EDINBLOG 2018

A milestone trip for me, as it was my tenth trip to the Edinburgh Fringe. My first time was in 2003 when I won a place on a Workshop, but I only saw a bit of the Fringe.

My first proper trip wasn’t until 2009, and it sort of came about by fluke.

I was waiting for a bus and had a lot of time to kill. I was wondering through HMV and saw a programme for the event. Having read through it on that bus journey to Dublin, I decided to book a trip. The rest is history, and i’ve been back every year since, apart from 2016 when I went to the European Championship instead.

I have travelled over at all stages of the month long festival. There’s no bad time to visit, but if you had to choose, definitely go in the middle. At the start, things are warming up. At the end, they are winding down. In the middle, is just perfect.

My choice of dates were more influenced by convenience, as I had other plans in Belfast in August that meant the middle of the month was the only time I would be available for a sustained trip.

When I go to Edinburgh, I usually have a weekend as part of my time there, but this time was different, as I stayed from Monday to Friday.

One advantage of being in Edinburgh on a Monday or Tuesday is that a lot of the shows have discounted ticket prices on those days.

The one downside of arriving in the middle of the event is, that some performers usually have a day or two days off during the middle week, so people you might want to see aren’t actually performing.

It’s not essential, but it is helpful if you get a copy of the programme (They are usually free in Waterstones) and have a plan, even if it is provisional, of what you want to see.

I might sound like i’m very organised, but the truth is I only finalised my list less then twelve hours before I flew out.

Upon arrival, I headed straight to the main Ticket Office in the Royal Mile, and got everything I wanted bar one, unable to get a ticket for Dylan Moran on Wednesday, or any other day unfortunately. I still had two days to get something sorted.

If you did arrive undecided about what to see, there are plenty of people and listings guides that are more than willing to help you decide what to see.

When you arrive at Edinburgh Airport, they have complimentary newspapers at Arrivals, including the Scottish Edition of The Times, which has a free pull-out. Of the papers you have to buy, The Scotsman and Edinburgh Evening News also have listings guides.

If you buy a copy of The Scotsman at a venue, you get a free goodie bag.

When I got mine on the Monday, it had a poncho in it, which was useful, unlike the free Suncream I got last year. We are in Scotland for crying out loud.

Another newspaper worth getting is the Scottish Edition of Metro, which is also free and comes with a section dedicated to the Edinburgh Festival.

Metro is also worth picking up for Rush Hour Crush, to laugh at the absolute oddballs who submit to it. I really wish we had Metro in Northern Ireland.

Each venue also has their own listings guide as well. Basically, there is plenty of reading material if you still haven’t decided what to see.

Earlier, when I referred to getting ready, that meant practicing my apologetic “I’m fine, thanks” to Flyerers, as you will be offered a lot of flyers during your stay.

As I arrived in Edinburgh, the weather was what would be described by locals as pishing doon, that’s rain to you and me. It would be that way for most of the week.

Thankfully, I had paid for early check-in. It wasn’t the weather for killing time, so I chanced it by seeing if I could check-in earlier than my early check-in, and my room was ready.

So, I unloaded my baggage and had a quick change into drier clothes, and my Edinburgh 2018 was ready to go.

My accommodation was in Cowgate, a brilliant location. Royal Mile, Waverley Station, Pleasance and Edinburgh University are all within a ten minute walk. I would make the most of this during the week.

Being a regular visitor to Edinburgh, I know how to navigate my way around the city. My first port of call was to Edinburgh University, where Assembly and Guilded Balloon were based, having a walk around the venue. There wasn’t a lot of people about, not that unsurprising due to the weather.

Monday was never going to be a busy day, but in late afternoon, I went to my first show, Battle Of The Superheroes, where four Comedians put their point across as to why their favourite Superhero is the best.

There seemed to be crossed wires as a lot of children turned up for the show, only to be told that it wasn’t really appropriate for kids.

You don’t have to be massively into comic books to enjoy the show. I don’t know the difference between DC and DC Thomson, nevermind DC and Marvel, and I still enjoyed.

The winner of this one was Mr Freeze (yes, you read that right) where it was argued that a lot of trouble could be avoided if Bruce Wayne just employed him to do Medical Research.

My main show on the Monday was Reginald D Hunter at EICC, a venue which is a bit remote from the main Fringe venues. This was acknowledged by Hunter during his set, saying that he keeps getting further away with his venues, his Edinburgh show next year will be in Glasgow.

Hunter is a big fan of the MF Word and a lot of other words you can’t say on TV. He was very funny, talking about how living in the UK for twenty years has made him appreciate irony around some of the events that happen when he visits his family in America.

On Tuesday morning, I went for a walk around George Street and Rose Street. It is good to escape from the Fringe for a while and see as much of the city as possible.

I also visited the site of Edinburgh Book Festival at Charlotte Square. Unfortunately, the events I wanted to see at it were taking place before or after my stay in Edinburgh. I had wanted to see Archie MacPherson do a talk, but ironically, it clashed with a football match I wanted to see.

What amused me was that Brian May was doing a talk about the history of photography. He was joined by a Professor called Roger Taylor. Yes, actually.

Another event which takes place at the same time is Fringe By The Sea, in North Berwick, a seaside town half an hour away by train which hosts concerts and shows. Unfortunately, the event had finished by the time I arrived, but i’ll be keeping an eye out for listings in future years in case our paths cross.

After escaping from the rain, it was time for my first show of the day, Hello Georgie Goodbye Best, a play about George Best’s lost weekend with Sinead Cusack in 1971.

Appropriately, for a show about football, it started at 3pm, although this was on a Tuesday afternoon, it was a show that will have spent a lot of it’s budget replacing smashed cutlery and dead fish.

Football was very much the theme of Tuesday, as in the evening I headed to Ainslie Park to see Edinburgh City take on Albion Rovers in the Scottish Challenge Cup.

Wednesday morning was spent in the University Area, hunting for bargains in the Charity Shops and Independent Shops in that area, as well as checking out some new murals that have appeared as part of a Community Project.

As it had just started raining, I decided to head to a free show, What Has The News Ever Done For Me?, where Comedian passionately argue why their favourite news story is the most important story in the world.

Problem was, I went to the venue it was held in last year, and it had moved.

I decided to cut my losses and go elsewhere, unaware that the venue it was in was across the street. Doh.

With a six hour gap in my schedule, I was looking for a show for late afternoon or early evening. I narrowed my choices down to Angela Barnes or Lucy Porter.

I decided to use the most foolproof model and let the people decide, and a Twitter Poll went in Lucy Porter’s favour.

