrest gets a full page feature, as he comes to terms with making his top flight debut at the age of 29, after making a move from Rotheram United to Southampton.

In transfer rumours, Everton want to sign Nick Pickering, Luton want to sign Brian McClair, and Sammy McIlroy wants to leave Manchester City in order to get games for the forthcoming World Cup.

Ian Rush uses his column to hit back at Brian Clough, after the Nottingham Forest manager accused Liverpool of being moaners after a recent draw between the two teams.

Motherwell get a Club Profile, while Aston Villa manager Graham Turner defends his record in the transfer market, having spent relatively big money on Paul Elliott, Simon Stainrod, Steve Hodge and Andy Gray.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.6.1986

Action from the opening game of Mexico 86 between Bulgaria and Italy is on the cover of Shoot, as they bring you the latest news from the ongoing World Cup.

England are hoping to win it for the first time since 1966, and their winning captain that day, Bobby Moore, is now a columnist for Shoot, and he lists the players that have impressed him in the opening games, such as Socrates, Maradona, Platini, Papin, Boniek, as well as Randy Regan and Bruce Wilson of Canada.

Bryan Robson is hoping to emulate his fellow Shoot columnist by lifting the trophy, but it hasn’t got off to the best of starts, as he writes of his frustration of England failing to win their first two games, but predicts England will reach the knock out stages. Beside his column is an advert for New Balance, which he endorses.

There is a double page interview with Jim Leighton, where he reveals that he didn’t want to be a goalkeeper.

News from Mexico includes that Fenerbache made approached Franz Beckenbauer to quit West Germany and become manager of Fenerbache, while in Italy, there is a potential match fixing scandal about to blow open.

Italy’s group opponents Bulgaria haven’t made many friends, by holding training behind closed doors and having armed guards outside their training facilities.

Shoot’s man in Mexico, Bill Day brands England’s performances “A disgrace”, while being complimentary about Northern Ireland, despite losing 2-1 to Spain.

Ray Daly from County Offaly writes to Jimmy Greaves to suggest that when Ron Atkinson’s inevitable departure as Manchester United manager is confirmed, the job should go to United legend Lou Macari.

There is a round-up of results from the 1985-1986 Scottish League seasons, with Steve Cowan of Hibs being top scorer, 2 ahead of Brian McClair. Both men would go on to win league titles outside their native country, Cowan with Portadown and McClair with Manchester United.

Outside of the World Cup, Republic Of Ireland are making progress under Jack Charlton, already lifting a trophy by winning a triangular tournament in Iceland against the hosts and Czechoslovakia.

Steve Hodge gets a full page profile having broken into the England squad in time to head to Mexico. A potential Aston Villa team-mate of Hodge’s is John Hewitt, in a contract dispute with Aberdeen, which gets a full page feature. Discussions are on hold at the moment, due to Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson being in Mexico in his role as Scotland manager.

Nigel Winterburn of Wimbledon, looking forward to playing in the top flight for the first time, gets a full page interview, where he credits his former manager at Birmingham, Jim Smith, with saving his career.

There is also a full page profile of League of Ireland champions Shamrock Rovers.

In club news, Alex Ferguson spoke of his dislike for agents after Eric Black moved to Metz, while Liam Brady was leaving unsubtle hints for Arsenal to buy him back.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 28.12.1985

Nothing says Christmas quite like Charlie Nicholas holding a crown, and that’s what Shoot readers were treated to as they tucked into their turkey in 1985.

As you open the magazine, Ian Rush writes that he hopes 1986 will be a better year for him than 1985, and saying that Wales players failed Mike England in 1985, while also criticising the FAW for playing their vital World Cup qualifier against Scotland at Cardiff rather than Wrexham.

Shoot columnist Jimmy Greaves gets a double page interview, but it’s not football he’s discussing, it’s his predictions for other sports in 1986.

Cover star Charlie Nicholas writes that he is lacking in Christmas Spirit for the fixture computer as Arsenal face Liverpool and Manchester United over the festive period, with Nicholas pointing out that he has been on the losing side in his five games against United for Arsenal.

Nicholas is also pictured visiting Selfridges.

Another top flight player is pictured dressed as Santa. The clues are that he is 25, plays for a club in the North of England and has less than ten international caps. It is revealed later in the magazine that it is Gary Lineker.

In world news, Brazilian star Eder is linked with a move to Spurs, Gerard Houllier is praised for PSGs unbeaten start in France, and Holland have been offered lucrative friendlies in the summer of 1986 which will earn them more money than if they had reached Mexico.

