MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.8.1993

The rhyming duo of Deane and Keane are the cover stars of this edition of The Magazine Archive as the 93/94 season is about to start, having made big money moves during pre-season to Leeds United (Brian Deane) and Manchester United (Roy Keane)

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread of Shoot staff offering predictions for the forthcoming season. Manchester United were heavily predicted to win the league, though there were suggestions for Aston Villa, Arsenal and West Ham.

Shoot aims to find the best footballer in the world, and this week is a play-off between Ally McCoist and Dean Saunders. A penel of Denis Law, Gary Stevens, Terry Yorath, Tony Coton and Howard Kendall gave McCoist the decision by a score of 243 to 237.

Tony Cascarino of Chelsea is the subject of a Q and A on the theme of First and Last, revealing that the last concert he was at was Steve Harley in Motherwell, when he was living in Scotland as a Celtic player.

Neil Webb issues a warning for Roy Keane, who is hoping to avoid the fate of Neil Webb, Ian Storey-Moore, Garry Birtles and Peter Davenport, who all flopped at Old Trafford after joining from Nottingham Forest.

In competitions, you could win a trip to Italy to see AC Milan in action, as well as getting to meet their players.

In posters, there was a poster of Coventry City’s Roy Wegerle, Mick Quinn, Peter Ndlovu.

In news, Chelsea have won a trophy, The Makita Tournament, beating Tottenham 4-0 in the Final at White Hart Lane.

Everton goalkeeper Neville Southall voices his opinion on the price of football, by stating that admission prices are too expensive for supporters.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 23.5.1987

Keith Houchen and Dave Bennett of Coventry City are the cover stars as Match reviews the 1987 FA Cup Final. Both players, holding aloft the trophy, were the two Coventry players to score. The winner came via Gary Mabbutt own goal.

The headline “Coventry’s Extra Specials” makes reference to the fact the game went to extra-time, as well as one of Coventry’s biggest exports of the 1980s, the band The Specials.

That match at Wembley gets a double page report as you open the magazine.

Derby County get a double page spread as they have returned to England’s top flight for the first time since 1980, the club having fallen into decline, being relegated to Division Three in 1985, just ten years after being League Champions in 1985.

England are playing Scotland in the annual fixture, which gets a double page spread.

Scarborough have made history by becoming the first club to win promotion to the Football League, and they get a double page spread.

Also celebrating promotion in 1987 were Portsmouth, who get a double page spread, having narrowly missed out in 1985 and 1986.

It’s not just about promotion, Match also looks at players who helped their club avoid relegation – Paul Goddard of Newcastle and Dean Saunders of Oxford.

In foreign news, Trevor Francis scores a title winning goal in Italy, as his goal for Atalanta against Inter Milan wins the title for Napoli.

There is a full page profile of Torquay United and Tottenham Hotspur.

In news, Manchester United have started using a computerised fitness testing programme called Body Talk.

Also getting a full page profile are Everton having just won the league.

Scotland isn’t left out, with posters of cup winners St Mirren and champions Rangers.

Staying in Scotland, Celtic are planning a summer spending spree after agreeing a sponsorship deal with CR Smith.

Scottish striker Joe Jordan gets a profile, as he prepares to play for Bristol City in a second successive Freight Rover Trophy Final, against Mansfield Town.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 30.7.1994

Lee Sharpe is the cover star, having just been signed as a columnist by Match.

This edition, came with a free wallchart ……. and Team Tabs.

Sharpe’s team-mate Mark Hughes is the subject of a competition, where one lucky reader could win a VHS of ‘Hughesie : The Mark Hughes Story’

Le Sharpe’s column gets a double page spread, which begins with him talking about his holidays, a week in Portugal with his girlfriend, then a week in Crete with 16 (SIXTEEN) of his mates.

He also speaks about Pre-Season, and who would be United’s biggest challengers in 94/95. He said that Blackburn would be United’s biggest challengers that season, and so it proved, with Blackburn winning the league.

He also addresses transfer speculation, stating that he has signed a five year deal with United, so “I’m not leaving any time soon”

He was sold to Leeds in 1996.

In news, Ian Wright has signed a new contract at Arsenal, worth a whopping 7,000 pounds a week, Coventry wanted to sign Alexi Lalas, and Leeds want to sign Thomas Skuhravy.

Bryan Robson, newly appointed Player-Manager at Middlesbrough is a poster, as is Dean Saunders, in full page form.