Wednesday afternoon was spent at a recording of Matt Forde’s Political Party Podcast, the guest in this edition was John Swinney.

Going to see Lucy Porter represented my first visit to visit Pleasance, my favourite Fringe venue.

I’m trying to avoid sounding like a pompous wanker who uses words like “Vibe”, but there is a great vibe about Pleasance.

I’d seen Lucy Porter before, on my first proper visit in 2009, and she was once again very funny, focusing on the, um, joys and agony of middle age.

Wednesday night was spent seeing Tape Face, formerly known as The Boy With Tape On His Face, who I had seen before.

As with the times before, I was crying with laughter, and even dancing to The Twist, like the rest of the audience.

Thursday morning was spent having a stroll along Leith Walk, checking out some of the Independent Shops, before going to see What Has The News Ever Done For Me?, this time making it to the right venue.

Thursday afternoon was spent at Paul Merton’s Impro Chums.

As the title suggests, you don’t quite know what is going to happen, and I don’t think anyone was expecting to be, um, treated to Merton taking his top off for their, um, pleasure.

On Thursday night, I went to see Brendon Burns. I only knew of him due to a video clip of him taking the piss out of Scousers.

He entered the stage ridiculously happy, as he had to cancel his previous shows due to Tonsillitis. He came in carrying an energy drink, who he approached to sponsor his podcast, but they declined due to suggested jingles.

He was rude, sweary, obnoxious and offensive. I loved every minute of it.

Friday morning was spent chilling at the BBC Base, now at George Heriot’s School having moved from Potterow. As there is now a building where their Potterow base was, it looks like they will be at George Heriot’s from now on.

There are usually free events and recordings taking place there, if you are stuck for something to do.

Even though I was heading home that night, there was still time for one last show, Super Sonic 90s Kid, a 90s nostalgiafest hosted by Sooz Kempner.

It had it’s moments, but not a lot of them. I would have been better signing off with Brendon Burns.

It was another trip to Edinburgh for me where I didn’t visit Arthur’s Seat. I promise i’ll try to trek up it in 2019.

Unless you go for the full month, you will always miss something you want to see. The night I left, Paloma Faith did a concert in Princes Street Gardens, which I would have loved to have gone to.

It wasn’t all perfect as the city suffered from overcrowding. In recent years it has been suggested to extend the dates of it, or to spread it around the city.

All the venues being so close to each other is why the event is so convenient. If it was spread out around the city, the problem is, Edinburgh doesn’t really have the public transport infrastructure to accommodate.

It doesn’t really help matters that people are thick as shit.

Remember when you started school? What was the first thing you learnt? Walk on the left, it’s surprisingly effective.

People seemed to be genuinely horrified that I was not prepared to walk on the road when cars were driving past just to accommodate them.

The problem was even worse during Commuter O’Clock when people were coming home from work.

Of the acts I didn’t see, it felt sacrilegious to go to Edinburgh and not see David O’Doherty. I had Kieran Hodgson on my To See List, but didn’t get a ticket. Judging by the reviews and the buzz around him, I really regretted it.

Despite his poster being plastered all over Edinburgh, it wasn’t until I read an interview with him in Metro that I realised he is Gordon from Two Doors Down.

If you haven’t seen Two Doors Down, you should get into it.

My return to Belfast didn’t see the end of the comedy, as I headed to The Odyssey to see The League Of Gentlemen. Every bit as good as the TV show, I was crying laughing at times.

So, that was Edinburgh over for me for another year. All being well, i’ll be back in 2019.

Edinblog 2017

Edinblog 2015

Edinblog 2014

Edinblog 2013

Edinblog 2012

Edinblog 2011

Edinblog 2010

EDINBLOG 2017

After a one year absence, I was back at the Edinburgh Festival.

I didn’t go last year as I went to the European Championship in France instead.

Not going to lie, August 2016 was unbearable, as I follow a lot of performers and venues on Social Media and all they did was post about Edinburgh. It was like hearing about a party you weren’t at.

I decided to go over for the opening weekend. There’s no bad time to go, it’s brilliant all month. From experience, the festival is at it’s best in the middle as you can find them just getting warmed up at the start and winding down at the end.

As I say, there is no bad time to go, and I began to count down from the moment I had the trip booked.

Part of the countdown is getting the programme and circling through it. Lots and lots of circling.

It’s not essential, but it does help if you plan what you want to see in advance. So, I created a database (stop laughing) and plotted my schedule of what I wanted to see.

However, I got lazy and forgot to book them in advance, so I would be gambling on purchasing them on my first day.

Thankfully, it wasn’t too bad. I got all I wanted, albeit having to rearrange the days I saw them to what was planned.

There was a mildly amusing (I’m downgrading it in order to manage expectations) moment when I asked the woman at the counter if Grainne Maguire’s free lunchtime show was ticketed and she replied “Grainne with a fada?”.

I thought her computer was case sensitive but it turned out she was asking if I was wanting to see Grainne Maguire’s other show she was doing.

I went to see What Has The News Ever Done For Me? hosted by Grainne Maguire, where a panel of comedians put forward a case as to why their light hearted news story of choice is the most important story in the world.

The show was ok, but I imagine it will get better throughout the month. What we did learn is that Maguire’s knowledge of Scottish politics is that Labour Leader Kezia Dugdale has a new girlfriend, with Maguire revealing that she once bought a dress because Dugdale wore it.

We also had people loitering outside, unsure if they wanted to see the show. They disappeared before the end of the show.

Despite a year away, I still hadn’t lost the knack of politely declining flyers and apologetically replying “I’m fine thanks”, a phrase I would say quite a lot over the weekend.

On my first day there, the weather didn’t disappoint. When I say it didn’t disappoint, I mean, I expected rain and got lots of it.

I went for a walk to Potterow where building work meant that the BBC’s location had been moved to nearby George Heriot’s School.

I only applied for one show, Steve Wright In The Afternoon on my first day there, and was unsuccessful.

While heading back from Potterow, The Scotsman were selling copies where you get a free goody bag. This include free sun cream …… as the rain continued to fall. Even the Newspaper Sellers in Edinburgh think they’re comedians.

As I headed into Edinburgh from the Airport, I browsed through the listings in Metro and saw an event which caught my eye called Fringe By The Sea, a counter event in North Berwick, a 30 minute train journey away.

KT Tunstall was playing on the Monday while I was there, but it was sold out.

Another concert I was unaware of until I arrived was Madness performing at Falkirk Stadium on the first day I arrived. Falkirk is only 30 minutes from Edinburgh by train.

