MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : 90 MINUTES – 24.2.1996

Dennis Wise and Dan Petrescu are the cover stars of this week’s edition of 90 Minutes, which has declared Chelsea as the season’s surprise package.

In news, Manchester United have taken Mark Fish on trial. United have also signed a new kit deal with Umbro worth £40m – £65m.

Leeds United have been ordered bu UEFA to upgrade their dressing rooms for Euro 96, at a cost of £500,000.

There is a three page spread on Chelsea, with 90 minutes describing it as their finest team since the 70s.

Clyde are facing Rangers in the Scottish Cup, and 90 Minutes has an interview with Clyde’s ageing Celtic legend Charlie Nicholas.

Also getting a feature is Blackpool, after it is claimed that their stadium is being haunted by the ghost of Admiral Nelson.

In competitions, you could spend a night with Paul Merson.

As Euro 96 approaches, there is a full page profile on the French team, so good, that David Ginola and Eric Cantona can’t get a game.

90 Minutes Live canvasses supporters at Coventry City v Manchester City for the worst refereeing decision they have ever seen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.9.1985

England’s new star striker Gary Lineker shares cover space with Ian Rush, ahead of a vital week of World Cup Qualifiers, with Rush stating that Wales will destroy Scotland.

Rush gets a double page spread, saying that Wales will win and set up a Play-Off against a team from Oceania, due to Scotland missing the suspended Graeme Souness.

Unsurprisingly, Scotland think they will get the win, according to Shoot columnist Willie Miller.

The match ended in a 1-1 draw, a result which sent Scotland into a Play-Off against Australia, which they won 2-0 on aggregate to reach the World Cup in Mexico.

The game will be remembered for the death of Scotland manager Jock Stein, who collapsed on the touchline moments before the final whistle.

Sammy McIlroy gets interviewed about Northern Ireland’s game in Turkey, expecting Turkey to provide difficult opponents despite losing 8-0 to England earlier in the group.

Kevin Sheedy gets interviewed about Republic Of Ireland’s chances of reaching the World Cup, stating that they can do it. Sheedy had yet to win an away game in his international career, and would need to start doing so, with trips to Switzerland and Soviet Union coming up.

England’s game against Romania is previewed, with manager Bobby Robson singing the praises of Gary Lineker, who had only made his international debut earlier that year.

Bryan Robson uses his column to focus on players who are aiming to head to Mexico next summer, such as Adrian Heath, Paul Walsh, Peter Davenport, Steve Williams and Remi Moses.

Celtic’s new star Alan McInally gets a double page spread, while Rangers also get a double page spread. Well, Queens Park Rangers.

Justin Fashanu also gets a profile as he hopes to get Brighton promoted from the Second Division.

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to express his fears after Scotland manager Jock Stein considers picking only domestic based players after having problems getting access to English based players.

One Scottish striker not worried about not getting picked is Kenny Dalglish, also player-manager at Liverpool, telling Shoot he’ll have no hesitation in dropping himself.

Meanwhile, there is disharmony with the West Germany squad, due to a row breaking out between Berndt Schuster and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge. Schuster was currently in international exile due to a disagreement with manager Franz Beckenbauer.

A dispute with broadcasters means that no club games in England are televised, so Shoot does double page photos of some of the best action.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6.12.1980

We go back to the week before John Lennon died, as Ian Wallace and Peter Ward of reigning European Champions Nottingham Forest are the cover stars of Shoot, billed as “Forest’s Tiny Terrors”

As you open the magazine, four top flight stars – Vince Hilare, Joe Blyth, John Craggs and Brian Horton are interviewed on the title race, and they all expect Liverpool to win their 3rd successive title in 1981. They finished 5th as Aston Villa won the title. Winning the European Cup made up for it though.

It’s the Quarter-Finals of the League Cup, and Shoot predicts a last four line-up of Liverpool, Coventry, Spurs and Man City. Three out of four were right, with West Ham beating Spurs the only one they got wrong.

Clive Allen uses his column to comment that he has now played for eleven managers so far in his short career, headlined as “My team of managers”

Newly appointed QPR manager Terry Venables is interviewed, stating that he is wary of making too many changes.

In news, Tottenham Hotspur manager Keith Burkinshaw believes that Chris Hughton has made a mistake by choosing to play for Republic Of Ireland instead of England, while Blackpool manager Alan Ball expects Colin Morris of Blackpool to be a million pound player some day.

