MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – SEPTEMBER 1992

Steve McManaman is mocked up as a superhero called McMana Man for the cover image, as he is described as English football’s superhero for the 1990s.

Ian Wright is interviewed and has modest ambitions for 92/93 – to get in the England team and to win the Premier League and FA Cup with Arsenal, predicting that he can make the most of the new backpass rule which stops goalkeepers picking the ball up from a backpass.

Steve McManaman is the subject of a double page feature, predicting he will become Liverpool’s greatest ever player, as well as tributes from the likes of Alan Hansen, Bruce Grobbelaar and Bradley Allen.

Don Howe is the subject of a profile, having just joined Chelsea as a coach, and his happy to be in that role rather than being a manager.

In world news, Marseille’s new signing Rudi Voeller believes that he can score the goals to win the European Cup for the French club.

Meanwhile, Manchester United have rejected a bid from Derby County to sign Bryan Robson, with the Rams hoping he would have had the same effect on them in the 90s as a similarly aged Dave Mackay did in the 1970s.

The forthcoming Premier League season is previewed, with all the Football Monthly journalists predicting that Arsenal will be champions in 1993.

Leeds United get a four page profile as they get set to defend their league title, looking at their success over the past four years under Howard Wilkinson.

The new Non League season is previewed, with Wycombe Wanderers being predicted to win promotion to the Football League.

Manchester City manager Peter Reid is interviewed, stating he stands by all his decisions, with City hoping to launch a title bid having come 5th in 1992.

In Scotland, the return of Trevor Steven to Rangers makes them favourites to win the title in 1993.

In competitions, you could win with Hummel, but you had a choice of a pair of boots or a replica shirt of either Benfica, Denmark or Real Madrid.

The preview of the new Irish League season predicts Glentoran to pip Linfield to the title and Ards to win the Irish Cup. Ards lost the Final while Linfield won the league.

In Republic of Ireland, there are concerns that easier access could affect attendances at domestic games, while Bohemians are predicted to win the league.

Advertisements

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 23.5.1987

Keith Houchen and Dave Bennett of Coventry City are the cover stars as Match reviews the 1987 FA Cup Final. Both players, holding aloft the trophy, were the two Coventry players to score. The winner came via Gary Mabbutt own goal.

The headline “Coventry’s Extra Specials” makes reference to the fact the game went to extra-time, as well as one of Coventry’s biggest exports of the 1980s, the band The Specials.

That match at Wembley gets a double page report as you open the magazine.

Derby County get a double page spread as they have returned to England’s top flight for the first time since 1980, the club having fallen into decline, being relegated to Division Three in 1985, just ten years after being League Champions in 1985.

England are playing Scotland in the annual fixture, which gets a double page spread.

Scarborough have made history by becoming the first club to win promotion to the Football League, and they get a double page spread.

Also celebrating promotion in 1987 were Portsmouth, who get a double page spread, having narrowly missed out in 1985 and 1986.

It’s not just about promotion, Match also looks at players who helped their club avoid relegation – Paul Goddard of Newcastle and Dean Saunders of Oxford.

In foreign news, Trevor Francis scores a title winning goal in Italy, as his goal for Atalanta against Inter Milan wins the title for Napoli.

There is a full page profile of Torquay United and Tottenham Hotspur.

In news, Manchester United have started using a computerised fitness testing programme called Body Talk.

Also getting a full page profile are Everton having just won the league.

Scotland isn’t left out, with posters of cup winners St Mirren and champions Rangers.

Staying in Scotland, Celtic are planning a summer spending spree after agreeing a sponsorship deal with CR Smith.

Scottish striker Joe Jordan gets a profile, as he prepares to play for Bristol City in a second successive Freight Rover Trophy Final, against Mansfield Town.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.10.1986

Mark Hughes, in the early months of his first season at Barcelona, is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot.

His fellow cover star Kerry Dixon is fighting back at critics who criticised his performance in England’s recent friendly defeat against Sweden.