No point crying over what I missed out on.

On the Friday teatime I went to see What Bowie Did Next looking at what David Bowie did when he entered heaven.

It wasn’t awful, but it wasn’t something i’d preach about to others. There were some fluffed lines, but they weren’t disastrous due to some quick thinking and audience interaction, and we did get to see Jimi Hendrix as portrayed by Jim Broadbent.

Friday accidentally became a themed day of dead people as my next show starred Margaret Thatcher. Well, probably someone in costume as her.

Thatcher Queen Of Game Shows is the follow-up to Thatcher Queen Of Sho, where Maggie now hosts a Game Show where plebs battle it out for benefits.

As I queued outside, Thatcher came out to inform the crowd that the show was delayed due to technical issues, blaming them on Theresa May.

She even apologised for the delay. That was very uncharacteristic for her. She didn’t apologise for the rain though.

The show pitted Skivers against Strivers. I was sat in the Skivers section, as we were treated to Angela Merkel rapping and Nicola Sturgeon in puppet form. Seriously, go see it.

Saturday morning was spent visiting Grassmarket and walking around the general Princes Street area, before catching some football as Edinburgh City took on Montrose,

By Saturday teatime, Edinburgh was now bathed in sunshine and that free sun cream was coming in handy, as I headed to Pleasance to see Matt Forde with a show titled that it was hastily rewritten.

He covers Politics and, i’m not sure if you’ve noticed recently, but Politics is fucked up these days.

You don’t have to be into Politics to enjoy the show, as he talks about loving the way Paul Nuttall says “Fisheries” and not much else about him.

Sunday morning was spent looking for bargains in the charity shops near Potterow and visiting Royal Mile Market as Edinburgh got treated to more rain.

By this point, The Scotsman were now giving out ponchos to anyone who bought it.

I’d left a gap on Monday for KT Tunstall, but i’d resigned myself to not going, so I set about getting tickets for Monday.

I purchased one for The Damned United. I’d hoped to see James Acaster but he was sold out, so Monday night was still free.

On Sunday teatime I went to see a show called Ringo starring Alexander Fox, about his obsession with Ringo Starr.

His accent when impersonating Starr sounded a bit Yorkshire, but a quick audio montage during the show revealed that Ringo’s accent goes all over the place.

Fox stated that he couldn’t afford an agent of flyers as he spent all his budget on a drum kit to perform on stage during the show.

However, I saw Flyerers for his show on the Monday, so he must have had a good weekend.

On the Sunday evening, I went to see Whose Line Is It Anyway? which was worth it to see Phill Jupitus do Bollywood.

I toyed with the idea of getting up early on Monday to walk Arthur’s Seat, but slept in. Try again in 2018.

I walked around Edinburgh on Monday morning, really realising how much I miss going to MacAulay and Co on weekday mornings, with the show having been cancelled by BBC Scotland in 2015.

So, what to do on Monday night?

Monday lunchtime was a free show called Circled In the Radio Times by John Osborne about inheriting his Grandad’s old editions of Radio Times and being able to pinpoint the exact moment he stopped watching Eastenders. It involved a Mitchell family feud.

Monday teatime was spent watching a stage version of The Damned United.

We even got a programme. Well, a sheet listing the cast, but i’m counting it as a programme.

It was very sweary, with some of Brian Clough’s mannerisms being spot on.

I wouldn’t say it’s the best play about Brian Cough at this year’s Fringe, but it’s in the top one.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t run for 44 days.

Warning, it’s very sweary.

Monday night was spent seeing Fred MacAulay at The Stand.

I’ve been a fan for a while but never got round to seeing as I usually went to his BBC show for free so didn’t feel the need to.

He observed his level of fame as being people know his name but don’t know his name and shared his fear that he might be related to Donald Trump.

So, that was it, my Edinburgh was over for another year and I flew back to Belfast on Tuesday morning.

One downside is that when you go, there will be some acts you miss. Here are some i’d suggest if you are heading over that I would have loved to have seen but they weren’t on when I was there :

Fred MacAulay In Conversation

Iain Connell

Limmy

Live At The Pleasance

Mark Watson

In Conversation With Amy MacDonald

Mr Laurel and Mr Hardy

So that is me, until August 2018 when it will be uphill walks, apologising to flyerers, rain, and most importantly, a good time.

Edinblog 2015

Edinblog 2014

Edinblog 2013

Edinblog 2012

Edinblog 2011

Edinblog 2010

2015 IN PICTURES – OCTOBER

October began for me with a trip to Solitude, to see Linfield and Cliftonville play out an entertaining 3-3 draw, as uncertainty reigned about the future of Linfield manager Warren Feeney.

The following week was very busy, beginning with Weird Al Yankovic at The Limelight.

The next night, it was Windsor Park to see Northern Ireland take on Greece knowing that a win would take them to Euro 2016. They got that win, and a party soon followed.

Back to The Limelight 24 hours later, for Cast.

And from music, back to football, to see Linfield take on Glentoran, with Warren Feeney gone and Andy Todd in temporary charge.

Later in the month, work took me to Stroke City. On my lunch, I spotted some Street Art, so I naturally headed out to get some snaps.

Back to football, it it was to Warrenpoint, as Linfield had their 3rd manager of the month, with David Healy now in permanent charge having his first game in charge.

I went back on the trail of Street Art, this time in Belfast. mopping up some pieces I missed on Culture Night the previous night.

The month ended with two football matches, to see Linfield taking on Carrick and Dungannon.

Cliftonville v Linfield

Weird Al Yankovic Live At The Limelight

Weird Al Yankovic Live At The Limelight Photo Album

Northern Ireland v Greece

Northern Ireland v Greece Photo Album

Cast Live At The Limelight

Cast Live At The Limelight Photo Album

Linfield v Glentoran

Stroke City Street Art

Stroke City Street Art Photo Album

Warrenpoint Town v Linfield

North Street Art October 2015

Linfield v Carrick Rangers

Dungannon Swifts v Linfield

WEIRD AL YANKOVIC – LIVE AT THE LIMELIGHT 7.10.2015

There are some concerts that, as soon as they are announced, you have to just stop everything to make sure you get a ticket. This was one such concert.

For me, like many others in the venue, it was an opportunity to see Weird Al Yankovic live in the flash.

I had been hoping he would be a residency at the Edinburgh Festival one year, I never thought he would venture to Belfast.

There was a Dublin concert announced. I decided to hold out and hope for a Belfast gig. My prayers were answered.

This concert was announced in mid February. It had been a long seven and a half month wait for this night.