Cover stars Ian Wallace and Peter Ward get a feature, as their role at Nottingham Forest is changing football as the days of lumping it up to the big man are now over.

18 year old Paul Walsh gets a feature, being described “The most exciting Charlton player in 25 years”

Danny McGrain uses his column to comment on Scottish clubs all being out of Europe before Christmas, blaming it due to “inexperience”

In posters, there was a Newport County team poster, while Trevor Francis and David O’Leary are advertising Adidas and Mitre.

In adverts, Kevin Keegan is flogging Grundig radios, and the England squad are flogging Trebor Mints.

There is a full page profile of Bernd Schuster’s protracted move from Cologne to Barcelona, with a chronological diary of events.

Leicester City get a full page club profile.

Gary Mabbutt gets a profile after overcoming Diabetes to break into Bristol Rovers team.

Shoot asks four top flight players what foreign league they would like to play in if they were to leave England. Joe Jordan would like to play in West Germany (he would eventually play in Italy), Eric Gates wants to play in Spain, Peter Barnes believes Argentina would suit him, while Craig Johnston wants to play in West Germany, before returning to Australia.

Shoot does a double page spread on three youngsters looking to break into the Scotland squad in time for the 1982 World Cup – Charlie Nicholas (Celtic), John MacDonald (Rangers) and Jim Leighton (Aberdeen)

Talking of the 1982 World Cup, Gordon Cowans hopes to be in England’s squad for it, as well has having a title medal to his name with Aston Villa.

England are offered some advice from Southampton’s Yugoslav defender Ivan Golac, who says that England fans are too critical of their team.

The magazine ends with a profile of Arthur Albiston, who lists his favourite singers as Donna Summer and George Benson.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.5.1983

There’s a Scottish theme to this edition of Shoot, with Kenny Dalglish and Charlie Nicholas sharing the cover with Aberdeen, facing Real Madrid in the European Cup Winners Cup Final.

As you open the magazine, there are features on Dalglish and Nicholas, voted Most Exciting Player and Most Exciting Young Player respectively.

In news, Manchester United, Ipswich Town and West Ham United are showing an interest in Leicester City’s Gary Lineker, while West Bromwich Albion have denied that Martin Jol and Romeo Zondervan will be leaving the club.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to express his delight at being recalled to the England squad, and paying tribute to Manchester United team-mate Martin Buchan ahead of his testimonial.

Another United player with England ambitions is Gary Bailey, who tells Shoot that he is ready for a call-up. Shoot lists rivals for a place in the squad, which includes Andy Goram of Oldham Athletic.

Across Manchester, Kevin Bond tells Shoot of his delight at winning over Manchester City supporters following a difficult start to his time at the club.

Following Jimmy Case’s winning goal from a free-kick for Brighton in the FA Cup Semi-Final, Shoot does a double page spread on the importance of goals from set pieces.

There is a feature on 15 year old Dean Vokes, who won a competition to be Assistant Manager to Malcolm MacDonald at Fulham for a day. Fulham beat Charlton 2-1.

As the 1982-1983 season comes to an end, Shoot does a feature on four hat-trick during the season, by Clive Allen, Ian Rush, Luther Blissett and Gary brooke

Aberdeen’s match against Real Madrid gets previewed with Alex Ferguson doing a profile of the Aberdeen squad for Shoot.

There is also a profile of the Real Madrid squad.

Bobby Russell of Rangers uses the Tartan Talk column to reveal that he planned on emigrating to New Zealand as a teenager, but red tape stopped it, something he says he is grateful for in retrospect.

Phil Thompson uses his column to speak of his pride at winning his 7th title medal, a record for a player in English football, predicting that there will be more to come.

In West Germany, football authorities have expressed concern at falling attendances in the top flight.

Shoot does a feature on Andy Ritchie and Terry Connor, who have moved opposite ways in a player swap between Leeds ans Brighton.

England are hosting the European Youth Championship, with England manager Graham Taylor, who would be appointed senior manager in 1990, praising the youth football of neighbours and holders Scotland.

Gary Shaw uses his column to congratulate Aston Villa team-mate Peter Withe on being selected for the England team for their recent match against Hungary.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Flanagan of QPR, who reveals his favourite singers are Joe Jackson and Elkie Brookes.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1991

Bryan Robson, in action against Notts County, is the cover star, with the headline “Robbo’s Back”, as he is interviewed in this edition.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on Wales European Championship Qualifier in Germany, where Wales need a draw to virtually qualify for the finals in Sweden.

