MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.8.1989

It’s the kick-off of the 1989-1990 season, and Shoot’s famous League Ladders poster, which came free with this edition, is the cover image.

The magazine opens with Bryan Robson’s column, where is confident that Manchester United can win the title, and believes his side are ready to show their credentials against reigning champions Arsenal on the opening day of the season.

He also touches on the World Cup in Italy, coming up at the end of the season, predicting that it will be won by a European team and that England aren’t far off.

Shoot itself gets a feature. The reason for the trumpet blowing? Shoot had just celebrated it’s 20th anniversary.

Real Madrid have signed a young player, but in tragic circumstances, symbolically signing one year old Sergio Cunningham, after the death of his dad, former Real Madrid player Lawrie Cunningham.

Terry Butcher showed off his drumming skills in Stirling recently for the band Tonto. Shoot describes Butcher as a self confessed head banger who lists Iron Maiden as his favourite band.

Theo Snelders tells Shoot of his determination to get back into the Holland squad after being controversially dropped after the manager said he was too scared to play against Germany.

John Fashanu has just joined Shoot and uses his debut column to put an end to rumours that he wants to leave Wimbledon.

In posters, you can get one of new Everton signing Norman Whiteside, while Gazza advertises Brooks boots.

Graham Roberts uses his column to reveal the reason why he left Rangers to join Chelsea – a dressing room falling out with manager Graeme Souness.

In news, The Football League is negotiating for the use of Wembley Stadium for the Play-Off Finals.

John Robertson tells Shoot that he is glad to have rejoined Hearts from Newcastle United, believing it will be a boost to his chances of going to the World Cup if Scotland qualify.

Shoot isn’t the only one celebrating a milestone birthday, Match of the Day turns 25 and gets a full page feature.

Jimmy Greaves predicts how he things the league table will look in 1990, predicting Liverpool to take the title back from Arsenal, with Charlton, Luton and Southampton getting relegated.

Jan Molby gets a full page interview, telling Shoot he is desperate to become a regular starter for Liverpool again, and win back his place in Denmark’s squad.

Kevin Gallacher gets a double page profile, where he reveals Deacon Blue are one of his favourite bands, and met Ricky Ross at a concert for Paul Sturrock’s testimonial, and that Ross was more nervoud of meeting Dundee united players than they were of meeting him.

There is a full page feature on Gerry Francis, who is remaining loyal to Bristol Rovers despite financial troubles at the club, but warns they won’t have any success in the future unless they get a new stadium, with the club playing at Twerton Park in Bath.

Ray Wilkins has just rejoined Rangers, and has hit back at suggestions that English players who join the Ibrox club (Wilkins was the 13th to do so under Graeme Souness) are jeopardising their international career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JANUARY 1986

Bryan Robson is the cover star of the first World Soccer of 1986, a year he hopes will bring him glory for club and country, neither of which have celebrated glory since the 1960s.

The draw for the 1986 World Cup has taken place, the first World Cup where final group games are played simultaneously, amid complaints of travelling between stadiums.

This draw gets plenty of coverage. The group stages sees Italy and Argentina paired together, the 4th successive World Cup they would meet each other.

There is a feature on Canada captain Bruce Wilson, who finds himself without a club six months before the tournament, while Morocco get a profile.

There is a double page report on Juventus, who have just won the World Club after beating Argentinos Juniors on penalties.

There is a feature on European Cup Quarter-Finalists Steau Bucharest.

In Austria, Bruno Pezzey has been appointed captain of the national side, as they aim to qualify for Euro 88.

In England, it looked like Manchester United were going to run away with the title, but have been pulled back by Liverpool after a series of bad results.

Malcolm Allison has the World Cup on his mind, but the 1990 one, having been appointed manager of Kuwait.

In Turkey, there is unrest at Fenerbache, with players protesting at bonuses that were promised to the squad not being paid.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 31.7.1982

The cover image is of Dino Zoff lifting aloft the World Cup trophy, as Shoot reviews the 1982 World Cup, won by Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a single page report of the final, with a statistical analysis of the tournament beside it.

There is then a double page profile of the three UK teams at the tournament – England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Shoot then does a more indepth report on the tournament, saying that overall it wasn’t good, but the performances of teams such as Algeria, Cameroon and Honduras meant that expanding it to 24 teams was a success.