As fans waited for him to appear on stage, a fire door was opened in the venue, prompting speculation of a grand entrance. Or maybe people were reading too much into it? Sometimes, a fire door would be opened to let a bit of fresh air in, or to let a member of the road crew in or out.

His band appeared on stage but Al was nowhere to be seen. Eventually, he appeared on the LED screen in the background, standing in a street. On closer inspection, that street looked familiar, it was Linenhall Street, just around the corner from The Limelight.

He then casually walked into the venue from the street nearby singing Tacky, his parody of Happy by Pharrell Williams, embracing all forms of tackiness.

Who is Weird Al Yankovic? You need to be told?

Simple really, he’s a singer, but he does comedy versions of songs that are in the charts. It’s often said that you haven’t made it until Weird Al Yankovic parodies you.

He also does Accordion driven hits medleys, known as Polka …….. with a varying suffix.

He lifted his Accordion in the air, like a weapon, the crowd screamed “POLKA!!! POLKA!!!”, he simply replied by saying “How did you read my mind?” before doing a medley of hits from 2014.

There were quite a lot of costume changes inbetween songs, there had to be, it wouldn’t have worked if he wasn’t in character when doing his parodies. The LED screen on stage filled the time with a compilation of his appearances in TV shows and movies (Guest appearances in The Simpsons and The Naked Gun are on his CV, though is Simpsons appearance wasn’t shown) and sketches.

He didn’t need to win over the crowd, he was preaching to the converted. They knew the words to every song and sketch.

His new hits were prominent, Word Crimes (Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke), Handy (Fancy by Iggy Azaela) and Foil (Royals by Lorde) as were his classics, the biggest cheer came for his food related Michael Jackson parodies, Fat and Eat It.

All his biggies were there, parodying Nirvana, Lady Gaga, Joan Jett, Queen, Backstreet Boys, Devo, Green Day, Madonna, Billy Joel, Coolio and Chamillionaire.

The crowd were loving it as Al shouts “DO YOU WANT SOME MORE?” and is met with a reply of “YES!!!!” before replying that he can’t because of a host of logistical reasons, before leaving the stage.

He was only winding them up, as he came back on for an encore, dressed in Star Wars cosplay and joined on stage by dancers dressed up as Darth Vader and Star Wars, performing The Saga Begins, a synopsis of Star Wars set to the tune of American Pie.

Photo Album

EDINBLOG 2014

A few weeks back, I headed to Edinburgh to take in the Fringe Festival. It was the 6th successive year i’ve attended it. Not going to lie, I love this event, that’s why I keep coming back.

Usually, I arrive in the city on a Saturday, but this year I made it a Thursday to Monday trip. I’d consider myself to be an Edinburgh Veteran, so the trip began in usual fashion – an early morning flight, then a trip to the Ticket Office.

It’s a bit of a risk to wait until arrival to buy tickets, as a lot of shows sell out quickly, I usually find it easy enough to get a good schedule.

It might sound sad, but I plan what I want to see, and have back-up options, just in case.

I didn’t get some of my first choice options, so I had to switch some of my schedule around to accommodate other nights which had tickets available.

I decided to keep some windows open in order to wait and see what to get to fill those gaps, later in the trip.

The first thing you notice when you arrive in Edinburgh ………. they have Trams!!!!

It’s a sad development for the world of comedy, as in previous years, comedians weren’t slow in putting a gag or reference to the much delayed tram line.

As a result of delays getting my baggage, I missed out on being in the audience of MacAulay and Co, which I had a ticket for that morning. Frustratingly, David O’Doherty was a guest that day.

I try to get a mixture of people i’d seen before, and people I haven’t seen. David O’Doherty is one I have to see everytime i’m in Edinburgh. I tried to get tickets for his show but it was sold out, which made it even more frustrating.

I’d planned to see my first show that afternoon, a musical of the movie Ghostbusters, but I got lost trying to find the venue (yes, even Edinburgh Veterans get lost sometimes) and missed it.

Later that evening, I went to my first show of the Fringe – Tedfest, a show based on the Festival/Fan Convention of the TV show Father Ted.

It had a World Cup style comedian battle, a talent show, and of course, a (mock) Lovely Girls Competition. It had it’s moments, most notably when the compere asked people to stand for the national anthem, and “Ghost Town” by The Specials was played, but overall, it just wasn’t that funny.

Friday began with MacAulay and Co, always a pleasure, with guests that day including Alun Cochrane and Tom Rosenthal.

On Friday afternoon, I went to see a show called The 56, a show about the Bradford Fire in 1985.

There was no plot, just three actors reading and acting out real life testimonies of people who survived the fire. It was well acted, to the point where it felt like a hard watch at times.

I got lucky with my dates, that Paul Merton was performing when I was there. Paul Merton only does a few dates in Edinburgh each year, and some years i’ve missed out on seeing him because the dates didn’t match.

The show, Paul Merton’s Impro Chums, sees him, and collaborators, including his wife, performing Improvised Comedy.

That evening, I went to see Frisky and Mannish. I’d had them recommended to me in previous years, and finally decided to go and see them in 2013 …… except, they didn’t have a show that year.

Their show this year, was a musical comedy looking at popculture and it’s best meltdowns, and how they struggled to come up with an appropriate anthem for feminism. They were very funny, especially when they sang all of Sinead O’Connor’s unpublished open letters to various pop stars.

My next show on Friday was Margaret Thatcher : Queen Of Soho, a musical comedy about how Margaret Thatcher became the Queen of Soho.

Margaret Thatcher is the lead character, telling her story, in a laugh a minute show, which isn’t afraid to make fun of her, as she offers a bottle of milk to an audience member, and gets into an arguement with fellow cast members, and tells them “I won’t hesitate about making people unemployed”

When asked by one of her staff is she should screw over the Lib Dems, she simply replies “No, we might need them some day”

There is also a talking picture of Winston Churchill.

From there, I headed to the Comedywealth Games, presented by Mark Watson. I’d wanted to see Mark Watson’s show, so this was the next best thing.

Comedywealth Games was, unsurprisingly, a comedy version of the Commonwealth Games, where comedians competed against each other in a range of events, none of which were athletic based, including sock pairing, eating fruit on a treadmill, and a sack race.

The night I went had Mark Steel representing England. Romesh Ranganathan was due to represent Sri Lanka, so Mark Steel’s son Elliott took his place. It was the day before his 18th birthday. As the show began after 11, he celebrated his birthday midway through the show.