Jimmy Greaves assesses the two teams and predicts a win for Germany, and so it proved, with Germany winning 4-1.

Bryan Robson’s interview is part of Shoot’s preview of England’s European Championship Qualifier against Turkey. Turkey had been good opponents for Robson, with 5 goals in his 3 previous appearances against them.

England’s previous game against Turkey saw Robson left out of the squad, and he thought his international career was over at the age of 34, but his recent form for Manchester United saw him earn a recall.

As it turned out, the game against Turkey was Robson’s last cap for England.

Another player making an England comeback was Stuart Pearce, who explains that he was left out of the squad for the recent friendly against Germany as he was serving a domestic suspension.

Elsewhere in the group, Republic Of Ireland face a crunch game in Poland, and Shoot interviews Mick McCarthy in preparation of this.

In news, Charlie Nicholas had all his medals stolen after a burglary at his house, while Celtic have had a bid rejected for Terry Phelan, while Chelsea are planning a move to sign Matt Le Tissier.

Also in Scotland, John Robertson of Hearts gets a double page interview where he says that Hearts are determined to bounce back after defeat against Celtic, their first of the season. Robertson also gives Shoot the lowdown on his Hearts team-mates.

Peter Ndlovu of Coventry City gets interviewed s he adjusts to life in England, telling Shoot that he mostly listens to the radio and watched TV.

Also adjusting to life in a new country is David Platt, who tells Shoot he is enjoying life in Italy, despite Bari not winning a game and their manager resigning.

Talking of English players in Italy, former AC Milan striker Mark Hately rubbishes former Bari striker Paul Rideout’s claim that no English striker has come back from Italy a better player.

I wonder did they discuss the matter a few months later in the dressing room when Rideout signed for Rangers?

Talking of Rangers, a reader writes to Jimmy Greaves to say that Rangers will continue to be minnows on a European stage due to a lack of competition in Scotland, while another reader asks about the possibility of Leeds winning the league, and Greaves says they need Lee Chapman to start scoring in order for that to happen.

In competitions, you could win a pair of Quaser boots, and get to meet Gary Lineker, Matt Le Tisser or Charlie Nicholas at one of their respective team’s home games.

Tony Cottee gets a profile, revealing that if he wasn’t a footballer, he would be a Fireman, or work for his dad as an Insurance Broker.

In ads, there was an advert for a teen mag called Look-In (possibly an IPC publication, I can’t verify) which had Rik Mayall as it’s cover star, talking about his role in Drop Dead Fred.

Alongside that, is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which comes with free Pro Set cards.

The magazine ends with a double page feature on Scotland’s European Championship Qualifier in Bucharest where a win would virtually guarantee qualification to the finals.

They lost, but other results went their way which meant they made it to Sweden.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9.11.1985

Bryan Robson is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, as he aims to lead Manchester United to their first title in 19 years.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on the decline of Ipswich Town, who have gone from title challengers to fighting against relegation, with stars deserting over the previous three years since Bobby Robson left to become England manager.

In news, Frank McAvennie suggests that John Robertson and/or Gordon Durie could be the next Scottish strikers to move to an English club. One player not moving from Scotland to England is Richard Gough, after Dundee United rejected a bid from Aston Villa to sign him.

Norman Whiteside won Young Player Of The Month, while Manchester United offered new contracts to Arthur Albiston and Remi Moses.

Meanwhile, Trevor Francis hits back at Malcolm MacDonald, who criticised his continued selection for the England team.

Shoot’s editorial pleads for English fans to behave whenever they are abroad, after England had been allowed to enter the qualifiers for Euro 88.

Gary Lineker gets a double page photo story of his recent hat-trick against Turkey, the 34th hat-trick by and England player since World War II.

Another young player doing well is Alan Dickens, who is hoping to break free from the shadows of Trevor Brooking.

You wouldn’t have seen any of Lineker or Dickens goals due to a TV blackout caused by a dispute between the governing body and boradcasters, so Shoot does a double page photo collage of the best goals in that time.

Mickey Thomas hits back at his critics, having just signed for West Brom, and hoping to keep them in Division One.