Bryan Robson writes in his column that Brazil were the team of the tournament, England would have won it if they had Zico, and that the biggest disappointment was Diego Maradona.

Ron Greenwood is interviewed, saying it had been a great five years as England manager, and that he won’t use his role as an Advisor with the FA to interfere with new manager Bobby Robson.

Phil Thompson uses his column to state he was proud of England’s performances, and that if England weren’t to win it, he would have loved Brazil to do so.

Danny McGrain uses his column to express his pride at Scotland winning the youth version of the European Championship, as well as the emergence of players such as Ally McCoist, David Moyes, Neale Cooper and Scott McGarvey.

Malcolm Allison believes that he should have been appointed England manager, and told Shoot that. Shoot also profiled his current club, Portugese champions Sporting Lisbon.

Ray Wilkins provides a full page World Cup diary for Shoot. He had a shopping trip to Madrid ruined by the weather.

Shoot does a story on Kenny Dalglish, whose international career looks over at the age of 31 after being dropped during the World Cup by Jock Stein.

It wasn’t all about the World Cup. In domestic football, Eddie Gray has been appointed manager of Leeds United, which he describes as a mammoth task.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.4.1988

Terry Butcher is the cover star of Shoot as he makes a timely return from injury, with Euro 88 just around the corner.

As you open the magazine, Adrian Heath tells Shoot of his dismay at being singled out as a scapegoat by Everton fans when things don’t go well.

Cover star Butcher uses his column to declare he was back from injury, and that if he came through Rangers match against Hibs unscathed, he will be aiming for an England recall for the friendly in Hungary.

Butcher also defends his manager at Rangers, Graeme Souness, who has faced press criticism for a tackle he made in a European Cup tie against Steau Bucharest.

The Football League celebrates it’s centenary with a 16 team tournament at Wembley decided by the highest scorers in each four divisions. This competitions gets a four page profile.

In sponsorship news, England have signed a deal with Trebor Extra Strong Mints.

Bobby Barrett and his brother Lee get a full page feature as the lucky winners of a competition to travel to Turin to meet Ian Rush, and then see him in action for Juventus against Pisa.

In foreign news, Jean-Marie Pfaff is in dispute with Bayern Munich after they blocked him moving to Manchester United.

Another player in contract dispute, but possibly leaving rather than joining Manchester United is Norman Whiteside. Bryan Robson uses his column to say that such a departure would be a loss to United, amid rumours that Juventus want to sign him in a swap deal for Ian Rush.

St Mirren manager Alex Smith hits back at those who say the Scottish Cup holders are in crisis, by saying they will be back stronger than before.

With Euro 88 on the horizon, Shoot does a four page profile of Republic Of Ireland, with David Kelly warning John Aldridge and Niall Quinn that he is planning to keep them out of the side after a hat-trick on his debut against Israel.

Trevor Francis tells Shoot that he is not finished, at the age of 34, have left one Rangers (the Glasgow one) for another (the West London one) due a lack of games.

Despite being in the Second Division, Manchester City manager Mel Machin predicts his side will become the Liverpool of the 1990s. City’s main star is Paul Stewart, who says he gets embarrassed at being described as a million pound player.

A player worth a quarter of that is Leroy Rosenior, newly signed by West Ham, and off to a goalscoring start, gives an interview to Shoot.

Also off to a goalscoring start is Brian McClair at Manchester United, set to be the first United player in 20 years to score 20 league goals, but tells Shoot that he doesn’t consider himself to be a goalscorer.

The magazine ends with a full page on PFA Award winners John Barnes and Paul Gascoigne.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.3.1986

Sheffield Wednesday’s on form striker Garry Thompson is the cover star, in a week where Shoot speculates that Manchester United might be trying to sign Sammy Lee from Liverpool.

Lee is the subject of a double page feature, where he states he is aiming to make up for lost time after a disappointing 84-85 due to injuries and loss of form.

Lee was linked with Manchester United by Shoot, whose Danish defender John Sivebaek has revealed he joined United for money, while manager Ron Atkinson revealed that it was his goal against Republic Of Ireland in a World Cup Qualifier which prompted United to sign him, beating off competition from Spurs, Celtic, Atletico Madrid and Club Brugge.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot looks at the chances of those wanting to go. They did a report on Terry Fenwick’s performance during QPR’s 1-1 draw with Luton, concluding that he is being wasted in midfield.