The final competitor was Andrew Maxwell, from the Republic of Ireland.. As Republic Of Ireland is not a member of the Commonwealth, a draw was made to assign him a country. He was assigned Kiribati.

After spending some time on Wikipedia before the show Andrew Maxwell was now a patriotic Kiribatian.

Star of the show, was an audience member called Darren, who was picked to assist the competitors. He was “slightly worse for wear” and spent most of his time swearing and making rude gestures.

The crowd loved him, and chanted his name everytime Mark Watson asked for a member of the crowd to assist.

For the record, England and Kiribati were level on the medals table, with England winning 2-1 on a Rock/Sissors/Paper Play-Off.

The first part of Saturday was mostly football dominated, having a pub lunch to watch Man United v Swansea, then to see Sid Lowe do a talk about his book, Fear And Loathing In La Liga, a look at the rivalry between Barcelona and Real Madrid.

That evening, I went to see Axis Of Awesome. I’d previously had them recommended to me. It was a musical comedy, very much in the style of Flight Of The Conchords, with each member taking it in turns to be the butt of the others jokes.

The highlight of the show was when they performed “4 Chords“, a series of pop classics to the tune of “Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey, showing how so many songs use the same 4 chords.

I had an unexpected bonus on the Saturday night, as David O’Doherty performed an extra show at 11pm, due to demand. It was classic O’Doherty, with his surreal sense of humour having the crowd in stitches.

Sunday afternoon was spent at Tynecastle watching Hearts v Hibs. From there, I had a very long walk to see John Lloyd’s Museum Of Curiosity, a very QI type show, unsurprisingly, considering that John Lloyd was the creator of QI.

My final show, came on the Sunday night, called “What Does The Title Matter Anyway?”, though it was listed in the festival programme (published in early June) as “Whose Live Show Is It Anyway?, which sounds a bit like “Whose Line Is It Anyway?”

It was hosted by Clive Anderson, who hosted Whose Line Is It Anyway? and featured Whose Line ….. regulars such as Greg Proops and Stephen Frost.

Anderson, a former lawyer, was quick to point out that this show was totally different from Whose Line Is It Anyway? I feel it’s only fair to repeat what he said.

Whatever the legalities, the audience didn’t care about that, they were only there for laughs, which they got, from the mapcap and surreal situations the show provided. It was a good way to end Edinburgh 2014.

I always keep meaning to explore Scotland when i’m there, possibly taking a day trip to Glasgow or Stirling. But there’s so much going on in Edinburgh, it seems a shame to leave the city while you’re there, even for a day.

Edinblog 2013

Edinblog 2012

Edinblog 2011

Edinblog 2010

Edinblog 2009

THE FATHER TED FIVE : 5. SPEED 3

Today’s newspapers are full of The Pope’s resignation. On this day 15 years ago, attention was focused on another departing (fictional) Priest, but from this mortal coil, as Dermot Morgan, star of Father Ted, sadly died on February 28th 1998.

Instead of mourning, let’s celebrate the greatness of Father Ted by looking back at his five greatest moments in a five part series.

5. SPEED 3

This episode begins with a classic Ted joke, where you can see the punchline, but get sent in the wrong direction as to who the victim of the punchline is, as an angry Ted storms in, covered in sick, angry at Dougal for playing with excitable babies.

Just when you think that the Babies have been sick all over Ted, it turns out that it was the childlike Dougal who was the one who had puked all over Ted.

The star of this episode is Pat Mustard, a sex crazed Milkman who Ted takes an instant dislike to. Having noticed an unusual amount of hairy babies (a great example of the surreal humour used in the show), Ted suspects that Pat Mustard has been fathering illegitimate children.

One of the great aspects of the show was Ted’s competitive streak, usually brought out by Dick Byrne, a rival priest on a nearby island, with a parallel set-up (old drunk priest, young idiot priest, middle aged priest)

Ted and Dougal go out to gain evidence on Mustard’s extra curricular activities, which they do, resulting in Mustard getting sacked.

Funny so far, but just wait for the, quite literally, explosive punchline.

With no Milkman to serve the island, the childlike Dougal volunteers himself for the role, with the head of distribution happy to accommodate this due to Dougal being “A man of God”, which he needs to have explained to him.

The best bit about it was Ted’s send-off to Dougal, like a proud parent sending a child to school.

Dougal running a milkfloat ended up having hilarious consequences, but it wasn’t Dougal’s fault. It would have been too easy for it to be his fault.

Dougal became the victim of a revenge attack, with a bomb on the milkfloat activated when he goes above 4mph, to go off when he drops below 4mph, a parody of the 90s film series Speed, which had two films in the 90s (The episode was a joke that this would be the 3rd Speed movie)

What comes is a perfect example of Father Ted’s humour – slapstick, surreal, and never afraid to make fun of popular culture. Ted enlists the help of two other Priests, one of whom wants to use the situation to say Mass.

The answer, literally, hits Ted, as Jack hits Ted with a brick, which inspires Ted to put the brick on the accelerator, to allow Dougal to escape.

Pat Mustard may have been the star, but Dougal has the last word. On his milkround, a woman turned up at the door naked in anticipation of Pat Mustard, only to see Dougal.

Later on, Dougal screams out “Ted!! Those women were in the nip”

Slow, Naive, and Endeeringly funny. Dougal Maguire summed in in a sentence.

EDINBLOG 2012

For the 4th successive year, I headed to Edinburgh for the Festival. After booking it, I did start to have second thoughts, mainly because I was worried about repitition. How wrong I was.

I flew out at 7am on the Saturday morning, which always sounds like a good idea when you book it. What this ridiculously early arrival did mean was, that I could get a prime position at the Ticket Office when it opened at 10am.

Last year, I managed to get everything I wanted. This year, I had some disappointments, as i’d hoped to see John Peel’s Shed, Adam Hills and Marcus Brigstoke, but they were all sold out unfortunately.

My first show that I saw was that afternoon, ‘The Boss Rules’ by Sarfraz Manzoor talking about his Bruce Springsteen obsession, and how the lyrics to Springsteen songs can offer guidance to any situation in life.

Not a comedian, Manzoor did have some comic gems, recalling his musical tastes pre Springsteen growing up in Luton, joking that he naively thought people were sharing his love of AOR by shouting “FOREIGNER!!!!!” at him.

He jokes about the negative images of his hometown, as the origin of the EDL, that their leader is so racist, he runs a Tanning Salon, the only place where you will never see a Black or Asian person.

He speaks passionately of his Springsteen obsession, thinking nothing of travelling across the world, even to the point that Springsteen spots him in the crowd at Pittsburgh and asks “What are you doing here?”

