MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – DECEMBER 2002

Having just broken into the Everton team, teenage sensation Wayne Rooney give an interview to When Saturday Comes. Well, sort of.

A blank speech bubble represents the fact that Everton manager David Moyes has blocked media requests to interview his young player.

The editorial focuses on racism in football, most notably at the European Championship Qualifier between Slovakia and England, but warns that football authorities in England need to address concerns closer to home.

There is a profile of former Belgium goalkeeper Jean-Marie Pfaff, now forging a new career as a Reality TV star in a Flemish version of The Osbournes.

There is a feature on four clubs at differing ends of the football pyramid who are looking to move out of their current ground to a new one – Wimbledon, Chelsea, York City and Brentford.

In Scotland, there is a feature on the race for one of the more invisible honours, 3rd place, aka The Best Of The Rest after Rangers and Celtic, looking at those clubs aiming for that spot.

A more curious phenomenon in recent years was Masters Football, which WSC likened to ageing rock stars only playing hits from 20 years previously.

There is a feature on “lost footballers”, big money signings on high wages. The poster boy of this feature is Mark Bosnich, earning £40,000 in Chelsea’s reserves.

This edition focuses on young players, with a look at the number of French coaches at underage level in England.

Cover star Wayne Rooney is part of a feature looking at the history of hype of young players in English football.

There is also a feature on club football in Czech Republic, due to improved perfomances in Europe this season, with many teams boosted by Euro 96 stars coming home to play their club football.

Yeovil Town get a feature, so long a famous Non League giantkiller, and now on the verge of joining the giants they used to kill.

The rivalry between Cardiff City and Swansea City gets a feature, being described as becoming a poisonous affair in recent years.

The magazine ends with a brief look at the history of Cheltenham Town’s highlights and lowlights.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 29.5.1999

David May, David Beckham, Teddy Sheringham, and the FA Cup are the cover stars of Match, as Manchester United have just won the double, a third in six years, but there’s more to come.

Unfortunately, printing deadlines mean that only a preview, rather than a review, of the European Cup Final against Bayern Munich can appear in the magazine.

In the news section, there’s a random story of a West Ham celebrity fan having a kickabout at West Ham’s training group with Frank Lampard and Rio Ferdinand ……. Tamzin Outhwaite from Eastenders.

Meanwhile, Alan Thompson predicts big things for Aston Villa in 1999-2000, despite their 1998-1999 title challenge falling apart after Christmas. They finished 6th in 2000, like in 1999, but did reach the FA Cup Final.

Peter Beagrie, having just helped Bradford into the Premier League, is interviewed for a feature called “My First …..” where he reveals his first concert was Diana Ross at the NEC in Birmingham, his first film was Jaws, and his first kit was QPR.

The FA Cup Final, where Manchester United beat Newcastle United 2-0, gets a five page round-up, mostly pictures, with quotes, with a page dedicated to a mimute by minute report of the game.

The rest of the magazine is dubbed “Champions Special”, dedicated to teams that have won their league. First up, is Rangers, and a double page interview with Andrei Kanchelskis ahead of the Scottish Cup Final between Rangers and Celtic.

Meanwhile, Sunderland (Division One) Fulham (Division Two) Brentford (Division Three) and Cheltenham (Conference) all get full page reviews of their title winning seasons.

Meanwhile, there is a five page preview of the European Cup Final, focusing on an interview with Ryan Giggs, while Yorke and Cole get a joint interview as well.

Bayern Munich get a full page, written by Steffan Effenberg, listing five reasons why they would win, that they were underdogs, well prepared, good at penalties, under no pressure, and most importantly, United had Roy Keane missing.

It was a bit laughable of Bayern Munich to pretend they were underdogs considering they actually won their group (though both games were draws) ahead of United.

There is a centre page poster for the game, where fans can fill in blank spaces with the team line-ups and goalscorers.

Manchester’s other team, City, also had a big match that week, as they headed to Wembley for the Division Two Play-Off Final, and Match does a double page interview with Nicky Weaver.

But it’s not all about Champions, as Dennis Bergkamp looks back at Arsenal’s season, where they missed out on the title by a point.

Gareth Southgate is interviewed about Aston Villa’s New Year collapse (They were top of the league at Christmas) and heaps praise on youngsters in their team such as Gareth Barry, Lee Hendrie and Darius Vassell.

In the letters page, a West Bromwich Albion fan worries that his side might lose top goalscorer Lee Hughes. He left for Coventry in a big money move in 2001, before returning to Albion, before being sacked by the club after being sentence to prison for causing death by dangerous driving.

In other letters, a young Wigan Athletic fan suggests that the town’s football team are in the process of becoming more high profile than it’s rugby team.

This week, is also one of the very first weeks where you contribute to Match’s letters page via e-mail. Modern technology.

Meanwhile, you could do a quiz on Aston Villa right-back Steve Watson, if you wanted.

Talking of quizzes, Karl-Heinz Reidle took on Gianfranco Zola in a football quiz, with Zola winning 9 (out of 10) to 8.

It was Karl-Heinz Reidle’s inability to answer who got promoted from Division Three that cost him.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – JULY 1999

The summer of 1999 is the focus for this edition of “The Magazine Archive”, looking at Four Four Two and their end of season awards.

Bizarrely, despite winning The Treble, there were no Man United players featured on the cover.

Cheltenham Town’s promotion to the Football League was the subject of parody with a mock tourist brochure being drawn up showcasing the delights of Cheltenham.

A column by Paul Simpson looking at footballing achievements remarks that Man United’s treble still has a long way to go before matching Linfield’s Seven trophies in 1922.

The always funny in retrospect feature “The Boy’s A Bit Special” makes an appearance profiling current Norwich City player Adam Drury, Clinton Morrison, and Seth Johnson, the player often used to personify the transfer excesses at Leeds United under the Peter Ridsdale/David O’Leary.

In the letters page, one reader wrote to express his opinions on the behaviour of players during a recent Old Firm game, and how their actions can affect crowd behaviour.

Given the recent furore about the Scottish Cup Replay between the two sides, it seems some things never change.

Dwight Yorke won the award for “Best Premiership Player” with Didier Domi being ranked 50th.

Kieron Dyer, who that summer signed for Newcastle United was voted best in Division One, while ex Portadown player Peter Kennedy was voted 36th.

In Division Two, then uncapped Northern Ireland players Maik Taylor and Steve Robinson were in the Top Ten.

Kevin Horlock was 41st, 4 places below former Glentoran player Glen Little.

It’s not too hard which goal was voted the best that season. If you haven’t worked it out yet, it was Ryan Giggs goal in the FA Cup Semi-Final Replay.

In the world of advertising, David Seaman, quite appropriately given the name, is advertising Admiral Aportswear.

Four pages are dedicated to the Youth World Cup, held in Africa (Nigeria to be precise) which was won by Spain.

History repeated itself when Spain left Africa with the World Cup trophy 11 years later, this time, the senior trophy.

A quick look through Wikipedia reveals that Iker Casillas, Carlos Marchena and Xavi played for Spain in both tournaments.

There is a feature on English goalkeepers and why there are so few of them.

A chart is made of the goalkeepers at each Premier League club, with comments on the situation.

For Manchester United, the comment reads “Bad news for Nick Culkin as Peter Schmeichel is likely to be replaced by Edwin Van Der Sar”

Van Der Sar did replace Schmeichel, unfortunately, he wasn’t signed until 2005.

The “More Than A Game” feature focused on the Welsh derby between Cardiff City and Swansea City.

In 1999, both clubs were in the bottom division of the Football League in run down stadiums. How times change.