MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.6.1986

Action from the opening game of Mexico 86 between Bulgaria and Italy is on the cover of Shoot, as they bring you the latest news from the ongoing World Cup.

England are hoping to win it for the first time since 1966, and their winning captain that day, Bobby Moore, is now a columnist for Shoot, and he lists the players that have impressed him in the opening games, such as Socrates, Maradona, Platini, Papin, Boniek, as well as Randy Regan and Bruce Wilson of Canada.

Bryan Robson is hoping to emulate his fellow Shoot columnist by lifting the trophy, but it hasn’t got off to the best of starts, as he writes of his frustration of England failing to win their first two games, but predicts England will reach the knock out stages. Beside his column is an advert for New Balance, which he endorses.

There is a double page interview with Jim Leighton, where he reveals that he didn’t want to be a goalkeeper.

News from Mexico includes that Fenerbache made approached Franz Beckenbauer to quit West Germany and become manager of Fenerbache, while in Italy, there is a potential match fixing scandal about to blow open.

Italy’s group opponents Bulgaria haven’t made many friends, by holding training behind closed doors and having armed guards outside their training facilities.

Shoot’s man in Mexico, Bill Day brands England’s performances “A disgrace”, while being complimentary about Northern Ireland, despite losing 2-1 to Spain.

Ray Daly from County Offaly writes to Jimmy Greaves to suggest that when Ron Atkinson’s inevitable departure as Manchester United manager is confirmed, the job should go to United legend Lou Macari.

There is a round-up of results from the 1985-1986 Scottish League seasons, with Steve Cowan of Hibs being top scorer, 2 ahead of Brian McClair. Both men would go on to win league titles outside their native country, Cowan with Portadown and McClair with Manchester United.

Outside of the World Cup, Republic Of Ireland are making progress under Jack Charlton, already lifting a trophy by winning a triangular tournament in Iceland against the hosts and Czechoslovakia.

Steve Hodge gets a full page profile having broken into the England squad in time to head to Mexico. A potential Aston Villa team-mate of Hodge’s is John Hewitt, in a contract dispute with Aberdeen, which gets a full page feature. Discussions are on hold at the moment, due to Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson being in Mexico in his role as Scotland manager.

Nigel Winterburn of Wimbledon, looking forward to playing in the top flight for the first time, gets a full page interview, where he credits his former manager at Birmingham, Jim Smith, with saving his career.

There is also a full page profile of League of Ireland champions Shamrock Rovers.

In club news, Alex Ferguson spoke of his dislike for agents after Eric Black moved to Metz, while Liam Brady was leaving unsubtle hints for Arsenal to buy him back.

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TURIN BRAKES – LIVE AT FOPP COVENT GARDEN 26.1.2018

I’ve never been to Italy before and I’ve love to see Juventus in the flesh. I could even make do with going to a Torino match. Oh wait, it said Turin Brakes for free, not Turin Breaks for free.

This wouldn’t be a runner-up prize, I loved Turin Brakes back in 2001, and when it was announced that they would be doing an instore gig at Fopp in Covent Garden on the weekend I was in London, I knew I would be taking advantage of it.

What is Fopp? It is the most amazing shop in the world. CDs, DVDs, everything from film and music and ridiculously cheap prices. I love it. I make a point of visiting it whenever I visit England or Scotland.

Sadly, they don’t have any Northern Ireland stores, so we’ll just have to do without. Come on Fopp, if Greggs can come over here ………

Turin Brakes started off as a duo but have bow expanded to a four piece. They were playing a free gig in Fopp as they had just released their new album that day (Friday 26th January 2018) titled Invisible Storm.

Before starting their set, they apologised in advance if they “Fucked it up” as they are still learning the songs.

They played three songs from their new album, the highlight of which was Life Forms, before finishing on their biggest hits Underdog (Save Me) and Painkiller.

Photo Album

LONDON STREET ART JANUARY 2018

As you will have seen from my previous blog post, I was in London over the previous weekend. It wasn’t exclusively for Street Art, but it would have been rude not to get some photos.

I had been to London previously before, so I knew where I wanted to go. Camden and Shoreditch were high on my list.

As my train from the Airport was terminating at Liverpool Street, this gave me a great opportunity to check out Shoreditch.