Having recently become a father and this change has meant a lot of financial sacrifices, with his own brand of Brucanomics, ruefully observation that the money he spent on a highchair could have got him flights to Mainland Europe or Scandinavia to see Springsteen in concert.

Overall, it was a very good show, and you don’t need to be a Springsteen fan to get the gags.

Next show that I saw was Mark Watson. He was on my reserve list but his show was excellent. You may recognise him from the Panel Show circuit and he has the same bumbling demeanor as his TV appearances.

The show is called ‘The Information’ and focuses on interaction and information organisations have of us. He began by recalling a story of how he overheard two audience members having an argument, that one didn’t want to go so her boyfriend said that they could leave at the interval and got to Nandos.

That was his competition, chicken …….. and not even a high quality of chicken.

It just so happened that they were in the front row, and he used this information against them. You never quite know what direction he is going in when he performs, which is no bad thing.

That night, I went to see The Boy With Tape On His Face, which was originally on my reserve list. It turns out missing the shows I wanted was a blessing in disguise, he was fantastic.

As the name suggests, he has a tape on his face. He doesn’t say anything, it’s all physical comedy (often using his emotions to signal approval or disapproval), using audience members, props and musical assistance.

The first observation, was that he stood on stage as the audience entered the arena, eyeing them up for possible participants.

Best moments were when he had a stapler shoot-out with an audience member with a balloon under each arm and one inbetween the legs, and using a tape measure as a light sabre to recreate Star Wars.

The following day, I went to see Hibs play Hearts. Go on, joke about me going to see an SPL game during the middle of a comedy festival.

A blog about the match can be found a few posts back.

From there, I was Pleasance (My favourite venue. One year, I will spend a whole day there) bound for One Rogue Reporter by Rich Peppiatt

Rich Peppiatt always wanted to be a journalist, but not for the reasons most people want to be a journalist. It was the long hours and low pay which appealed to him, as it was a proud Peppiatt tradition to do jobs that they hate.

In his words “It was one low point after another”

Peppiatt is probably best known for leaking his resignation letter when leaving Daily Star.

The show’s title, in his words “Is stolen, in fine tabloid tradition”

It comes from the Leveson Inquiry, which provides a lot of material for the show.

Peppiatt weaves between speaking and introducing video clips. The clips were often Brass Eye-esque surrealism, poking fun at senior media figures.

Daily Express editor Hugh Whittow stated at Leveson that somebody should have intervened regarding a series of stories about Madeline McCann.

So, Peppiatt blutacs a series of print-outs of these stories onto Whittow’s car, and when challenged, nonchalantly replies “You should have intervened”

The highlight is his stitch-up of Kelvin McKenzie. I won’t spoil it in case you haven’t seen it, but it is worth the admission fee alone.

That night, I went to see Jim Jefferies, an Australian comic, not the former Hearts manager.

I didn’t know much about him, but he did have some brilliant reviews, so I took a chance. Laugh a minute stuff, but not for the easily offended.

A routine where he dreams of being widowed purely to get sympathy shags off women sets the tone for the rest of the show.

My final show on the Sunday Night was a show called ‘Guardian Reader’ …… it was utter wank.

I’d thought it might be good as a witty analysis of lazy stereotypes and cliches, it barely referenced The Guardian. It was just a rollcall of crap jokes and anecdotes about the performer’s failed teaching career.

All his ‘jokes’ were read off a page, and he even laughed at his own jokes.

I made my excuses and left after ten minutes. Not sure if the other 12 people in the room stuck it out.

Many performers took Monday 13th off, making it problematic for shows, as it was mostly acts I wanted to see.

That afternoon, I went to see ‘My Stepson Stole My Sonic Screwdriver‘ by Toby Hadoke, about a Doctor Who obsessive learning to bond with his deaf stepson through the medium of Doctor Who.

His fame as a Doctor Who obsessive saw him appear at a fan convention on February 14th this year, which he joked was a good date to hold a Doctor Who convention as “Doctor Who fans don’t usually have plans on Valentine’s Night”

Even though he’s a Doctor Who obsessive, he gets annoyed at people who automatically think he’s likes Star Wars, angrily stating “I’m not a geek” and thanking Doctor Who for scaring his kids, meaning he hasn’t needed a babysitter since March 2005.

Having a deaf stepchild, he has learnt sign language, and even created Doctor Who related sign language terms.

He describes watching Doctor Who with subtitles, that the opening credits simply says *DOCTOR WHO THEME* and expressing his sadness that he will never hear such an iconic TV theme tune, even if he watched every episode of Doctor Who, the room fell silent.

That silence was soon turned into laughter with the punchline “which he will do, because I have an week long Whoathon planned for his next birthday”

From there, I went to see ‘Man 1 Bank 0‘, a true story about a man who jokingly deposited a junk mail cheque, which amazingly cleared.

1-0 is of course a football score, a hard fought victory. To use a football analogy, this was an FA Cup giantkilling as the story went from end to end before it’s star, Patrick Combs, eventually was victorious, and $93,000 richer.

That night, I saw Rhys Darby live.

Best known as Murray Hewitt from Flight Of The Conchords, he’s not afraid of typecasting, arring on stage in a spacesuit, where a robot voice welcomes him, he asks “Is that you Jermaine?” (in reference to his FOTC co-star Jermaine Clement)

This robot is called Al, which he explains by singing “You Can Call Me Al” much to Darby’s annoyance

In the show, Darby reminisces about his schoolkids, when he and his friends were known as the “Dicks Club”, so they claimed it for themselves.

The finale involves him dancing to ‘Rhythm Is A Dancer’, which he renames “Rhysie Is A Dancer’

Monday night should have been renamed New Zealand Night, as I went to see Jarred Christmas afterwards.

He was funny throughout, and like Darby, spent a lot of his show dancing. Must be a New Zealand thing.

The BBC broadcast shows at the festival, and I was lucky enough to get tickets for MacAulay and Co on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, where Jarred Christmas was a guest (twice in 12 hours) and Des Bishop proved that anyone can have a hip-hop hit by sampling an already popular song, and showed by doing a rap about stalking an ex on Facebook and sampling ‘Someone Like You’ by Adele for the chorus.

After that, I was in the audience for Festival Cafe, where Schlomo was a guest.

My first proper show on Tuesday was a show called ‘Superheroes’, which I thought might be a funny look at comicbook superheroes. It wasn’t. It was a man who should be old enough to know better playing with toys and shouting a lot.

I managed to sneak out after fifteen minutes. The other nine people in the audience were not so lucky.

