MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 20.5.1978

Frank Worthington is one of the cover stars, as Shoot looks forward to the British Championship, while looking back at he 1977-1978 season.

Shoot did a double page spread previewing all six games in the British Championship, accompanied by facts and figures of all the teams.

England, who didn’t qualify for that year’s World Cup, took the title, winning all three of their games.

In adverts, there was a full page advert for the following week’s edition, which had a free World Cup wallchart.

Ray Clemence uses his column to state that England are desperate to beat Wales, having suffered their first ever Wembley defeat to them in 1977.

England beat Wales 3-1 at Ninian Park in their opening game of the competition.

In news, a thousand fans signed a petition to the IFA for the lifetime bans from international football imposed on Bobby Campbell and Bertie McMinn, for an off-field incident at an underage tournament in 1975.

Bobby Campbell was a non appearing squad member at the 1982 World Cup, so obviously, the petition was successful.

17 year old Craig Johnston has broke into the Middlesbrough team, after borrowing £632 from his dad in order to get to England.

Coventry City are in danger of being known as “The Curly Kids”, with seven players all having perms.

Elton John got a full page feature. Yes, the nephew of 1959 FA Cup Final goalscorer Roy Dwight. In 1979, he was the chairman of Watford, just promoted from Division 4. As ever, he wanted a Number 1 – Watford to be in Division 1.

He was full of praise for the management team of Graham Taylor and Bertie Mee, and stated he was nervous watching games, even more than when he is on stage.

Elton had big plans for Watford, wanting to build a 30-40,000 capacity stadium, and a pitch with synthetic turf.

Elton was looking to other clubs for inspiration “I would like us to achieve the professionalism of Liverpool, the facilities of Aston Villa, and the organisation of Coventry”

There is a further double page spread on the Home Internationals, with a player from each side giving their thoughts ahead of the games.

Andy Gray uses his column to express his disappointment at only being a stand-by player for the World Cup, but he was hoping to make up for it by helping Scotland to a third successive Home Nations title.

Shoot does a double page spread on Birmingham’s two clubs, with new City manager Jim Smith hoping to wake up what he describes as “A sleeping giant”, while Ron Saunders blames injuries for Aston Villa’s failure to build on their 4th place finish and League Cup win in 1977.

There is a poster of John Greig’s Testimonial, where Rangers beat a Scotland XI 5-0.

Trevor Francis poses in an NFL uniform, as he is about to head off on a short-term loan to Detroit Express during the pre-season.

Little did he know it then, Francis would make English football history less than a year later with his next move.

In world news, Sepp Maier has signed an Amnesty International petition for the release of political prisoners in Argentina. Talking of Argentina, Alberto Tarantini is being paid by his country’s FA as he is without a club. That year, he signed for Birmingham City. Spain defender Jose Camacho was ruled out of the World cup through injury, while priests in West Germany have been sent a schedule of World Cup games, in order to avoid clashing services with matches.

Daniel Passarella gets a double page interview ahead of the World Cup. When asked about Peru, he said he wasn’t impressed with them. That didn’t come back to bite them, as Argentina beat Peru 6-0 in the 2nd Round group stage.

In adverts, you could get four World Cup posters (of the four groups) in Wimpy. All you had to do was buy a burger and milkshake.

Martin Peters gets a profile, where he states his favourite band is Bread, and he would most like to meet Miss Piggy.

Shoot dedicates a page to a new trend in football – perms, with a photo collage of footballers who have perms. Meanwhile, John Greig says fans have been telling that Rangers should replace Scotland in the World Cup, after they beat a Scotland XI 5-0 in his Testimonial.

Gordon Hill uses his column to state that, following his departure from Manchester United, if he didn’t rejoin his former United boss Tommy Docherty at Derby County, he would have gone to America to play.

To finish, getting people in the mood for the World Cup, is a double page spread on the club form of Scotland’s squad, as the tournament in Argentina approaches.

Advertisements

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.12.1983

Jesper Olsen, in an Ajax kit doing keep-uppeys, is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Despite wearing an Ajax kit, he’s very much a Manchester United player, having just signed for the club.

The headline desribes him as “United’s new George Best” – No pressure there.

United’s purchase of Olsen, in the week that Notts County couldn’t afford to sign Glenn Roeder is used as evidence in an editorial that a breakaway Super League of England’s top club beckons.

Olsen helped Denmark reach Euro 84 at the expense of England. 1966 World Cup winner Alan Ball speaks to Shoot about what England can do to win the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, suggesting that England should start throwing young players into international games.

