MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 18.7.1998

Zinedine Zidane, holding the World Cup aloft, is the cover star of Match, as they review the 1998 World Cup. Printing deadlines must have been tight, as the final took place on July 12th 1998.

Match looks at Ariel Ortega, who had went into the World Cup hyped as “The new Maradona”, emulated him by being sent-off in his first World Cup as Argentina crashed out. Unlike Maradona, he didn’t rectify it four years later.

Readers were treated to a compilation of Kevin Keegan’s finest commentary moments.

Lee Hendrie gets asked who his favourite Spice Girl is. After much hesitation, he plucked for Sporty Spice.

Phil Neville does the taste test, where he gets asked his favourites between two. Unsurprisingly, he picks Spice Girls (David and Victoria would have been very unhappy) over All Saints, and he prefers McDonalds over Burger King.

France’s win over Brazil gets four pages, with most of the focus being on Zinedine Zidane, where he speaks about the key moments of the game, and how he felt at each time.

Ryan Giggs gets asked for his Hits and Misses of France 98, labelling Michael Owen, Christian Vieri and Rivaldo as Hits, and Faustino Asprilla, Raul and Alessandro Del Piero as Misses.

Michael Owen gets a double page interview focusing on his meteoric rise over the past eighteen months, offering advice for aspiring young footballers.

Premier League stars such as Gary Croft, Rob Savage (yes, that’s what it said), Don Hutchinson, Mark Schwarzer and Christian Dailly were asked for their best and worst moments of the World Cup. Christian Dailly, listed his favourite game as England v Romania, when Romania won 2-1 in injury time.

MAGAZNE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 28.8.1999

Paul Scholes, not usually noted for doing interviews, is the cover star of Match, as the 1999-2000 season is in it’s early stages.

In news, Ron Atkinson, recently retired from football, is now working as a Brand Ambassaor for AOL.

Aaron Hughes gets featured as a promising youngster. Seth Johnson of Derby County gets asked for his three favourite TV shows, which are : Only Fools and Horses, Emmerdale, and Dream Team.

Match does an interview with Paul Scholes, where he talks about his love of scoring goals, his discipline, and how things will be harder for United after winning the treble.

There was only a page in the interview, so Match does a double page spread about Scholes most important and best goals.

Match does a feature where they write to Premier League players asking for signed photos and advice on how to be a footballer, using the psuedonym Paul Bezant.

18 players out of 42 replied, with Robbie Keane taking 169 days before sending in a signed Wolves programme.

Don Hutchison replied with a signed photo and advice “Keep working hard and stay dedicated to football and you will get noticed”

Michael Owen sent a reprinted signed photograph …….. and a Michael Owen Merchandise Catalogue.

Newly promoted to the Premier League, Watcford get three pages where Nick Wright, who scored an overhead kick in the play-off final at Wembley, gives a profile of his team-mates.

To link those two stories, I wrote to Watford in 1999 asking for Mark Williams and Peter Kennedy’s autographs ……. and they sent them out.

In competitions, you could win a chance to hang out with Ugo Ehiogu.

In a forerunner of MTV Cribs, Ian Harte shows us around his house in a double page spread. In it, he shows off his CD collection, but admits that he takes music advice from his Fiance.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 23.1.1993

There’s a Welsh theme to this week’s cover of Shoot, as Gary Speed and Dean Saunders, battling for possession are the cover stars.

The editorial for this edition looks at recent postponements, and dismisses the idea that English football should have a Winter break. Seems some debates never die.

Posters included in this week’s edition are a random bunch : Don Hutchinson, Lawrie Sanchez, Dundee United team, Martin Keown and Jorginho.

It’s the weekend of the FA Cup 4th Round, and Manchester United take on Brighton at Old Trafford, in a repeat of the 1983 Final. Steve Foster, in a second spell at Brighton, played in the replay (He was banned from the final) and was interviewed about the game, and his memories of 1983.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, a reader from Corby writes in to question QPR’s 5 million pound valuation of Les Ferdinand. In 1995, Les Ferdinand left QPR for Newcastle for a fee of 6 million pounds.

Shoot dedicates a double page spread to reviewing the standard of punditry on BBC, ITV and Sky Sports.

Gary Lineker is described as “His attempts at humour are like Ian Botham on A Question Of Sport (ie – not funnny at all)” – I could not possibly comment.

Shoot also mocked Andy Gray for his frequent use of the term “That’s a great example for all the kids watching”

Meanwhile, Kevin Keegan is given a platform to showcase his four point plan for the future of English football, which includes reducing the Premier League to 18 teams (It was reduced to 20 teams in 1995), Professional referees, five subs (This was introduced to the Premier League in 1996) and games being split into four periods of 25 minutes.

Oh well, three good ideas out of four aren’t bad.

Neil Webb, having rejoined Nottingham Forest from Manchester United gets a double page profile about the move.

Shoot did a series during this season where they visited clubs to see who could win a 100m Sprint, Hardest Shot, Long throw.

There was a shock at Dundee as goalkeeper Paul Mathers had the hardest shot. Unfortunately, his score for Longest Throw and Hardest Shot weren’t enough to get him in the overall Top Three, taken from all the clubs who had participated so far.

Maybe it was that article which convinced David Jeffrey to sign him for Linfield in 1999?

Harvey Lim of Gillingham (Longest Throw) and Neil Masters of Bournemouth (Hardest Shot) were the leaders, since you ask.