From there, I went to see Jimeoin at the EICC, which is the Wembley of the Edinburgh Fringe

To be honest, the show was disappointing. It was funny in parts, but not riproaring.

Next up was David O’Doherty at Pleasance. There is a 30-40 minute walk from EICC to Pleasance, my best bet was a taxi. I’d been quoted fifteen quid for a Pedicab, but I knew I was being ripped-off as I travelled a similar distance on Sunday for just under a fiver.

I started walking in the hope of hailing a cab.

As a cab drove past me, I saw it picking up fellow hailers ten seconds in front of me. I chanced and ask where they were heading, they replied Pleasance. Result, got a cabshare. It came to £5.90, so I gave £3 (I felt duty bound to contribue 52-53%)

If Edinburgh Festival is the Olympics of comedy, David O’Doherty is Usain Bolt in the 100m. He’s just as quickfire and madcap.

He bemoaned going to an all boys school and the concept of single sex schooling, pointing out “What’s the point in getting a C in Home Economics is half the world’s population are like aliens to me?”

The master of improvisation, he sang out tips from a Cosmopolitan Sex Guide based on numbers shouted out by members of the audience.

Wednesday’s MacAulay and Co was fantastic, guest Neil Delamere pointing out that Holland’s Olympic team would get a lot of support in Glasgow as they wear tracksuits with ‘NED’ written on it.

Sammy J and Randy were a guest on it. I’d always been thinking of seeing them in Edinburgh. I’ll defiantely do it in 2013.

On Wednesday night I went to see Scotland v Australia. A blog about this is a few posts back.

On Thursday afternoon, I saw Paul Merton’s Impro Chums, as the title suggests, Paul Merton doing improvised comedy with a support cast. I’d seen the show in 2009 and it was fantastic then, and fantastic again in 2012.

And this, Edinburgh 2012 was over for me.

TOP FIVE

1. The Boy With Tape On His Face
2. Man 1 Bank 0
3. David O’Doherty
4. My Stepson Stole My Sonic Screwdriver
5. One Rogue Reporter

WORTHY MENTIONS

Michael Winslow – Best known as Larvell (or, the voice guy) from Police Academy, I saw him last year and he was fantastic.

David Hasselhoff – He wasn’t on while I was here. He has a talking car and invented Baywatch, as if you need an excuse to see him.

The Boat Factory – Friends of mine worked when this toured schools, so there’s a bit of bias with this choice. A two man play set in H and W starring Dan ‘Red Hand Luke’ Gordon.

Edinblog 2011

Edinblog 2010

Edinblog 2009

EDINBLOG 2011

If it’s August, then it must be Edinburgh.

As is now annual, I headed to Edinburgh for the festival recently. Having taken in the last week (2009) and the first week (2010), I decided to take the middle week, and it turned out to be an inspired choice.

Instead of the festival just getting started or winding down, it was in the full swing of things when I arrived.

If I could afford to stay in Edinburgh for the whole month. I would.

I flew in on an early morning flight on Saturday 13th. So early in fact, I managed to be at the ticket office before it’s 10am opening time.

Pleasantly, I was surprised to have been able to get tickets for all the events I wanted tickets for, without resorting to second choices.

Like the previous two years, I was sad enough to make a timetable of what I wanted to see, and it helped me plan my time in the city.

It was time to leave the culture to one side as I headed to Tynecastle for Hearts v Aberdeen. A blog of the match can be found here.

That night, I saw Ed Byrne at the EICC, and he was very funny, even if he did rehash a couple of jokes from Mock the Week, giving his views on immigration, pointing out the irony of Irish people complaining about immigration and stating he has no problem with the number of Eastern Europeans living in Dublin ……… except for the fact they work as doormen and don’t watch Mock The Week, meaning he can’t pull the “Do you know who I am?” line.

After a nice relaxing sleep, I headed to see some free shows on the Sunday afternoon.

One which caught my attention in the programme was Him and Me TV which turned out to be an inspired choice, as it was laugh a minute stuff.

It was a live sketch show poking fun at television and popculture, much in the style of The Kevin Bishop Show, but if the exception that it was brilliantly executed, such as the sketch of a superhero called “Councilman”, a masked vigilante who fixes road and infrastructure, that the local council won’t, and the continuity announcement of an upcoming movie premiere of Batman Biggins, a superhero epic starring Christopher Biggins.

The next show I saw was “Ze Hoff Und Friends”, which to be honest, was dreadful.

Yes, the Germans love David Hasselhoff and yes, they speak in what appears to be funny foreign accents, but it’s hard to do a show about such a thing.

Later that night, I saw David O’Doherty who I saw in 2010, and he was as madcap and erratic as ever, a must see.

Following on from his facts about Panda Bears, he moves on to facts about Sharks, pointing out that 9 out of 10 shark related injuries happen at sea, clarifying that the remaining 10% include incidents such as people falling out of bed after a shark related nightmare, or stufed sharks in museums/aquariums falling from where they are displayed an injuring people.

From there, I headed to EICC to see Jason Byrne who was one of the star turns in 2009.

He didn’t do the joke about how he injured his knee while doing a poo (Youtube it) but still managed to entertain in the most novel of ways, most notably, how many audience members can they fit into a pair of spanx.

The first act I saw on Monday was the one i’d been waiting for the most – Michael Winslow

If you don’t know who he is, he’s the voice effects guy from Police Academy, taking his live show to Edinburgh for the first time.

He enters the arena with a great opening line, informing the audience that it is a crime to impersonate the PA system on an airplane, a fact he found out the hard way, and then saying he is banned from every Tesco and Sainsbury in Scotland for the same reason.

A fantastic show well worth seeing if you get the chance, Winslow managed to interact with the audience, pointing the spotlight on people leaving to go to the toilet while doing comedy sound effects to their footsteps.

And yes, he even did his much famed Jimi Hendrix tribute.

The next show I saw was by Jason John Whitehead , title “Letters From Mindy”, going through the story of a break-up, but, as he entered the stage holding cue cards for the audience to see, it wasn’t the story of a breakdown, it was a breakdown of a breakdown.

I’d previously seen him before, and this was a darker show by comparison, but there was still heartwarming moments as he spoke about his companionship with his dog, a relationship where he forgives his dog for pooing in the kitchen, something he wouldn’t do for his human friends.

Unfortunately, on the Tuesday, I managed to sleep in and miss MacAulay and Co which I had tickets for.

At teatime, I went to see Isy Suttie, best known as Dobby in Peep Show, for a musical tale of a holiday romance brought back to life later in life via the internet.