Argentina’s preparations for the World Cup in Mexico have been rocked by a dispute between manager Carlos Bilardo and players Daniel Passarella and Ubaldo Filol, after Bilardo declared the only player guaranteed a place in the squad was Diego Maradona.

Terry Venables criticises Andoni Goicochea of Athletic Bilbao, after his playacting got a Barcelona player sent-off in a recent game between the sides.

Meanwhile, Michael Laudrup urges his club Juventus to sign his 16 year old brother Brian, who he describes as being better than him.

Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson, hoping to lead the club to a 3rd successive title, states that any team wanting to win the title can’t afford to lose more than four games.

Celtic won the league with six defeats that season with Aberdeen finishing 4th, with Ferguson leaving Aberdeen soon afterwards.

Meanwhile, Watford defender Nigel Callaghan concedes he won’t be going to the World Cup, but wants to be an England player beyond 1986.

Shoot interviews a player from each division to see what life as a footballer is really like, with Frank Lampard of 4th division Southend revealing that the club are considering flying to their away match at Wrexham.

In Scotland, 21 year old Andy Goram has caused a sensation by getting his first international call-up and keeping a clean sheet in the friendly against East Germany, as he provides competition for regular choice Jim Leighton.

Based in the North-West of England, Goram was contacted by Arthur Albiston of Manchester United to offer him a lift to the squad.

Talking of Scottish footballers, Charlie Nicholas uses his column to state that he won’t be signing for Liverpool.

Staying in Scotland, St Mirren get a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves Star Letter came from Jeremy Butler from Southampton, who complains that teams like Canada devalues the World Cup, but Jimmy disagrees with him.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 24.5.1986

Bryan Robson, in action for England, is the cover star as the 1986 World Cup gets closer.

The magazine opens with rumoured tansfer activity by the Old Firm, with Rangers wanting to sign Richard Gough (he would eventually sign in 1987, after a year at Tottenham Hotspur) from Dundee United and Andy Goram (It took until 1991, from Hibs, for him to join) while Celtic want to sign Stevie Clarke from St Mirren. That is ex Chelsea player and West Brom manager Steve Clarke.

Another Scottish player potentially on the move is John Robertson of Hearts, who has been attracting attention from Tottenham Hotspur.

With the World Cup getting closer, there is a double page spread previewing Poland’s chances.

Canada also get a preview. UK fans will get a glimpse of them before the tournament as they play England in a friendly at a 16,000 capacity venue, due to England manager Bobby Robson insisting that the game be played on grass, and not artificial grass that is used in Canada’s bigger stadiums.

Bryan Robson uses his column to argue the case for England as World Cup winners, giving a brief profile of the 22 players tasked with taking the trophy home from Mexico.

Swindon Town won the 4th division, and this gets a double page spread, with manager Lou Macari giving most of the credit to defender Colin Calderwood.

Also promoted and getting a double page spread were Norwich City.

In World Cup news, Socrates was left out of Brazil’s friendly against East Germany, while West Germany manager Franz Beckenbauer says this World Cup has come too soon for his team, but they have a great chance of winning the trophy in 1990.

The centre page poster is of AC Milan’s English duo of Ray Wilkins and Mark Hateley, settling in in Italy, complete with family portraits. Former Motherwell player Tom Hately wasn’t pictured, because he wasn’t born until 1989.

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to discuss the vacant manager’s position at Arsenal, suggesting that his preference is Alex Ferguson or Billy McNeill.

John Fashanu gets a full page profile, described as “articulate TV and radio star who listens to Dire Straits and Phil Collins”. His biggest ambition is to appear on The Cosby Show. Fashanu would be going to the World Cup in Mexico as a pundit for Nigerian TV. Fashanu describes himself as “Mean and nasty”

The magazine goes green for a few pages, with features on Northern Ireland and Plymouth Argyle.

There was an advert for the following week’s edition, which had a World Cup wallchart.

It was a World Cup that Trevor Francis won’t be playing. He tells Shoot of his disappointment of not being selected for England, and that he’s not planning on leaving Italy, where he is currently based.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.10.1986

Mark Hughes, in the early months of his first season at Barcelona, is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot.

His fellow cover star Kerry Dixon is fighting back at critics who criticised his performance in England’s recent friendly defeat against Sweden.