In Uruguay, legendary manager Luis Cubilla has been jailed for attacking a referee who gave a penalty against his team.

Brian Clough is the subject of a “Focus On ….” feature, where he reveals his favourite musician is Frank Sinatra.

Shoot does a double page feature on transfers that almost happened, such as Jim Bett to Southampton, Bryan Robson to Everton and Charlie Nicholas to Manchester United.

Nicholas decided against signing for Untied after meeting Ron Atkinson, who he says talks about himself too much.

There is a double page spread featuring all the results in the qualifiers for the 1986 World Cup.

Shoot does a full page profile of Oxford United manager Maurice Evans, who has been given Robert Maxwell’s seal of approval after being predicted to be the first manager sacked at the start of the season.

Led by European Cup winner Peter Withe, Sheffield United get a feature and a team poster as they aim for promotion to the top flight.

Glenn Hoddle has been making the most of his spare time by spending it in the recording studio, where Shoot joined him, stating that he is determined to become good at Guitar. He would have a Top 20 hit in 1987 as part of Glenn and Chris, alongside Chris Waddle.

Peter Shilton gets a full page profile, with quotes of what other football personalities say about him. Bobby Robson describes him as the greatest goalkeeper of all time.

Alex Ferguson of Scotland and Aberdeen gets a double page profile looking at what makes him tick. He had recently turned down a move to Inter Milan.

John Bailey gets a profile, having left Everton for Newcastle. Bailey was seen as a joker at Goodison where he arranged for a Kissogram for manager Howard Kendall.

Bryan Robson’s column discusses United’s signing of John Sivebeak, having got glowing reports from Frank Stapleton and Kevin Moran, who faced him in a recent international.

Also writing about a new signing is Paul McStay, who is delighted that Mark McGee has signed for Celtic.

Manchester United’s explosive start to the season brought back memories of Leeds going 29 games unbeaten at the start of 1973-1974, and Leeds stars of that era share their memories.

Alan McDonald is interviewed, where he reveals that he turned down Manchester United, Liverpool and Everton to join QPR, hits back at England fans who suggested that their draw with Northern Ireland was a fix, and reveals that he feels he is far from guaranteed a place in Northern Ireland’s World Cup squad.

West Ham’s forward duo of Tony Cottee and Frank McAvennie are profiled, where it is revealed that their partnership only came together due to injury.

Scotland fans got a double page photo collage from their side’s World Cup Play-Off win against Australia, with Graeme Souness being interviewed over the page, stating that it was Scotland’s best chance to get past the group stages for the first time.

Ian Greaves gets interviewed, having recently turned down the chance to manage West Brom in order to stay at Mansfield.

Chelsea and Manchester United are keeping an eye on Brian McClair, who has just handed in a transfer request at Celtic after being dropped to make way for Mark McGhee, while Colin Gibson hopes his recent move to Manchester United will get him a place in England’s World Cup squad.

Seamus McDonagh was £900 out of pocket when he played for Republic of Ireland in a recent match against Denmark, after flying in from America (where he plays his club football) at his own expense, and his match fee not covering it.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve McMahon. His favourite singers are Rod Stewart and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.5.1990

Not long to go now until kick-off at Wembley. Back in 1990, Manchester United and Crystal Palace drew 3-3, meaning a replay was required to decide who won the cup.

That won’t happen today, as it has to be played to a finish

Printing deadlines meant Shoot could only cover the original game in this edition.

That match at Wembley got four pages of coverage, with a lot going to wether Ian Wright, who came off the bench to score twice, would be picked in the replay.

In Scotland, they didn’t go to a replay, as they used a penalty shoot-out to decide it. Aberdeen beat Celtic 9-8 in the first Scottish Cup Final decided by penalties, but Aberdeen manager Alex Smith criticising the use of a penalty shoot-out instead of a replay, even though his team won.

Luton Town’s great escape against relegation gets covered with an interview with Kingsley Black, who announces he wants to stay at Luton despite interest from Nottingham Forest and Liverpool.

Shoot previews the European Cup Final, which Ruud Gullit is desperate to play in after a season blighted by injuries.

He did play in a match which finished 1-0 to AC Milan, just as predicted by Shoot.

With the World Cup coming up, Scotland face Poland in a friendly, with Shoot interviewing Stuart McCall, as he reflected on the moment he almost made a substitute appearance for England in an Under 21 international.

Leeds United are promoted back to the top flight of English football after an eight year absence, but Shoot says they should be kicked out of football altogether after crowd trouble at their final game at Bournemouth.