That night I went to see Neil Delamere, who i’d seen before in Edinburgh. The master of the quick witted banter, he managed to tease and taunt his audience in equal measure.

When someone in the front row returned, he told them not to worry as they hadn’t missed anything, apart from him getting Madeline McCann on stage to perform a dance, to which an audience member groans “Too soon”

It was one of those types of shows.

I then went to see Rich Hall who was typical Rich Hall, ranting away at all the things he hates about America, complete with all the things he likes about Scotland, before bemoaning the fact that he couldn’t think of a good way to end the show, and that he should have possibly ended when there was racaous laughter at a joke he did five minutes earlier.

On Wednesday, I saw Rosie Wilby in a show called “Rosie’s Pop Diary” recalling her days as columnist at a magazine called Making Music, whilst persuing her dreams of music stardom.

It wasn’t laugh a minute, but there were still some enjoyable moments.

Next up, was Seann Walsh, currently being seen on 8 Out Of 10 Cats.

The show seemed to struggle at times as he had nobody to bounce banter with, as came be the case when panel show regulars do their own shows.

However, the magic moment of the show came when an audience member left to go to the toilet. In such an intimate setting, it’s hard to escape unnoticed.

If there’s a moral to the story, it’s to never leave during the middle of a show to go to the toilet.

Walsh hatched a plan where the girls friends would swap with another group.

There was another woman also going top the toilet, so Walsh sat in her seat, talking to her friend in a Kilroy style whilst waiting for the other woman to walk in, only to find someone else sitting in her seat, and her friends nowhere to be seen.

It was a prank that Jeremy Beadle would have been proud of.

Later that night, I saw my favourite show of the festival, by Angelos Epithemiou, star of Shooting Stars, wheeling out his segments into a laugh a minute, hour long show.

The show began on a travel theme, explaining that he’d come back from Afghanistan, entertaining the troops, and that The Taliban were a hard audience to please.

He also spoke that he was heading to the North-East after Edinburgh, and hoping it was nothing like the Middle-East.

His trusty keyboard was there, as his keyboard went on a blue theme, playing sex noises, before accidentally hitting the wrong note, when a monotone American voice says “Dictionary”

What was in his bag? A blind man’s walking stick, which Epithemiou boasted the victim he stole it from never saw it coming.

On the Thursday morning, I managed to see MacAulay and Co, where guests included Michael Winslow and Jimeoin, whose Northern Ireland accent was mocked by Winslow, which made me smile that one of the voices of “The Man Of 10,000 Voices” was North Coast accent.

That night, I went to Tynecastle to see Hearts take on Spurs, and thus, my Edinburgh adventure was over for another year.

Already counting down to August 2012.

Edinblog 2010

Edinblog 2009

THE EDINBURGH CELEB SPOTTING BLOG

Edinburgh in August is a celeb spot goldmine, so behold the list of moderately known comedians and panel show contributors.

Monday 15th August

Richard Herring, walking along Cowgate
Tim Key, in Assembly
Michael Winslow, walking along Candlemaker Row

Tuesday 16th August

Jenny Eclair, outside Pleasance

Wednesday 17th August

Tim Vine, sipping a beer in Pleasance Courtyard

Thursday 18th August

Al Murray, walking past Potterow

And as a bonus, Sky Sports News reporter Dharmesh Sheth was behind me in the queue to go through security at Gatwick Airport on Monday night.

EDINBLOG PREVIEW

In just under three weeks, i’ll be making my annual trip to Edinburgh to take in the Fringe Festival.

Since the programme was released, i’ve been circling and scribbling notes, trying to decide what I want to see, a process I may finally have mastered.

As with my previous two visits, once I drop my belongings at the hotel, i’m heading straight for the ticket office to get tickets for the shows i’m wanting to see.

I arrive on the morning of Saturday 13th. Feel free to label me as brave or stupid for flying on the 13th. At least it’s not a Friday.

I should be there in plenty of time, and I know the route to Tynecastle, so planning to take in Hearts v Aberdeen that day.

I took in football at Tynecastle and Easter Road when in Edinburgh in 2009, plus I get to add 1983 European Cup Winners Cup Winners Aberdeeen to my UEFA 100 Club list.

That night, i’m planning to see Fred MacAulay with Ed Byrne as my back-up option, and then possibly Tim Key, depending how tired I am.

The programme for the event gives performers a brief showcase of their work, which can often make or break them in the eyes of tourists.

Him and Me TV” and “Ze Hoff Und Friends” both have good write-ups, plus they’re free, so if they’re crap, it’s no loss.

The main one I hope to see on the Sunday evening is David O’Doherty. I saw him in 2010 and he was fantastic, laugh a minute.

Im also hoping to see Jason Byrne, having seen him in 2009, again, laugh a minute stuff, especially the sketch about how he wrecked his knee ligaments.

Each morning, MacAulay and Co, a BBC Scotland show hosted by Fred MacAulay will be broadcasting from the festival, so i’m hoping to attend as many of these as possible.

For the Monday night, i’m hoping to see Michael Winslow. Winslow, along with David O’Doherty are the two performers I desperately want to see.

You may not immediately recognise the name,but you will recognise th voice, or should that be voices, having gained fame playing Larvell Jones in Police Adademy.

For Tuesday, i’m hoping to see Isy Suttie, best known as Dobby from Peep Show, mainly because (a) I love Dobby (b) I love Dobby (c) I love Dobby …….. and so forth.

Later that night, i’m hoping to see Neil Delamere and Rich Hall, having seen both on the same night in 2009, and both were excellent (and were absent from the festival in 2010)

On the Wednesday, i’m hoping to see “Rosie’s Pop Diary” by Rosie Wilby and Seann Walsh, who you may recognise from the recent panel show circuit.

At some point on the Wednesday or Thursday, i’m hoping to see Angelos Epithemiou, star of Shooting Stars.

Nothing has been planned for the Thursday yet, mainly because I have to get up ridiculously early on the Friday morning for my flight to Gatwick, so i’m debating wether to go to bed early, or pull an all-nighter.

If Hearts are playing a UEFA Cup tie that night, I may go to Tynecastle for the second time of the week.

If not, i’ll be hoping to see some of the acts i’ve got highlighted and not yet seen such as Dave Gorman, Alun Cochrane, Jimeoin, Andrew Maxwell and Phill Jupitus.

If you’ve never been to the Edinburgh Festival, I can’t suggest it enough for you. If you are going to this year’s festival, I hope i’ve helped you decide who you are going to see.

Only another 20 days until I arrive.