Dixon will be on your TV screens at the weekend as his Chelsea team take on Manchester United, with United goalkeeper wanting revenge for the previous season’s defeat to Chelsea at Old Trafford during the title run-in. The previous season’s meeting was between two teams at the top, this time around it’s between teams in the bottom half.

In news, John Wark is wanted by Hearts, Aberdeen and Norwich, while Mickey Thomas is wanted by Wichita Wings in North America.

One man who did move was Kevin Richardson, who moved from Everton to Watford, and got a phone call from Elton John welcoming him to the club, and believed it was a wind-up from his former Everton team-mates.

Everton supporters with a tenner spare could join their Fan Club, advertised in this edition.

There were plans for a testimonial for Pat Jennings before the end of 1986 at Windsor Park between an All-Star British XI to take on a European XI.

In the editor’s column, editor Peter Stewart rubbishes the idea of a proposed “Super League”, pointing to the success of smaller clubs such as Wimbledon, Oxford and Charlton.

The same column also praises Luton Town for their ban on away supporters at Kenilworth Road, as they aim to combat hooliganism.

Brian Clough tells Shoot that he doesn’t want Forest star Franz Carr to get an England call-up, because his former club Blackburn will be due a payment as part of the transfer arrangement.

Talking of England, they’ve been invited to a tournament of former World Cup winners in Brazil in 1989 to commemorate 75 years of football in Brazil. England were paired in the same group as Brazil and Uruguay.

It was a tournament that Enzo Bearzot, Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning manager, won’t be taking part in, having just resigned from his role as national team manager.

Mark Wright is on the comeback trail after an injury during Southampton’s FA Cup Semi-Final against Liverpool which ruled him out of the World Cup in Mexico. He talks to Shoot about his experiences coming back from injury.

In Glasgow, it is young players that are the talk of the town, with Shoot doing a feature on breakthrough stars Tony Shepherd (Celtic), Ian Durrant and Derek Ferguson (Rangers)

Another (relative) youngster making a mark was 32 year old Wolves manager Brian Little, who gets a double page spread in what Shoot describe as “Football’s hardest job”

Cover star Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, where he lists his favourite things. Since you ask, his favourite bands are The Jam and U2.

Also getting a double page profile are Derby County, who Shoot describe as “on the march”, and so it proved as they got promoted to Division One in 1987.

The magazine ends with Charlie Nicholas uses his column to urge Scotland fans to stand by newly appointed manager Andy Roxburgh after a disappointing start to their Euro 88 Qualifying campaign.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 8.9.1984

Glenn Hoddle is the main cover star of Shoot, alongside a British player abroad, Graeme Souness, and a British player with aspirations of playing abroad, Luther Blissett.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on Gordon Cowans, who has ambitions of going to Mexico. Not to play in the Mexican League, but the 1986 World Cup. His feature had the headline “Memo to Bobby Robson, save a World Cup place for Gordon Cowans”

He didn’t go to Mexico.

Having just rejoined Watford for AC Milan, Luther Blissett has stated that he wants to play abroad again. Before Watford fans paniced, he clarified that it was European competition for the Vicarage Road side that he was wanting to play abroad.

Staying with Watford, manager Graham Taylor had put a £2m fee on Maurice Johnston, who has handed in a transfer request.

In Scotland, Hibs and George Best were in trouble with the SFA after Best played for Hibs in Jackie McNamara’s Testimonial, but was unregistered.

Craig Johnston had missed the start of the season for Liverpool in order to be with his wife and soon to born child, his wife having insisted that the child be born in Australia.

Manchester United’s three new signings Jesper Olsen, Gordon Strachan and Alan Brazil are part of a centre page poster, as United look to win the league for the first time since 1967.

As you turn the page, there is a double page feature on Strachan, where he reveals he supports Hibs, and turned down the chance to sign for United in 1971, having already given his word to Dundee.

Staying in Scotland, new Rangers signing Cammy Fraser was introduced to life at Ibrox by manager Jock Wallace ordering to shave off his moustache.

Peter Shreeves, new manager of Tottenham Hotspur, gets a double page spread, insisting he isn’t afraid of the challenge of succeeding Keith Burkinshaw.

Shoot uses star signs to try and predict the future for footballers such as Neville Southall, Kenny Sansom, Glenn Hoddle and Andy Gray.

QPR get a full page feature, with Ian Stewart giving the lowdown on the club.

In news, Mark McGhee begins his career at Hamburg with a suspension, having been sent-off in a pre-season friendly.