Olsen wouldn’t be wearing a United shirt until the summer of 1984, as he’d be seeing out the season at Ajax, with Bryan Robson using his column to compare him to George Best, and urging United fans to keep a close eye on him when Denmark are playing in the European Championship in France.

England might not be heading to the finals in France, but Wales have a chance, and their qualifier against Yugoslavia is previewed. A win for Wales would send them to France.

The match finished 1-1, which meant they had to hope Yugoslavia fail to beat Bulgaria, but the Yugoslavs won it with an injury time winner.

If Wales were dreaming of France, Scotland weren’t, with a dismal campaign which saw them finish bottom of a group containing Belgium, East Germany and Switzerland.

Scotland were now looking to the 1986 World Cup Qualifiers, and that began with a British Championship game at Windsor Park against Northern Ireland, a side who Jock Stein has failed to beat as Scotland manager.

In competitions, Shoot were giving away a trip to the European Championship in France. The Subbutteo European Championship that is.

In club football, Dennis Mortimer speaks to Shoot about his return to the Aston Villa team, and how it has given him a new lease of life.

Paul Mariner is interviewed by Shoot, telling them that he fears he is played his last England game, having just turned 30, and how he revels on the verbal abuse he receives from oppositions fans.

It’s not just the 1986 World Cup that people are looking forward to, as England have submitted a bid to host the 1990 World Cup. They fear they have been upstage by Italy, who sent a delegation to FIFA HQ, while Greece sent a Telex, and Soviet Union hand delivered theirs.

Paolo Rossi has been fined £1,400 by authorities in Italy for the crime of wearing the national shirt without permission, after wearing it in an advert for sunglasses.

Another star with money problems was Diego Maradona, who had to pay £4,000 on excess baggage on a flight back home to Buenos Aires.

Raymond Goethels, manager of Standard Liege, predicts that Dundee United will win the European Cup in 1984.

Staying with Scottish teams, Rangers defender John McClelland is a guest columnist, and he declares that Mark McGhee is his toughest opponent.

Gary Mabbutt is another guest columnist, and he praises his young Tottenham team-mate Ally Dick.

Kenny Dalglish’s column focuses on Scotland’s visit to Windsor Park, saddened that this is the last season of the British Championship.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 28.5.1983

It’s Cup Final Day in England and Scotland, but it’s the English game that is on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot, as Brighton take on Manchester United at Wembley.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread with Bryan Robson, Jimmy Case and Michael Robinson giving their thoughts on the game, with Robson wanting to win the cup for Remi Moses, who was suspended for he game, alongside Steve Foster of Brighton.

There is also a double page interview with the two managers, Ron Atkinson and Jimmy Melia, both Scousers.

There is a feature on the two referees in London and Glasgow, with David Syme achieving a rare double, referee the Scottish Cup Final 16 years after his dad did.

In ads, you could buy a Paolo Rossi branded boot, made by Pony.

In posters, the centre page spread is a poster collage of Manchester United and Brighton players.

Gary Shaw previews the European Cup Final between Juventus (who eliminated holders Aston Villa) and Hamburg, with Shaw predicting a win for Juventus, and addressing rumours of a move for him and Gordon Cowans to Italy, stating he is well suited to continental football.

Shaw also previews the FA Cup Final, stating he wants United to win, only because it would secure a UEFA Cup place for Aston Villa.

Staying in the West Midlands, West Brom’s Dutch duo of Romeo Zondervan and Martin Jol being annoyed about their exile from the national team, and declaring that the standard of football in England is better than in Holland. Jol speaks about Holland’s best young players, including Frank Rijkaard, stating “He would only last one game in England, he twists and turns too much and holds the ball too long”

1983 was the year Everton won the league …….. for Liverpool, with a 2-0 win over Manchester United at Goodison Park which ended United’s title challenge, with Everton defender Mark Higgins believing the club are on the verge of making a serious challenge in future years to send the title to the blue half, rather than the red half of Merseyside.

Another Blue (of the Manchester variety) hoping for a big future was Alex Williams, who had a breakthrough season at Manchester City, and was setting his sights on being England’s goalkeeper.

It wasn’t a World Cup year, but there was news about the competition this week, with the official film of the 1982 tournament being broadcast on TV after cinemas in the country deemed it too expensive to show., while Toluca was rejected as a host city for Mexico 86 sue to security fears.

From the World Cup to the British Championship, Northern Ireland head to Hampden Park looking to get their first win in 7 visits. A more prouder record, is Sammy McIlroy, who has played in Northern Ireland’s last 22 games and is looking to continue that run.

There was also coverage of the Scottish Cup Final, with a poster of Aberdeen and Rangers, and interviews with John McClelland, Peter McCloy and Jim Leighton.