MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 9.11.1985

MEXICO HERE WE COME!! screams the headline on the cover of Match, as Northern Ireland head to Wembley looking for the result that will take them to the 1986 World Cup Finals.

The match gets a double page spread as soon as you open the magazine, featuring interviews with David McCreery and Glenn Hoddle. McCreery is in bullish mood, saying Northern Ireland will win on merit and not need any favours from England.

Gary Lineker uses his column to reveal that Frank Worthington was his footballing hero.

Match follows the progress of a young player they’ve adopted, Lee Martin of Huddersfield Town, as he gets ready to face Liverpool in the FA Youth Cup.

This player in question was a goalkeeper, and not to be confused with the Lee Martin who scored the winner in the 1990 FA Cup Final Replay.

There are posters of Northern Ireland and Aberdeen. Aberdeen had just beaten Hibs 3-0 in the Scottish League Cup Final.

Staying in Scotland, there could be a TV blackout of Scottish football due to a lack of agreement with broadcasters STV and BBC Scotland.

Match does a feature called Stars In The Shade, profiling players watching England’s top flight from the sidelines such as Alan Brazil, Michael Robinson and Gary Mabbutt.

David Speedie gets asked about his favourite things, his favourite music being Spandau Ballet, Sade and Barbara Dickson.

Match uses the ratings in their results service to do a feature on the best goalkeepers in England’s top flight, with Ray Clemence coming out on top with an average rating of 7.53 from 13 games.

Ray Wilkins, based in Italy with AC Milan, uses his column to declare that Michael Laudrup will be one of the stars of the 1986 World Cup.

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ESPANA 82 – THE PLAYER’S SOUVENIR

A curious thing came into my possession this week, ironically, on 25th June (You should know why that date is important) of a booklet previewing the 1982 World Cup for Northern Ireland.

The front cover features match action from the 1-0 win over Israel in November 1981 that secured Northern Ireland’s qualification.

The brochure is edited by Billy Kennedy and Ivan Little, then Co-Editors of Linfield’s matchday programme, and also co-edited Northern Ireland’s programmes during that period. Billy Kennedy is still currently writing for the News Letter, while Ivan Little now has a weekly column for Sunday Life after a long career with UTV.

The editorial congratulates Northern Ireland on qualifying for the finals, pointing out that the groundwork to a successful campaign began in winning the 1980 Home Championship.

There is an editorial from Dr Michael Scott, Consultant Cardiologist at Belfast City Hospital, congratulating the team on it’s success, and pointing out the benefits of not smoking. There are various anti smoking adverts in the publication from NI Chest Heart Stroke Association.

Despite the title, the publication was available to the public at a cost of £1.20.

Malcolm Brodie writes about how the World Cup has changed during his time covering the event, especially since Northern Ireland’s last appearance, 24 years previously, in 1958.

He notes that the tournament is now more commercialised, in his words, “It is big business, now on a global scale”, and about how there will be increased security surrounding all the teams in Spain.

Brodie signs off with “Reaching the Quarter-Finals would be an unbelievable boost, and in the opinion of many, a miracle. Knowing Billy Bingham’s luck, that may be achieved. You never know, stranger things have happened”

There were no Quarter-Finals in Spain 82, after the groups, there were 4 groups of 3. Northern Ireland were 1 win away from the Semi-Finals, so technically, it was a Quarter-Final of sorts.

There was also a fixture list for the competition, with dates/venues/kick-off times.

What struck me as odd was the volume of group games being played at the same time. For example, Hungary v El Salvador in Group 3 was played at the same time as Scotland v New Zealand in Group 5.

Ironically, the final group games weren’t played simultaneously in Spain 82, though that would change as a result of the Austria v West Germany game.

Honduras and Yugoslavia, two of Northern Ireland’s group opponents get a double page spread. Not knowing much about the Hondurans, Northern Ireland are being helped by Terry Moore, a Canadian international who grew up in Northern Ireland, played for Glentoran, but in 1982, was playing for Tampa Bay Rowdies.

Honduras had beaten Canada for a place in the finals, with Moore bemoaning the fact that Honduras winner wasn’t disallowed for offside. Moore would get the chance to play for Canada in the 1986 World Cup.

Moore would point out that it would feel like an away game due to the Honduran population in Spain, and that they would get support from locals for their games against Yugoslavia and Northern Ireland.

Apart from Nikki Jovanovic, formerly of Manchester United, not much was known of Yugoslavia, though there was an admiration for their manager Milijan Milijanic, in his second spell as manager, after winning two La Liga titles with Real Madrid inbetween.

Bill Clark of Sunday Mirror pays tribute to the role played by two members of Billy Bingham’s backroom team, Martin Harvey and Bertie Peacock.

Some players are lucky enough to get full page profiles with the usual Q and A with footballers.

Sammy McIlroy was chosen by the UK government to front a “Behave yourselves” campaign (England and Scotland also qualified for Spain 82) but stated that Northern Ireland fans will behave, but that such a campaign was worthwhile. He also spoke about his transfer from Manchester United to Stoke City.

A former pupil of Mersey Street Primary School, his favourite football team growing up wasn’t in BT4, but across the city, as he supported Linfield, and Rangers. His favourite singer is Al Green and his favourite comedian is Tommy Cooper.

Chris Nicholl’s favourite singer is Mick Jagger and his favourite comedian is Benny Hill. David McCreery is also a fan of Benny Hill, but his favourite singer is Rod Stewart.

Despite fronting an anti-smoking campaign, Sammy Nelson admitted to having the odd cigar to celebrate Arsenal winning a trophy. Interestingly, he was the first ever ex pupil of Inst, a school with a long Rugby association, to play international football. As of 1982, he was yet to be invited back to his old school. His favourite singer is Bob Seeger.