Meanwhile, John Fashanu is interviewed saying he wants to help, as a middleman, African players get moves to English clubs. Awooga.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9.5.1987

Glenn Hoddle is the cover star as Shoot counts down to the 1987 FA Cup Final between Coventry City and Tottenham Hotspur.

Glenn Hoddle gives Shoot an exclusive and revealing interview. He states that he wished Bobby Robson was appointed England manager earlier, and that if he was, he would be on course (he was 29 at the time of the interview) for 100 caps.

His England career ended in 1988 with 53 caps.

Hoddle also stated that he wished to move to Mainland Europe. He said he had turned down a move to Cologne in 1979 as he was too young, and an Achilles injury in 1984 saw Napoli withdraw their interest in making a bid for him.

He cited the examples of England team-mates Gary Lineker and Mark Hateley. At this time, there was a talent drain of English and British (Mark Hughes was already at Barcelona, and Ian Rush was soon to join Juventus) players due to a combination of being able to earn more money abroad, and most importantly, English clubs being banned from Europe as a result of Heysel.

That summer, Hoddle signed for AS Monaco, by a manager who would go on to make North London his home …… Arsene Wenger.

Interestingly, Hoddle also has his doubts as to wether Clive Allen (who scored 49 goals in 86/87) was up to the standard of international football. Allen only won 5 England caps and never scored a goal.

As part of the preview of the following week’s FA Cup Final, Tottenham’s Semi-Final win over Watford got a double page picture spread.

Gary Strodder, a rising star at West Ham, gets a full page feature.

Peter Reid gets a full page column, and writes a tribute to Everton’s squad players, who have contributed to them being on the verge of winning the title, which he believes they will. They did.

Jason Bate from from Stafford writes in to Jimmy Greaves to complain about the standard of facilities at English league grounds.

Greaves replies by saying the letter could have been written 25 years ago, and that things won’t change in another 25 years.

25 years on, I think it’s fair to say that facilities in English football have improved.

Dundee United, the first Scottish club to reach the UEFA Cup Final get a full page feature ahead of the first leg (Yes, younger readers, the UEFA Cup Final used to be 2 legs) and an interview with Iain Ferguson, who would miss the first leg through suspension.

The article comments that if Dundee United triumph, Scotland will have won all three European trophies. United lost 2-1 on aggregate, the first of three clubs (Celtic in 2003 and Rangers in 2008) to have lost the UEFA Cup Final.

Oxford United’s star striker Dean Saunders gets a full page profile, focusing on a range of coincidental similarities with former Oxford striker John Aldridge. Like Aldridge, Saunders would go on to play for Liverpool.

Shoot does a feature on the job security of managers in England’s top two divisions, and gives a rating for each manager.

Alex Ferguson, recently appointed at Manchester United, was given a rating of ‘Room For Improvement’

13 League titles, 5 FA Cups, 4 League Cups, 2 European Cups and 1 Cup Winners Cup later, i’d say things have improved.

In their section on world football, Soviet Union goalkeeper Rinat Dasiev confidently predicts that his side will win Euro 88, and that England will be their biggest rivals.

Soviet Union reached the final, losing 2-0 to Holland, having been in the same group as England. That match finished 3-1 to Soviet Union, as England finished bottom of their group, losing all 3 matches.

In the name of equality, Coventry’s FA Cup Semi-Final win over Leeds gets a double page spread.

This week’s player profile was of Kevin Gallacher, looking forward to the UEFA Cup Final with Dundee United.

His favourite TV shows are “Grange Hill and all sports programmes” and his favourite band are Simple Minds

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11th MAY 1996

Ryan Giggs and Jamie Redknapp are the cover stars, as Shoot previews the 1996 FA Cup Final between Manchester United and Liverpool.

It was a big news week, as well as an FA Cup final, there was the small matter of the appointment of a new England manager, as Glenn Hoddle leave Chelsea for England, and Shoot give it a page with quotes from former team-mates wishing him well.

As part of the cup final build-up, Robbie Fowler gets a double page spread about his career so far.

With less than a month to go, the Euro 96 build-up gets underwear with a double page interview with Paul Ince about England’s chances and his partnership with Paul Gascoigne.

In rumours that look silly now : Aston Villa want to bring Dean Saunders back to the club, Arsenal want to sign Gary McAllister and Trevor Sinclair is a target for Newcastle, Blackburn and Man United.

Rangers, having just won their eighth successive title get a double page spread, with only a small amount of coverage being given to the fact that Rangers were now only one behind Celtic’s then record of Nine in a row.