Well, it would have, if I didn’t wander about and get lost.

I cheated a wee bit by referring to London’s Tourism Website, which informed me that Spitalfields was a good place to visit. I had passed it on my travels, so made an about turn and headed for there.

How right it was. I spotted one piece, decided to walk to the end of the street, then saw more pieces on the next street, and decided to walk to the end of that street to see what there was …. and repeat. I think I covered every street in Spitalfields, which included pieces by Falko and Dan Kitchener, who have recently done pieces in Belfast.

I stumbled onto more Street Art and eventually found Shoreditch. From previous experience, Car Park Attendants were a bit dickish when I tried to snap pieces in Car Parks, so I had to do quick snaps of those pieces rather than setting myself up.

Smokers are a pain in the arse at the best of times, but they all decided to congregate outside Mercure Hotel in Shoreditch, denying me the opportunity of shooting a mural outside it.

There was also a piece with Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un being in a band called The Psychos.

By the middle of Friday afternoon, I already had enough Street Art photos to fill a blog for the entire weekend.

On Saturday morning, I headed to Brixton to see the David Bowie mural in it’s current form. I had previously seen the mural, finding it by accident, when I visited Brixton in 2014. It is a rarity amongst David Bowie murals in that it was actually painted when he was alive.

When he died in 2016, the mural became a shrine and meeting point for fans to share their grief.

The core of the mural is now covered in Perspex due to the number of fans writing messages over it. There is now a sign asking fans to write around it and not on it, as well as flowers left by fans at the bottom of the mural.

Not far from the Bowie mural is a mural of the poem The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe, though that has fallen into a state of disrepair.

I walked around Brixton, and stumbled upon some pieces around Brixton Market, including a tribute to various Rappers.

I then headed to Camden, a hotspot for Street Art and found a lot of pieces walking from Camden Underground Station to Camden Lock.

Camden Underground Station is exit only, so I had to travel to Mornington Crescent Underground Station for my onward journey, and the diversion was a stroke of luck, as I spotted more pieces, although it was hard to get photos due to parked vehicles causing an obstruction.

Sunday was spent visiting the more clichéd touristy parts of London, so I didn’t get as much photos as in the previous days, though I did spot a mural just off Carnaby Street.

Heading home on Monday night, Monday was never going to be a busy day, but I made a point to visit Leake Street Tunnel near Waterloo Station, a tunnel dedicated to Street Art which has multi-coloured lighting, which made for some decent photos.

As stated in my main blog about London, I was tempted by the idea of a day trip to Brighton at some point, as it would have been nice to have visited there for the day and get some Street Art photos.

Can’t complain about my lot. Every time I visit London, I seem to find more and more hidden Street Art gems. Hope you enjoy this round-up.

Photo Album 1

Photo Album 2

London Street Art 2016

London Street Art 2014

Camden Street Art 2013

LONDON

A week and a bit ago, I headed to London for a short break. It’s fair to say I enjoyed myself.

Why London? Usually, in late January or early February, I like to go away somewhere for a weekend.

I would have preferred to go to Mainland Europe, but there wasn’t a lot of value when I went to book it. September 2017 was a busy month for me so I didn’t get a chance to book anything until October.

London was a lazy option, but still a good option. I’d been before previously and enjoyed myself.

This was my first proper visit to London since 2014. I had been in London briefly in 2016, spending a day there as I was flying home from Gatwick after a stay in Paris.

However, I would not be flying in and out of Gatwick. My previous visits to London had seen me use Gatwick, but this time, I would be flying in and out of Stansted.

There would also be a change in my accommodation arrangements from my previous London visits as well. In my two previous stays in 2013 and 2014, I stayed in Paddington, but this time I would be staying at Easyhotel in Victoria. I would have to make do without a TV of Wifi in my room, but getting three nights in Central London for £87, I couldn’t really complain.

Flying into Stansted meant I would be travelling through London, and I got to see cranes that were working on Northumberland Development Project, better known as Spurs New Ground, from the train window.

Whenever I go away somewhere, there are two things I really want to see – Street Art and Football.

With the train from Stansted terminating at Liverpool Street, it gave me a perfect opportunity to search for Street Art, as I would be near to Shoreditch, where I had visited on my previous visit in 2014.