One player not going to Mexico was Remi Moses, who would be missing out through injury. Bryan Robson writes about this in his column, and also states that Mark Hughes wants to stay at Manchester United, and then promotes his fan club, which you can join for £3.50 a year if you live in the British Isles.

In news, Reading’s Andy Rogers was saved by the club’s physio after he collapsed during a recent game.

Two youngsters getting full page profiles were Nigel Spackman (Chelsea) and Paul Stephenson (Newcastle United)

Shoot reports that Barcelona are looking at Mark Hughes, while Gary Williams is set to leave Aston Villa after a bust-up with manager Graham Turner.

One player agreeing with his manager was Peter Rhoades-Brown of Oxford, whos manager Maurice Evans described him as inconsistent.

Jimmy Greaves Star Letter comes from a Scotland fan complaining that it was unfair that Belgoium were considering playing their Euro 88 Qualifier against Scotland to a neutral country, due to the fear of hooliganism.

John Bond gets a double page spread, with the recently appointed Birmingham City manager stating that he can revive the club. They were relegated in 1986, and almost get relegated again in 1987, before Bond was sacked.

In foreign news, Andreas Brehme has signed a pre-contract with Bayern Munich, while Janusz Torowski and Jaroslaw Biernat have both signed for Eintracht Frankfurt, but won’t be going to the World Cup, having claimed asylum in West Germany.

Shoot is in the World Cup mood, doing a double page feature on Denmark, comparing them to the Holland side of 1974 and 1978.

Peter Davenport’s chances of going to Mexico received an endorsement from his manager at Nottingham Forest, Brian Clough, who wrote a column to urge England manager Bobby Robson to put him on the plane.

Talking of managers, Kenny Dalglish picked up his first Manager Of The Month award, but defeat to Everton ruined his day when he was presented with the award.

A future manager, was Alan Curbishley of Charlton, who was on the pitch for them in 1986, leading their promotion charge as they aimed to reach the top flight for the first time since 1957.

In Scotland, a former Rangers man has done Celtic a favour, as Mo Johnston has had a run of form kickstarted by being dropped from the Scotland squad by Alex Ferguson.

Brighton get a full page profile, as they aim to be promoted back to the top flight after being relegated in 1983.

Returning to Scotland, Shoot previewed the Scottish Cup Quarter-Finals between Hibs and Celtic, and Aberdeen v Dundee. At the time of going to print, they were the only two Quarter-Finals definitely confirmed.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT 1.2.1986

Craig Johnston of Liverpool is the cover star ahead of a big week of cup football, but it will be revealed inside that he could be ending his season at the World Cup in Mexico.

Terry Gibson gets a double page interview after having an eventful year where his house and car suffered a series of attacks from a female fan who wanted to try and stop him from leaving Coventry.

Trevor Brooking tries to predict the outcome of the 4th Round of the FA Cup, tipping wins for Liverpool, Manchester United and Everton.

In Scotland, Shoot predicts a cup exit for Rangers in the tie of the round away to Hearts.

Shoot does a feature on Hung Quec Dang, who won Bobby Charlton Soccer Schools Competition to be invited to train with Manchester United, Tottenham Hotspur, Juventus and Aston Villa.

As the World Cup nears, Shoot does a “Focus On …..” with Bobby Robson, where he reveals that his favourite singers are Frank Sinatra, Neil Diamond and Shirley Bassey.

As you turn the page, there is another Robson, this time Bryan, who suggests that Craig Johnston, an Australian eligible for England, should be in England’s World Cup squad, while adding that Scotland and Northern Ireland might also be interested in getting his services, as he was eligible for all three countries due to having a UK passport.

There is a third Robson, Stewart, who got mentioned in Bryan’s column, suggesting he might be a star for Bobby at Euro 88.

Staying with the World Cup preparations, Scotland manager Alex Ferguson hits back at suggestions that his role with the national side is having a negative impact on Aberdeen, as he tries to do two jobs at once.

West Ham are getting cheered on from Yorkshire, as Mervyn Day tells Shoot he is pleased to see West Ham’s upturn in results this season.

Anthony Smith of Anglesey wins Jimmy Greaves Letter Of The Week for suggesting Don Revie should return to Leeds as manager, while Padraic Moran of Kilkenny suggests Liverpool should drop Ian Rush.