Ian Rush uses his column to pay tribute to Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish, who has just retired as a player, making a final appearance in the game against Derby.

There is a double page interview with Niall Quinn, who recently left Arsenal for Manchester City in a bid to get first-team football to ensure his place in the Republic of Ireland’s World Cup squad.

In foreign news, Diego Maradona intends to stay at Napoli in an attempt to win the European Cup.

In ads, there was an advert for Esso’s World Cup coins of the England and Scotland teams.

Transfer rumours see Sampdoria want to sign Steve McMahon, Celtic want to sign Brian McClair, and Liverpool want to sign Wynton Rufer.

Previews of the forthcoming World Cup continue with United Arab Emirates, a squad who is very much disunited due to rows over money.

Dundee’s relegation from Scotland’s top flight was covered with an interview with Billy Dodds, who says he intends to stay at Dens Park.

There is another Wembley Cup Final this week, with Third Division champions Bristol Rovers taking on Tranmere Rovers in the Leyland Daf Cup Final.

Rovers were currently exiled at Twerton Park in Bath, with defender Geoff Twentyman saying the club will be the poor relations in the city until they get a new ground.

Tranmere won the match 2-1.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.5.1990

Today at Wembley, an expensively assembled and underachieving Manchester United side with a manager under pressure and living in the shadow of a retired Scottish legend arrive at Wembley to take on Crystal Palace in the FA Cup Final, hoping that winning the FA Cup will be the springboard to an era of success.

If that sounds familiar, it’s because we’ve been here before, in 1990.

As supporters sat in front of their TVs with only four channels, unless you had one of those new on the market satellie dishes, it’s possible they may have been reading Shoot’s preview, which had a split cover of Brian McClair and Ian Wright as Manchester United face Crystal Palace.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has full page profiles on central defenders set to be involved, with Andy Thorn of Palace prepared to play through the pain barrier, and Gary Pallister of United aiming to prove he won’t be a flop at United, after a British Record transfer from Middlesbrough.

In news, Celtic manager Billy McNeill is planning a clear out in the summer, while Manchester United are planning to sign Denis Irwin from Oldham Athletic, who Shoot have erroneously described as a Dubliner.

Bray Wanderers will be facing St Francis in the FAI Cup Final at Lansdowne Road, the game moved from Dalymount Park after the FAI anticipated Derry City to win their Semi-Final against Bray.

Midfielders aren’t ignored in the game at Wembley, with Shoot doing a profile of Bryan Robson and Andy Gray.

Celtic are facing Aberdeen in the Scottish Cup Final, and Shoot does a full page profile on Jacki Dzieckanowski, where he reveals his favourite band is Dire Straits.

Aberdeen are represented with a full page profile of Brian Irvine, who talks about his Christianity.

After scoring winning goals in the 3rd Round and Semi-Final, Mark Robins gets profiled.

In world news, Bayern Munich became the first German club to be floated on the Stock Exchange.

Austria are this week’s preview ahead of the World Cup in Italy, mostly focusing on Toni Polster.

Curiously, Shoot does a double page interview with Mark Bright and Ian Wright as they go out for a cycle.

Liam Brady gets profiled ahead of Republic Of Ireland’s friendly against Finland, but his appearance will only be symbolic, as it is a farewell in his own testimonial, having retired from international football the previous September.

It won’t stop him going to Italy, as he’ll be going to the World Cup as a pundit for RTE.

David Rocastle talks to Shoot about his frustration at injuries leading to his loss of form. The article is accompanied by a competition where you can win The Rocky Road To Success, a VHS tape profiling David Rocastle.

Liverpool’s recent title success gets profiled, with Alan Hansen claiming the club can dominate English football for the next twenty years.

The magazine ends with a double page profile of Scotland ahead of the World Cup in Italy.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 22.12.1984

It’s Christmas 1984, and Match gets in the festive mood, with a cartoon of Bryan Robson as Santa, and Kerry Dixon, Glenn Hoddle, Ian Rush and Mark Hateley as choirboys with their uniforms in their respective club kits, while Mo Johnston is a schoolboy meeting Santa.

A double page feature asks a series of stars what their ideal Christmas would be. John O’Neill of Leicester City’s ideal Christmas is Midnight Mass, take delivery of BMW 635, take Felicity Kendall out for a spin, then head to Switzerland for a holiday. Steve McMahon also wanted to be on holiday in Switzerland.

John Barnes would like a holiday to Jamaica for Christmas, while Kevin Ratcliffe wants a Snooker table.