I walked around a bit and got lost, so I cheated by referring to the internet, London’s Tourism website has a feature on Street Art.

After lunch, I headed back towards Liverpool Street, racking up the step count. Yep, I got an Activity Tracker for Christmas, so i’ve become one of those guys. In case you care, I had four successive days going over 30,000 steps. You’ve no idea how much my feet hurt.

I stumbled into Spitalfields and specifically, Spitalfields Market. What a place. I’m annoyed at myself that I only discovered it on this visit.

Having walked past a man in a Coleraine shirt at Liverpool Street Station, I got a reminder of Irish League when I visited a stall of Scrabble Art, motivational phrases spelt out with Scrabble letters, one of which said “Fortune Favours The Brave”. A more apt one for Linfield players would have been the one that said “Keep it simple”.

£30 though, so I gave it a miss.

Spitalfields Market had lots of fantastic independent and quirky stalls. I really am annoyed at myself for only discovering it on this visit.

Having checked London’s Tourism Website, I was aware that there was a lot of Street Art in Spitalfields, so I went to check it out.

I used my instinct and stumbled upon pieces. I kept saying to myself that i’ll just walk to the end of the street, then spot something on the next street, and I just kept walking and walking, snapping loads of Street Art, only stopping to pop into a Vintage Market I stumbled onto. If I ever visit London again, i’m going to make Spitalfields a place I visit.

By Friday afternoon, it was time to check into my hotel. As stated earlier, it was Easyhotel in Victoria, a very convenient location for getting to and a very conveniently located hotel.

I was in Room 13. Thankfully, i’m not supersticious about that number. It might have been a different matter if it was Room 9 after seeing the Hotel Zanzibar episode of inside Number 9.

Just thought i’d sneak it in about how Inside Number 9 is the best thing on TV at the moment.

My original plan was to visit Camden as soon as I checked in, but having spent so much time walking around Spitalfields, I was a bit behind schedule.

I wanted to get Street Art photos in Camden, but with the sky getting darker, I decided I would leave that until Saturday morning. I had a teatime appointment in Covent Garden.

I was aware that Turin Brakes were doing an instore gig at Fopp in Covent Garden, so I decided to head over. I loved them back in 2001, and I was getting a free concert, so it would have been rude not to.

I headed to Covent Garden Underground Station to the venue. Did you know that Covent Garden Underground Station has 193 steps from the Platform to the Exit? I do. I found that out the hard way.

The funny thing is, I saw a massive queue of people wanting to use the list. I thought they were being lazy. Turns out they were smart. I won’t be making that mistake again if I visit Covent Garden.

After the instore gig, I went for a gentle stroll around Covent Garden, before getting a bite to eat before finding a bar to watch the United match, before heading to bed or a (relatively) early night.

When you are in London, you can take advantage of free publications such as Time Out or Metro to see what is on, which is what I did.

On Saturday morning, I headed to Brixton. I wanted to see the David Bowie mural in it’s current form. I had previously seen the mural in 2014. When he died in 2016, it became a shrine to him and a meeting point for fans to share their grief. There’ll be a write-up on the Bowie mural on the Street Art blog which will follow this.

During my time in Brixton, I spotted and snapped Street Art, checking out Brixton Market, and taking a stroll along Electric Avenue, immortalised in song by Eddy Grant.

After Brixton, it was Camden next for me, for pretty much the same thing, snapping Street Art and checking out the market. Every time I go to London, I make a point to visit Camden. The only downside is that it is infested with smelly tramps puffing on fags and vapes. Not cool. It really drags down the standard of the place.

Camden Underground Station is exit only, so to leave Camden, I had to get The Tube at Mornington Crescent. I took advantage of this detour by stumbling onto some more Street Art.

Saturday afternoon was spent watching Millwall v Rochdale in the FA Cup.

I checked the listings guides and there were some comedy gigs on, but I decided to go for a bite to eat, and then relax.

Up early, Sunday morning was spent being all touristy, having a walk around the main City Centre shopping areas such as Leicester Square, Carnaby Street, Soho, Covent Garden and Trafalgar Square.

Another day, another market, having a stroll though Covent Garden Market, and catching part of an entertainment show by Covent Nick.