Gerry Forrest gets a full page feature, as he comes to terms with making his top flight debut at the age of 29, after making a move from Rotheram United to Southampton.

In transfer rumours, Everton want to sign Nick Pickering, Luton want to sign Brian McClair, and Sammy McIlroy wants to leave Manchester City in order to get games for the forthcoming World Cup.

Ian Rush uses his column to hit back at Brian Clough, after the Nottingham Forest manager accused Liverpool of being moaners after a recent draw between the two teams.

Motherwell get a Club Profile, while Aston Villa manager Graham Turner defends his record in the transfer market, having spent relatively big money on Paul Elliott, Simon Stainrod, Steve Hodge and Andy Gray.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.12.1985

Paul Walsh of Liverpool is the cover star of Shoot as 1985 approaches Christmas.

In a double page interview, Walsh reveals he was conned into staying at Anfield, and has now been rewarded with an extended run in the team, and is eyeing up a place in England’s World Cup squad.

In news, Chris Turner wants to leave Manchester United due to a lack of first-team opportunities. Across Manchester, City defender Mick McCarthy has been out injured, rumoured to have been suffered in a sprint with an Irish journalist who had £20 bet he could beat him in a race, in the build-up to a recent international.

Staying in the Republic Of Ireland, their state broadcaster has signed a deal to broadcast English games at 3pm on a Saturday, much to the anger of clubs in Northern Ireland, where many people can pick up RTE.

Bryan Robson uses his column to discuss the best and worst referees in England.

Steve Foster gets a double page interview, where he states that Bobby Robson is scared of him because of his reputation, which is why he isn’t getting called up for the England squad.

In Scotland, Davie Dodds had a novel way to beat his goal drought, by dropping back into midfield. It worked, as he hit the back of the net in a recent 3-0 win over Celtic.

Jimmy Greaves gave his Star Letter Award to Mr N Bate of Cambridge, who complains about England not being seeded for the forthcoming World Cup Finals.

Greaves also uses his letters page to say that he was sick and tired of talk of a proposed breakaway Super League in English football.

It would turn out to be prophetic. When the Premier League was formed in 1992, ITV lost the rights, and Saint and Greavsie were no more.

Gary Mabbutt gets a full page profile for his versatility, with opinions varying as to where he fits best on the football pitch.

Across North London, Paul Davis says he doesn’t feel like a first team player at Arsenal, despite playing over 100 games, and has become more competitive in a bit to avoid being dropped.

Ipswich Town are the club who get a profile this week, currently struggling in the top flight.

Staying in East Anglia, Steve Bruce of Norwich City is desperate for the club to return to the top flight having been relegated the previous season, having spent seven years trying to reach it, before joining Norwich from Gillingham, only to be relegated after a season.

The magazine ends with a profile of Tony Dorigo, who reveals that his favourite singers are Bryan Ferry and Stevie Wonder, while his ambition for 1986 is to get an England Under 21 call-up when he gets British citizenship in October.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 23.12.1989

Clive Allen is the cover star of Match’s 1989 Christmas issue, as one decade ends and a new one is set to begin.

Mark Bright, Teddy Sheringham, Gary Mabbutt and Steve Ogrizovic are asked what they want for Christmas, with Mabbutt revealing he would like to spend Christmas Night with Michelle Pfeiffer.

Kerry Dixon does a double page interview with Match, where he reveals he is concentrating on Chelsea, and has given up hope of an England recall.

There is a poster of Bryan Robson’s recent goal for England against Yugoslavia, the fastest ever at Wembley, coming just 38 seconds into the game.

Match then dedicates a page to a statistical analysis of the clubs with the best defences in the English league.

Clive Allen gets a double page profile, where he reveals his favourite singers are Billy Joel and Phil Collins.

It wouldn’t be Christmas without bad presents, and Match canvasses various footballers for what their worst present is.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – SEPTEMBER 1992

Steve McManaman is mocked up as a superhero called McMana Man for the cover image, as he is described as English football’s superhero for the 1990s.

Ian Wright is interviewed and has modest ambitions for 92/93 – to get in the England team and to win the Premier League and FA Cup with Arsenal, predicting that he can make the most of the new backpass rule which stops goalkeepers picking the ball up from a backpass.