One person who has want they want for Christmas is Trevor Francis. Based in Italy with Sampdoria, he was planning to take advantage of Italy’s mid season break to go back to England over the holiday period, and wanting to watch a Division One game on Boxing Day.

Peter Brackley, commentator with ITV’s ‘The Big Match’ is interviewed where he reveals he supports Brighton, and that former Albion player Mark Lawrenson is “The most complete player in the country”

He also won a talent competition at Butlins when he was younger for doing impersonations.

Match gives a double page spread to a recent FA Cup 2nd Round tie between Bristol City and Bristol Rovers, which Rovers won 3-1, in front of a crowd of 20,000 – more than double any FA Cup crowd that day.

In the middle of the magazine, you could get a centre page poster of Gordon Strachan.

Clive Allen gets a Q and A. Kenny Dalglish is his favourite Football League player, while Michel Platini is his favourite foriegn player, and includes David O’Leary and Mark Lawrenson in his British XI. He also dislikes smoking and bad drivers.

Ever wondered who Clive Allen’s favourite pop star is? Christopher Cross.

In League tables, Everton, Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester United and Arsenal were seperated at the top of Division One by two points. Liverpool were 8th, 9 points off the top.

Brian McClair of Celtic got a poster, his reward for being Nike’s man of the month. Interestingly, 1984-1985 was the first season and English club wore Nike. Sunderland, since you ask.

The foreign news feature reports that Giorgio Chinaglia is planning a comeback at the age of 38, while Steve Archibald is in goalscoring for for Barcelona, and Fortuna Dusseldorf have asked their players to take a wage cut.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.4.1993

Ian Wright and Mark Bright, former team-mates at Crystal Palace, now playing for Arsenal and Sheffield Wednesday, are the cover stars as Shoot looks forward to the League Cup Final between the two clubs.

In news, each member of the Scotland squad received a bottle of champagne from Berti Vogts, but Brian McClair was unable to collect his, so Pat Nevin claimed on his behalf. McClair was still waiting to receive his.

It was announced that week that Aston Villa were to face Everton in a friendly in Mauritius at the end of May 1993.

Meanwhile, if you wanted a bizarre piece of Arsenal memorabilia was on sale, with the infamous mural behind the goal while a stand was being built at Highbury going for sale.

Shoot does a double page report on reserve team football, taking a look at the game between QPR and Wimbledon, looking at the type of player (young, out of favour, returning from injury, etc) who are involved in these games, and how they use it in their careers.

Rangers, potentially one game away from the European Cup Final, get a full page preview of their game against CSKA Moscow, with Richard Gough being interviewed about their ability to come from behind in European games.

The set-up of the European Cup needs explained to give context, much different from today’s competition.

It was a straight knock-out until the Last 8, when, instead of Quarter-Finals, two groups of two, with the group winners meeting in the final.

After five games, Rangers were level on points with Marseille, but the French side had a vastly superior Goal Difference.

Rangers needed to get a better result than Marseille. Marseille won, making Rangers 0-0 draw at home to CSKA Moscow irrelevant.

Kris Lee writes to Jimmy Greaves to say that Arsenal should give David O’Leary a coaching role while Joao Miguel Marabuto Neves from Portugal writes in about Rangers, saying that despite beating Leeds in the European Cup, Manchester United and Aston Villa, challenging for the Premier League, wouldn’t fear playing them.

Peter Fox of Stoke City, aged 35, gets profiled, enjoying a return to Stoke City’s team as they try to gain promotion from the Third Tier. Earlier that season, Fox had spent time on loan at Linfield.

There is a 12 page pull-out previewing the League Cup Final between Sheffield Wednesday and Arsenal, with guest pundit Steve Bruce predicting a win for Wednesday. Arsenal won the game 2-1, a match best remembered for Steven Morrow falling over when being given a piggyback by Tony Adams. Morrow wasn’t even mentioned in the preview.

Shoot gives a double page spread on crowd safety, this poll coming just four years after Hillsbrough.

26% of people disagreed with all seater stadiums
21% of people had stopped standing since Hillsbrough
94% of people felt safer supporting their team
51% of people felt safer attending football matches than before Hillsbrough

Ryan Giggs, having just scored his first international goal, against Belgium, gets a full-page poster to commemorate this.

There is a competition to win a complete Panini Serie A stickerbook, and a Lotto football.

In Scottish football news, Raith Rovers manager Jimmy Nicholl is attracting interest from teams looking to replace long serving managers ….. Dundee United and Northern Ireland.

He has yet to manage either.