I then headed back to Brixton to purchase stuff that I had my eye on the previous day (I didn’t want to take loads of shopping bags to a football match) before heading to The London Studios for the recording of Unspun for Dave.

Unfortunately, I got lost, and found myself at the back of the queue, meaning that I missed out on getting a seat. There is compensation that I can get priority tickets for future TV recordings, so at least I can bank that for use at some point in the future.

I took the opportunity with my unexpected free time to walk along Southbank and check out Southbank Book Market, and taking in some of the views on offer at Southbank, before putting my feet up for the night.

Monday was a more relaxed day. Not going to lie, I was very tempted by a day trip to Brighton, especially as I was staying near to the train station that serves Brighton from London. If I was flying out from Gatwick, I would definitely done so, as there is a train direct from Brighton to Gatwick which is just over half and hour. If I go to London again, I might book an extra day and set it aside to go to Brighton.

I took the opportunity to head back to Southbank and walk along Jubliee Greenway. I was even able to see the Houses of Parliament, but as I have minimal interest in politics, I found it a bit meh to be honest. I was more excited at seeing the roof of Spurs new ground.

There was one last piece of Street Art for me to spot, calling in to see Leake Street Tunnel on my way back to Waterloo Station as I headed back to Spitalfields Market for a bit of lunch and relaxation before heading to Stansted to fly home.

As previously stated, I stayed in Paddington on my previous visits to London, changing to Victoria for this one. I like Paddington, and I enjoyed my stays there, but if I go back to London, I would try to use Victoria again, especially as you can have the option of a day trip to Brighton on your last day if I was flying back from Gatwick.

At the end of it, I had very sore feet and a lot of photos to sort through. I guess that was the sign of a good trip.

London 2013

London 2014

London 2016

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.2.1986

The other way around from the movie series, it is Bond sending rather than receiving an SOS, as Birmingham City manager John Bond wants to bring cover star Trevor Francis beck to St Andrews from Sampdoria.

As you open the magazine, Mark Hughes tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Manchester United, amidst rumours of a move to Barcelona.

In news, Terry Venables is linked with a move to Spurs at the end of the season, while leaving White Hart Lane could be Ally Dick, linked with a move to Hibs.

In World Cup news, Billy Bingham hits back at criticism of Northern Ireland’s preparation being against heavyweight sides such as Denmark and France, while Scotland manager Alex Ferguson has added Archie Knox and Craig Brown to his backroom staff for their campaign in Mexico.

Cover star Francis tells Shoot he is still available for England, having missed a recent friendly due to injury, and suggests he could create a place for himself in right midfield in Mexico.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that the recent signing of Terry Gibson could be a boost for Manchester United in the title race.

In Scotland, Falkirk winger Jimmy Gilmour is playing so well, he is drawing comparisons to his uncle, former Celtic winger Jimmy Johnstone.

Crystal Palace manager Steve Coppell, only 30, tells Shoot that his side have had to change their style of play in order to get results, after previously missing out despite playing well.

Having saved Manchester City and Swansea City from relegation, John Bond is looking for a hat-trick by keeping Birmingham City up. In order to do this, he tells Shoot he wants to bring Trevor Francis back to the club, after Francis left to join Nottingham Forest in 1979 in England’s first £1m transfer.

Gary Mabbutt gets scouted by Shoot during Tottenham Hotspur’s match against Nottingham Forest, stating that he was exposed against a striker like Peter Davenport.

Back to Scotland, and Aberdeen’s John Hewitt tells Shoot that Dons manager Alex Ferguson is hard to please.

West Brom’s George Reilly tells Shoot he is happy at The Hawthorns after a short spell at Newcastle United.

Kenny Swain tells Shoot that he believes his experience of winning the title with Aston Villa in 1981 will help Portsmouth as they aim to get promoted to the top flight for the first time in 27 years.

West Ham goalkeeper Phil Parkes is having the best season of his career, and owes it to giving up booze after a drink driving ban in January 1985.

Ian Rush uses his column to praise his Liverpool team-mate Sammy Lee, who is celebrating his 27th birthday thsi week.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a double page spread on how Sunderland fans are losing patience with Lawrie McMenemy, after failing to launch a promotion bid.