Jimmy Greaves received a letter in support of a Great Britain football team. Greaves replies that he agrees with the idea, but that football shouldn’t be in the Olympics.

The highlight of this edition comes in the form of a double page photo of Trevor Francis and Graeme Souness enjoying their new life in Italy, at Sampdoria, out on a boat trip together, all oiled up and dressed in nothing but Speedos. It is an image that cannot be unseen.

Wilf Rostron of Watford tells Shoot who his favourite wingers are : Pat Nevin, John Barnes and Mark Chamberlain.

Ian Rush uses his column to declare that England can be successful by learning from Liverpool, and that Graeme Souness is better than Michel Platini, and will show it in Serie A.

Beside Rush’s column, is a full page report on the recent Charity Shield, where Everton beat Liverpool 2-0, with the headline “Revenge!”, after Liverpool had beaten Everton in the previous season’s League Cup Final.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise attackers that have recently been on the move – Joe Jordan of Southampton and the Spurs duo of Clive Allen and John Chiedozie.

Charlie Nicholas is prominent towards the end of this issue, telling Shoot he is happy at Arsenal, then appearing in an advert for Nike alongside Glenn Hoddle and Ian Rush.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.10.1985

Norman Whiteside, still only twenty years old, is this week’s cover star, as Shoot reveals what he is really like.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page article called Tottenham Scotspur, focusing on the lack of Scottish talent at White Hart Lane, with only youngster Ally Dick being on the books.

Dick is described as a name for tomorrow, but his tomorrow would be outside the UK, most notably at Ajax, where he was a substitute in the 1988 European Cup Winners Cup Final.

Shoot suggests Scottish talent who Spurs should sign, such as Paul McStay, Maurice Malpas, Jim Leighton (who would end up across North London at Arsenal for a short loan spell in 1991) and Richard Gough, who would sign for Spurs the following summer.

In news, Kevin Keegan has quit England to live in Spain so he can play Golf all year round.

Ian Rush uses his column to reveal that new Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish is much tougher than his predecessors Joe Fagin and Bob Paisley.

The FAI invoked a UEFA rule to stop RTE showing live coverage of top flight games in England on a Saturday afternoon, to stop viewers in Northern Ireland watching it instead of attending games at Irish League clubs. Their own domestic league, League Of Ireland, would have been unaffected due to playing on Sundays.

Having suggested possible signings for Spurs earlier, Shoot report that Spurs are looking at signing either Alvin Martin or Steve Bruce.

Bryan Robson uses his column to appeal to referees to stop allowing goalkeepers to move before a penalty kick is taken.

Charlie Nicholas recent goal against Coventry gets a double page photo collage.

Cover star Norman Whiteside gets a double page spread, where he is described as a tough guy with a soft centre, and reveals that he misses Gordon McQueen in the dressing room, who he describes as almost as funny as Jimmy Cricket.

Shoot goes behind the scenes at Aberdeen, where manager Alex Ferguson says the basis of their success (prophetically, considering his future success at Manchester United) is young players brought through the club. He also describes cook Belle Morrison as his bets signing.

When this magazine went to print, there was no coverage of English football on TV (contradicting the earlier story about RTE) meaning no games were filmed. The impact was felt abroad, as Scandinavian fans were now deserting English clubs for Italian and West German sides, with both league now being broadcast there instead.

Brian Clough uses his column to reveal that he’ll miss recently departed Southampton manager Lawrie McMenemy supplying him with strawberries whenever his side visits The Dell, and expresses his opposition to the idea of groundsharing in England.

Lee Chapman of Sheffield Wednesday has a simple ambition for this season, to get more goals than stitches.

Tommy Cannon, described as “The suave half of Cannon and Ball”, gets a full page feature having just joined the board at Rochdale. The story is accompanied by a picture of him posing in a Rochdale kit.

Frank McGarvey, enjoying a successful second spell at St Mirren, tells Shoot he regrets not staying at Liverpool longer.

Steve Hodge, a recent Aston Villa signing, tells Shoot he has joined “A team of the future”. Aston Villa were relegated in 1987, by which point Hodge had left to sign for Tottenham Hotspur.

Charlton Athletic get a feature, as they are forced to moved out of The Valley due to it not being considered safe, and are playing their first match at Selhurst Park. Charlton wouldn’t play at The Valley again until 1992.