Jimmy Greaves gives his expert cup final opinion, stating that Man United might win, Liverpool might win, or it might end up a draw.

After rating both prospective line-ups, he gives both teams a score of 91 out of 110.

To balance out the Robbie Fowler double pager, Ryan Giggs gets his own one ahead of the Wembley game.

The advert for the following week’s edition promises a Scottish Cup Final preview as well as free Euro 96 stickers by Merlin (Even though the official one was done by Panini)

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10th AUGUST 1991

The second in a series of old magazines looks at Shoot from 10th August 1991, building up to the start of the 1991-1992 season.

They didn’t know it at the time, but English football was about to change forever, the seeds of this change would be found in the magazine.

The cover star is Dean Saunders, who recently joined Liverpool from Derby County for a (meagre by today’s standards) British record £2.9m in a joint transfer with Mark Wright, who cost £2.3m

Saunders was signed by new Liverpool manager Graeme Souness with the aim of helping Liverpool win the league title for the first time since 1990, a phrase which has been used every summer since then, but didn’t sound so bad in 1991.

The previous most expensive footballer in Britain was Gary Pallister at £2.3m, but the record changed hands on an annual basis between 1991 and 1996 with Alan Shearer, Roy Keane, Duncan Ferguson, Chris Sutton, Andy Cole and Stan Collymore all holding the record, before Alan Shearer once again broke the record with his £15m transfer from Blackburn Rovers to Newcastle United in 1996.

Pages 4 and 5 had a preview of the forthcoming season in English football’s top two divisions (I’m guessing Divisions Three and Four were done the week previously, as well as Scotland) in a race horsing them, rather randomly.

They predicted that defending champions Arsenal would retain their trophy (They finished a distant 4th).

They did correctly predict that Manchester United would finish runners-up.

To their credit, they did predict that Leeds United, who won the league that season would be “In with a shout”

Of the three clubs who were promoted from Division Two, they predicted that Blackburn Rovers (No Kenny Dalglish or Jack Walker at the club at this point) and Middlesbrough would reach the play-offs but eventual champions Ipswich Town were “One paced to say the least”

An article on the following page titled “Soccer in The Dock” looks at a High Court appeal by the Football League against the FA’s plans to launch a breakaway Premier League in 1992.

As everybody knows, this breakaway league was launched in August 1992, and England is now home to the “Greatest League In The World” …….. albiet, a pop band from Sheffield.

Page 8 has a page dedicated to all the new transfers which had happened in the previous week (with a picture of Mark Wright in friendly action against Dundalk)

With two players out (including David Platt) and five players in (including Kevin Richardson, Ugo Ehiogu and Les Sealey), Aston Villa were the most active club in the transfer market, and this was featured in a double page spread later in the magazine, focusing on Villa, about to enter their first season under new manager Ron “Big Ron” Atkinson, just nine years after being European Champions.

In his second season at the club, Atkinson led Villa to 2nd in the inagural season of the Premier League, but did win the League Cup in his third season.

Atkinson didn’t get a fourth season, having found out why Doug Ellis was known as “Deadly Doug” in November 1994, just six months after the League Cup win at Wembley, Villa’s first trophy since winning the 1982 European Cup.

A youngish and relatively unknown Neil Warnock gets a double page spread, as he prepared for his first season as a top-flight manager, having led Notts County to promotion via the play-offs at Wembley.

In terms of bizarre adverts, Sondico deserve an award for getting Bryan Robson, Gary Lineker and Ian Rush to dress up as mafioso to pormote shinguards. As you do.

Meanwhile, Tottenham Hotspur took out a double page advert aimed at promoting their latest range of merchandise, including various “FA Cup Winners 1991” T-shirts.

Steve Bould appears in an advert endorsing Arrow boots with the headline “A BOULD DECISION”

In 1991, all the cool kids at school wore Steve Bould boots, except for me and my pair of Jeff Spiers Specials.

In house advertising for the following week’s publication focused on Team Tabs.

If you don’t know what Team Tabs are, you’ve never lived.

Basically, they were tabs representing each team in the top four divisions in England and top two in Scotland (No Irish League ones though, and the League Of Wales was yet to be formed) that you placed in their league position through a specially cut hole.

I was actually a reader of Match in my youth, and would have only ever bought Shoot whenever there was something free.

I would have usually bought it during the summer for Team Tabs, but after getting the clubs into their places on the first Saturday of the season, i’d usually just give up, mainly due to the thought of doing it every Saturday teatime for the next nine months.