Mal Donaghy’s brother would be in Spain for the World Cup, but to cheer on Brazil, having formed the West Belfast Brazil Supporters Club.

There is also a mention of his 2 month old baby Ciaran “Mal’s hoping the latest member of the Donaghy clan, baby Ciaran will also be putting his best foot forward onto the soccer pitch”

Ciaran Donaghy has played in the Irish League, most notably with Cliftonville.

Billy Hamilton’s wedding anniversary fell during the 2nd Round of Spain 82, which he hoped he would still be in Spain for. Like Sammy Nelson, who he lists as his favourite comedian, he is a Rolling Stones fan. He states for his post football career, he hoped to own a business, which he did, setting up a Trophy and Engraving shop in Bangor, before selling it to Alan McDonald in 2009.

There is a double page poster of the qualifying campaign, while Billy Bingham gets a page to write about how his team shouldn’t be written off in Spain, despite a tough group, including this prophetic line, in relation to the 1958 team, and his 1982 team

“Who knows, maybe 24 years from now, in the year 2006, Northern Irish people will be talking about the feats of the 1982 team, with the same nostalgia and folklore attached to the 1958 team”

I think in 24 years on from 2006, they will still be talking about the achievements of 1982.

Ivan Little interviews sporting celebrities cheering on Northern Ireland such as Mike Gibson, Sean O’Neill, John Watson and Dermot Monteith. Alex Higgins is hoping that his Snooker schedule allows him to travel to Spain as a guest of ex Linfield player Sammy Pavis.

Martin O’Neill speaks of his pride at being captain, can speak a little French (unlike fellow Derry native Nadine Coyle) and his favourite bands are The Undertones (unsurprisingly), The Horselips and Jethro Tull.

There is a team poster in the middle, while some players have their baby photos featured.

Pat Jennings spoke of his regret that physiotherapist Bobby McGregor, who died the previous November, wouldn’t be in Spain.

There is a full page feature on players on the fringe of the squad, battling for a place such as Pat Rice, George Dunlop and Tom Sloan.

Interestingly, there is no mention in that article, or anywhere in the publication of Norman Whiteside, which would give an idea as to how late and unexpected his arrival in contention for a place in the squad was.

There is also a Smash Hits style lyric poster of the official team song, Yer Man, by Dana.

Sam Butler of News Letter writes a guide on what to do and not to do in Spain, warning fans that there will be a heavy police presence on the streets, and to beware of muggers.

On the back page, there is an advert simply saying “VIVA NORTHERN IRELAND ………… from the winning team at Downtown Radio”

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.7.1986

Diego Maradona, held aloft, carrying the World Cup trophy is the cover star of Shoot, as they look back at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

The editor’s page though, looks at the organisation of the tournament, criticising the standard of sound/pictures on the TV coverage, state of the pitches and standard of refereeing.

Elsewhere on the page, he bemoaned the number of British players now playing abroad, asking if stars like Frank McAvennie or Kenny Sansom will be next.

In a recurring theme from 1986 onwards, Bryan Robson has just come out of surgery, and his ready to return for Manchester United, while also appearing in an advert for New Balance boots.

England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s exploits in Mexico didn’t go unnoticed, as the three teams had a centre page poster, featuring a collage of match action from their games, with the headline ‘THEY DID US PROUD’

There is a free pull-out of a review of the competition, complete with match statistics and line-ups from every game.

Line 7 is another boot manufacturer having an advert in this issue, with France midfielder Jean-Marc Ferreri as their Brand Ambassador.

The tagline in the ad says “Jean-Marc Ferreri scored the equalising goal that helped France secure third place in the World Cup”

I’m no marketing expert, but I think that might need a bit of work.

There were three pages dedicated to an unseen victory for England at the 1986 World Cup, learning from their errors at the 1970 World Cup where they weren’t so open to the Mexican public.

FA Press Officer Glen Kirton used his A-Level Spanish to Liaise with locals, making sure that England’s time in Mexico ran smoothly.

It was pointed out that they had checked out training venues and hotels in Mexico in 1983, as well as a South American tour (1984) and Mexico friendlies (1985) the following summers, as well as players meeting and greeting locals while in Mexico.

During the tournament, players had a lot of free time. Gary Bailey spent most of his time reading a book or listening to his Ghetto Blaster.

England players made the most of movies lent to them by CBS.

Gary Lineker was the king of the pool table, though Glenn Hoddle gave him a run for his money. Hoddle was described as “Like John McEnroe, minus the fiery temper”

David McCreery gets a full page dedicated to him, as he is interviewed about his experiences of the tournament, having been described as Northern Ireland’s player of the tournament by manager Billy Bingham.

A third boot advert, this time Hi-Tec, endorsed by Peter Reid, Steve McMahon and Emlyn Hughes. The boot of Scousers.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, one reader asks if Greavsie thinks Bobby Robson is the right man to lead England. Greavsie speaks up in support of Robson, and was proved right as England reached the Semi-finals in 1990.

Niki Corrigan from Hartlepool writes in to say that Diego Maradona will be remembered as a cheat.

Denmark star Michael Laudrup is the subject of a player profile. He supports Liverpool and Leeds, and his favourite bands are : Wham, ELO, Stevie Wonder and Duran Duran.

His long-term ambition was to play for Denmark in the 1990 World Cup Finals in Italy. Unfortunately, Denmark didn’t qualify.

Having had three boot adverts, there was room for one more advert, but it was Uhlsport, for gloves, featuring some of the world’s best goalkeepers such as Pat Jennings, Walter Zenga, Peter Shilton, Joel Bats, and um …… Jim Platt of Coleraine.