MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.5.1977

David O’Leary is one of the cover stars as the 1976-1977 nears it’s finale.

Jack Charlton (Middlesbrough) and Johnny Giles (West Bromwich Albion) get a double page feature, as the two former Leeds players have left managerial positions in recent weeks.

Ray Kennedy gets a full page profile, as he aims to make English football history, aiming to become the first player to win the double twice, having been a part of Arsenal’s 1971 double winning team.

With Liverpool losing to Manchester United in that year’s FA Cup Final, the feat wasn’t achieve until various Manchester United players did it in 1996, with some more doing it in 1999 (Peter Schmeichel, Denis Irwin, Roy Keane and Ryan Giggs winning it three times)

Ashley Cole and Nicholas Anelka are the only players to win the double with two different clubs, after Kennedy was denied this achievement.

Shoot does a double page spread, offering Martin Peters, Pat Rice and Howard Kendall an opportunity to reflect on the season, and why their respective sides didn’t win a trophy.

Gerry Francis uses his column to suggest that anybody wanting to be a manager in England should get the relevant coaching and management qualifications, similar to the structure in West Germany.

In news, Arsenal manager Terry Neill has denied a story in Shoot that Frank Stapleton and Liam Brady are on their way to Liverpool. Middlesbrough midfielder Graeme Souness is unsettled at Ayresome Park

St Mirren manager Alex Ferguson has been fined £25 for comments to the referee after his side were eliminated from the Scottish Cup by Motherwell.

Aston Villa goalkeeper John Burridge gets a full page profile about facing penalties.

In the centre pages, there is a poster of the Aston Villa team, including the League Cup, which they won in 1977.

John Greig uses his column to explain why Rangers didn’t win the league.

Sheffield Wednesday’s teenage goalkeeper Chris Turner gets interviewed, having broke into the team and become a regular of the team he supported growing up.

In world news, Idi Amin is described as “The Generous General”, having rewarded the national team with a free holiday in Libya as a reward for winning the East African Challenge Cup.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.12.1985

Paul Walsh of Liverpool is the cover star of Shoot as 1985 approaches Christmas.

In a double page interview, Walsh reveals he was conned into staying at Anfield, and has now been rewarded with an extended run in the team, and is eyeing up a place in England’s World Cup squad.

In news, Chris Turner wants to leave Manchester United due to a lack of first-team opportunities. Across Manchester, City defender Mick McCarthy has been out injured, rumoured to have been suffered in a sprint with an Irish journalist who had £20 bet he could beat him in a race, in the build-up to a recent international.

Staying in the Republic Of Ireland, their state broadcaster has signed a deal to broadcast English games at 3pm on a Saturday, much to the anger of clubs in Northern Ireland, where many people can pick up RTE.

Bryan Robson uses his column to discuss the best and worst referees in England.

Steve Foster gets a double page interview, where he states that Bobby Robson is scared of him because of his reputation, which is why he isn’t getting called up for the England squad.

In Scotland, Davie Dodds had a novel way to beat his goal drought, by dropping back into midfield. It worked, as he hit the back of the net in a recent 3-0 win over Celtic.

Jimmy Greaves gave his Star Letter Award to Mr N Bate of Cambridge, who complains about England not being seeded for the forthcoming World Cup Finals.

Greaves also uses his letters page to say that he was sick and tired of talk of a proposed breakaway Super League in English football.

It would turn out to be prophetic. When the Premier League was formed in 1992, ITV lost the rights, and Saint and Greavsie were no more.

Gary Mabbutt gets a full page profile for his versatility, with opinions varying as to where he fits best on the football pitch.

Across North London, Paul Davis says he doesn’t feel like a first team player at Arsenal, despite playing over 100 games, and has become more competitive in a bit to avoid being dropped.

Ipswich Town are the club who get a profile this week, currently struggling in the top flight.

Staying in East Anglia, Steve Bruce of Norwich City is desperate for the club to return to the top flight having been relegated the previous season, having spent seven years trying to reach it, before joining Norwich from Gillingham, only to be relegated after a season.

The magazine ends with a profile of Tony Dorigo, who reveals that his favourite singers are Bryan Ferry and Stevie Wonder, while his ambition for 1986 is to get an England Under 21 call-up when he gets British citizenship in October.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.10.1986

Mark Hughes, in the early months of his first season at Barcelona, is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot.

His fellow cover star Kerry Dixon is fighting back at critics who criticised his performance in England’s recent friendly defeat against Sweden.

Dixon will be on your TV screens at the weekend as his Chelsea team take on Manchester United, with United goalkeeper wanting revenge for the previous season’s defeat to Chelsea at Old Trafford during the title run-in. The previous season’s meeting was between two teams at the top, this time around it’s between teams in the bottom half.

In news, John Wark is wanted by Hearts, Aberdeen and Norwich, while Mickey Thomas is wanted by Wichita Wings in North America.

One man who did move was Kevin Richardson, who moved from Everton to Watford, and got a phone call from Elton John welcoming him to the club, and believed it was a wind-up from his former Everton team-mates.

Everton supporters with a tenner spare could join their Fan Club, advertised in this edition.

There were plans for a testimonial for Pat Jennings before the end of 1986 at Windsor Park between an All-Star British XI to take on a European XI.

In the editor’s column, editor Peter Stewart rubbishes the idea of a proposed “Super League”, pointing to the success of smaller clubs such as Wimbledon, Oxford and Charlton.

The same column also praises Luton Town for their ban on away supporters at Kenilworth Road, as they aim to combat hooliganism.

Brian Clough tells Shoot that he doesn’t want Forest star Franz Carr to get an England call-up, because his former club Blackburn will be due a payment as part of the transfer arrangement.

Talking of England, they’ve been invited to a tournament of former World Cup winners in Brazil in 1989 to commemorate 75 years of football in Brazil. England were paired in the same group as Brazil and Uruguay.

It was a tournament that Enzo Bearzot, Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning manager, won’t be taking part in, having just resigned from his role as national team manager.

Mark Wright is on the comeback trail after an injury during Southampton’s FA Cup Semi-Final against Liverpool which ruled him out of the World Cup in Mexico. He talks to Shoot about his experiences coming back from injury.

In Glasgow, it is young players that are the talk of the town, with Shoot doing a feature on breakthrough stars Tony Shepherd (Celtic), Ian Durrant and Derek Ferguson (Rangers)

Another (relative) youngster making a mark was 32 year old Wolves manager Brian Little, who gets a double page spread in what Shoot describe as “Football’s hardest job”

Cover star Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, where he lists his favourite things. Since you ask, his favourite bands are The Jam and U2.

Also getting a double page profile are Derby County, who Shoot describe as “on the march”, and so it proved as they got promoted to Division One in 1987.

The magazine ends with Charlie Nicholas uses his column to urge Scotland fans to stand by newly appointed manager Andy Roxburgh after a disappointing start to their Euro 88 Qualifying campaign.