Dixon will be on your TV screens at the weekend as his Chelsea team take on Manchester United, with United goalkeeper wanting revenge for the previous season’s defeat to Chelsea at Old Trafford during the title run-in. The previous season’s meeting was between two teams at the top, this time around it’s between teams in the bottom half.

In news, John Wark is wanted by Hearts, Aberdeen and Norwich, while Mickey Thomas is wanted by Wichita Wings in North America.

One man who did move was Kevin Richardson, who moved from Everton to Watford, and got a phone call from Elton John welcoming him to the club, and believed it was a wind-up from his former Everton team-mates.

Everton supporters with a tenner spare could join their Fan Club, advertised in this edition.

There were plans for a testimonial for Pat Jennings before the end of 1986 at Windsor Park between an All-Star British XI to take on a European XI.

In the editor’s column, editor Peter Stewart rubbishes the idea of a proposed “Super League”, pointing to the success of smaller clubs such as Wimbledon, Oxford and Charlton.

The same column also praises Luton Town for their ban on away supporters at Kenilworth Road, as they aim to combat hooliganism.

Brian Clough tells Shoot that he doesn’t want Forest star Franz Carr to get an England call-up, because his former club Blackburn will be due a payment as part of the transfer arrangement.

Talking of England, they’ve been invited to a tournament of former World Cup winners in Brazil in 1989 to commemorate 75 years of football in Brazil. England were paired in the same group as Brazil and Uruguay.

It was a tournament that Enzo Bearzot, Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning manager, won’t be taking part in, having just resigned from his role as national team manager.

Mark Wright is on the comeback trail after an injury during Southampton’s FA Cup Semi-Final against Liverpool which ruled him out of the World Cup in Mexico. He talks to Shoot about his experiences coming back from injury.

In Glasgow, it is young players that are the talk of the town, with Shoot doing a feature on breakthrough stars Tony Shepherd (Celtic), Ian Durrant and Derek Ferguson (Rangers)

Another (relative) youngster making a mark was 32 year old Wolves manager Brian Little, who gets a double page spread in what Shoot describe as “Football’s hardest job”

Cover star Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, where he lists his favourite things. Since you ask, his favourite bands are The Jam and U2.

Also getting a double page profile are Derby County, who Shoot describe as “on the march”, and so it proved as they got promoted to Division One in 1987.

The magazine ends with Charlie Nicholas uses his column to urge Scotland fans to stand by newly appointed manager Andy Roxburgh after a disappointing start to their Euro 88 Qualifying campaign.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : JIMMY HILL’S FOOTBALL WEEKLY – 31.10.1969

It’s the tail end of the 1960s, and it’s Jimmy Hill’s Football Weekly, a weekly magazine fronted by the multi talented Jimmy Hill (who died late last year), who was then a pundit for ITV.

You can’t really imagine Andy Townsend’s Football Weekly, can you?

Jimmy Hill uses his column to criticise a BBC reporter who was quick to criticise a recent Chelsea v Arsenal game, likening it to a playground game.

Johnny Morrissey of Everton writes a column and John Robson of Derby County gets a profile.

Ralph Brand, who has played top flight football in England and Scotland, is currently attending a Coaching School with the SFA, and writes a column claiming that Scotland is years behind in terms of coaching tactics.

Bobby Moncur of Newcastle United gets drawn by Ron Davies of Southampton.

There is a full page feature on Fulham, while future Fulham player George Best has a column, where he expresses his frustration at not being able to play for Northern Ireland in their World Cup Qualifier away to Soviet Union as he was playing in a League Cup tie for Manchester United.

Getting in early for the Christmas Market, there is an advert for Jimmy Hill’s Soccer 70, billed as “The best annual on the market”

Alan Birchenall of Chelsea has a column, where he states that footballers in the South of England are just as hard as their counterparts in the North.

There is a book review, of George Best’s Soccer Annual (strange to review a competitor to Jimmy’s own in the annual market) which gets a favourable review, despite the lack of colour photographs.