Steve McManaman is the subject of a double page feature, predicting he will become Liverpool’s greatest ever player, as well as tributes from the likes of Alan Hansen, Bruce Grobbelaar and Bradley Allen.

Don Howe is the subject of a profile, having just joined Chelsea as a coach, and his happy to be in that role rather than being a manager.

In world news, Marseille’s new signing Rudi Voeller believes that he can score the goals to win the European Cup for the French club.

Meanwhile, Manchester United have rejected a bid from Derby County to sign Bryan Robson, with the Rams hoping he would have had the same effect on them in the 90s as a similarly aged Dave Mackay did in the 1970s.

The forthcoming Premier League season is previewed, with all the Football Monthly journalists predicting that Arsenal will be champions in 1993.

Leeds United get a four page profile as they get set to defend their league title, looking at their success over the past four years under Howard Wilkinson.

The new Non League season is previewed, with Wycombe Wanderers being predicted to win promotion to the Football League.

Manchester City manager Peter Reid is interviewed, stating he stands by all his decisions, with City hoping to launch a title bid having come 5th in 1992.

In Scotland, the return of Trevor Steven to Rangers makes them favourites to win the title in 1993.

In competitions, you could win with Hummel, but you had a choice of a pair of boots or a replica shirt of either Benfica, Denmark or Real Madrid.

The preview of the new Irish League season predicts Glentoran to pip Linfield to the title and Ards to win the Irish Cup. Ards lost the Final while Linfield won the league.

In Republic of Ireland, there are concerns that easier access could affect attendances at domestic games, while Bohemians are predicted to win the league.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1985

Glenn Hoddle of England is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Or perhaps, not of England, if the headline is anything to go by.

This was also the week in Back To The Future II where Marty McFly visits 2015.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Steve McMahon, who has just joined Liverpool from Aston Villa, nearly three years after rejecting Liverpool to go to Villa Park.

Meanwhile, there are reports that England’s top clubs could be forming a breakaway Super League.

Cover star Glenn Hoddle is interviewed, finally becoming an England regular, and is confident of returning home from Mexico the following summer with the World Cup.

The cover headline “I’LL QUIT ENGLAND” refers to his club status, as he expresses his desire to play on the continent, which he did in 1987 when he signed for Monaco.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that Peter Barnes is worthy of a place in the England squad to provide competition for John Barnes and Chris Waddle.

Northern Ireland’s vital World Cup Qualifier away to Romania gets previewed, with manager Billy Bingham confidently predicting that Northern Ireland will finish 2nd in their group and head to Mexico.

Republic Of Ireland also have ambitions of going to Mexico, and have blooded Tony Cascarino into their squad in time for their vital game away to the Soviet Union.

Portsmouth manager Alan Ball gets a photo collage, as he aims to lead the club back to the top flight of English football.

Peter Shilton gets a double page feature as he becomes England’s most capped goalkeeper, complete with a tribute from Gordon Banks, who he replaced at Leicester City, Stoke City and England, with the headline “PETER SHILTON – KING OF KEEPERS”

West Germany manager Franz Beckenabauer feels this season’s European club competitions have been devalued by the absence of English clubs, while Canada have qualified for the World Cup for the first time in their history.

Meanwhile, Napoli failed in their bid to sign Hugo Maradona from Argentinos Juniors, the younger brother of Diego Maradona.

A dispute between the governing body and broadcasters meant that there were no games on TV, so Shoot did a double page photo collage of the best strikes.

In Scotland, there is a full page profile and a poster of Celtic.

In Wales, Mark Hughes was set to miss the opening games of Euro 88 Qualifying, due to a red card in an underage Euro qualifier against Yugoslavia in 1983.

Steve Cowan gets a full page feature, having just signed for Hibs and is hoping to put his injury problems behind him.

Bradford City get featured, as the club tries to recover from the tragic fire at their ground five months earlier.

Peter Reid uses his column to talk about Everton’s problems conceding goals, especially in the early moments of games.

Reid’s Everton team-mate Gary Lineker is happy, having found a Snooker Club near his home in Southport, and has managed to convince Willie Thorne to start supporting Everton.

Meanwhile, Portsmouth are trying to sign Paul Mariner from Arsenal.

The magazine ends with a profile of Davie McPherson of Rangers. His favourite music is Dire Straits and Bruce Springsteen.