Ben Arentoft, a Dane playing at Newcastle United gets a profile, where he reveals his favourite meal is Roast Pork.

On the back cover, there was a poster of Brian Kidd of Mancheaster United.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.2.1997

Roy Keane is the cover star of this edition of Shoot from 1997, as Shoot does a feature on the in-form Manchester United player, listing facts about him and comments from team-mates and opponents.

England’s recent World Cup Qualifying defeat to Italy got a double page spread with the headline “IT AIN’T ZOLA YET” – A pun on the Italian goalscorer, Gianfranco Zola.

With failure to reach USA 94 still fresh in the mind, with only one team in the group guaranteed to qualify, there was a serious risk that England might fail to qualify for the 2nd successive World cup.

Despite being level with England with a game in hand, Italy fluffed this lead with 0-0 draws against Poland and Georgia to hand the initiative to England, who qualified by drawing their last group game 0-0 …….. against Italy, of course. Italy also qualified, beating Russia 2-1 in a play-off.

Shoot’s results service begins by focusing on recent internationals for England (v Italy) and Scotland (v Estonia, in a re-arranged game after the infamous abandoned game the previous October) in World Cup Qualifying action, and friendlies for Wales (v Republic Of Ireland) and Northern Ireland (v Belgium)

In Transfer News that now looks silly : Arsenal want to sign Beppe Singori, Blackburn Rovers want Bobby Robson as manager, and Chelsea want to sign Paul Ince.

Meanwhile, Derby County defender Paul McGrath has put his recent upturn in form down to not drinking alcohol any more.

Jamie Redknapp is now a pundit for Shoot, where readers write letters to him. One reader suggests a European football team. Redknapp dismisses this suggestion but champions a Britain football team.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.3.1986

It’s 1986, and Tony Woodcock, in dispute with his club Arsenal, is the cover star of Shoot, as the 1985-1986 season reaches it’s final straight.

Bryan Robson, having just scored his 18th international goal at the age of 29, gives an interview where he declares that he wishes to break Bobby Charlton’s goalscoring record for England (49, a record which stands to this day)

Robson fell short (by a bit) after retiring in 1991 with 26 goals.

He did acknowledge that Gary Lineker had a more realistic chance of being England’s all time top goalscorer. Lineker retired on 48 goals, just 1 short.

Trevor Brooking gets a double page spread to give his analysis of the five title challengers (Manchester United, Liverpool, Everton, Chelsea and West Ham United) and predicts that Everton will win the title. Liverpool ended up winning the title.

The letters prediction page predicts that Derby County, then in the Third Division, could be back in the First Division within two years. This was based on ambitious signings by manager Arthur Cox, who had made a bid for Nottingham Forest striker Nigel Clough.

Derby were promoted to the top flight in 1987, and Nigel Clough did join the club ……… as manager in 2009.

Jim Leighton is the subject of a player profile, where he revealed that he supports Rangers, and worked in a Dole Office before becoming a footballer, and that his favourite bands are Queen and U2.

The countdown to the World Cup is on, and includes an interview with Rachid Harkouk, a Londoner of Algerian descent playing for Notts County, looking to break into Algeria’s squad.

Pat Jennings, nearing the end of his career, gets a page of tributes from former team-mates such as Pat Rice and Bill Nicholson.

Jennings ended his career later that year, playing his last game in June, on his 41st birthday against Brazil in the World Cup.

Talking of Northern Ireland, Ron Soldi from Wollongong writes to Jimmy Greaves to ask why Northern Ireland don’t include George Best.

Despite being 40 when the tournament starts, and not played a competitive match in 2 years (for Tobermore United), Jimmy Greaves agrees with the letter writer.

The big game of the weekend in Scotland, Celtic v Dundee United, gets a full page profile. Celtic won the league that season on Goal Difference, with Dundee United finishing third.

On the back cover, there is a poster of Norman Whiteside, Sammy McIlroy and Billy Hamilton celebrating a goal, with the headline ‘MEXICO MEN’, as the World Cup gets closer.