The magazine ends with a “Focus On …..” Gordon Durie. His favourite bands are Depeche Mode and Simple Minds.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 27.12.1980

Santa Claus of North Pole United in the cover star of Shoot, as the first Christmas of the 1980s approaches.

Except, that it’s not Santa Claus, it’s a footballer dressed up as him. All will be revealed on page 2.

Out mystery Santa is someone who enjoys dressing up in red and white, Tony Woodcock of Arsenal.

Shoot gets in the Christmas spirit by suggesting presents for various football personalities, with a razor for bearded Aston Villa player Dennis Mortimer, while Watford chairman Elton John is suggested a piano with a TV screen so that he can watch Watford matches while he is on tour. I’m not sure that has actually been invented. I might just try and copyright that.

Shoot reviews the first-half of the English league season, with Liverpool and Aston Villa level on points at the top, with Liverpool looking to become the first team since the 1930s to win 3 titles in a row, while Aston Villa are looking for their first title in 71 years.

Eamonn McCabe, Sports Photographer Of The Year, gets a double page spread showing his favourite photos from 1980, while there is a competition to win a camera.

Ray Clemence uses his column to look back at the year, with the high of Liverpool winning the league and a low of England’s group exit at the European Championship.

There is a double page photo collage of Wales and England’s recent World Cup Qualifiers, with the headline “Spain – Here We Come”.

Wales didn’t make it to Spain, and England just about qualified.

Liverpool’s reserve team gets a full page feature, asking four of their players – Ian Rush, Howard Gayle, Steve Ogrizovic and Richard Money – what it’s like to play for Liverpool’s reserves.

Liverpool’s title rivals Aston Villa are featured on the next page, looking at their “Dunfermline connection”, as two players from the Fife town, Allan Evans and Ken McNaught, playing their part in Villa’s title bid.

In news, Graham Gooch is training with West Ham to keep himself fit during Cricket’s off-season.

Shoot does a feature on “Forgotten Heroes”, the players who are struggling to get first team action in 1980.

Dundee get a team poster while Phil Neal gets a player profile. His favourite music is Michael Jackson, Gerry Rafferty and ELO.

There is a joint interview with Peter McCloy (Rangers) and Pat Bonner (Celtic) about what it’s like to play in goal for an Old Firm team.

Staying in Scotland, Gordon McQueen uses his column to look back at 1980, and reveals that a clairvoyant that a great 1981 has been predicted for him.

Aston Villa travel to Brighton over Christmas, and John Gregory of Brighton, a former Villa player, tells Shoot that the club deserves success.

In South America, Uruguay were hosting a tournament to celebrate 50 years since the first World Cup, involving all former winners. England declined the option as it would have involved postponing league games over Christmas. Meanwhile, Shoot does a joint interview with Diego Maradona and Alfredo Di Stefano.

Clive Allen uses his column to state that he is looking forward to Crystal Palace’s trip to Southampton, mainly for the opportunity to meet Kevin Keegan.

John Chiedozie of Leyton Orient is profiled, with his manager describing his as “England’s best winger”

Unfortunately for Ron Greenwood, he was already declared himself for Nigeria.

Andy Gray writes in his column about how injuries have benefitted Wolves, as it has presented first-team opportunities to some of their promising youngsters.

Manchester United get featured, with Shoot focusing on the fanaticism of their fans, suggesting that girls born in Manchester are likely to be called Louise (after Lou Macari) or Samantha (after Sammy McIlroy)

Shoot does a double page spread on players they predict to be “England’s Superstars Of The 1980s”, listing players such as Craig Johnston, Gary Shaw, Steve McMahon, Remi Moses, Sammy Lee, Gary Mabbutt, Peter Beardsley and Adrian Heath to make an impact in the upcoming decade.

There is a photo compilation of the biggest footballing moments of 1980, while there is a calendar for 1981.

With 18 months to go, the countdown to the 1982 World Cup is already underway, with Spanish clubs spending a combined £50m modernising their stadiums to host games, with Shoot giving a club by club breakdown.

Peter Shilton uses his column to champion Terry Butcher’s cause for a place in the England team, and reveals he’s always been a fan of Tottenham due to the way they played football in the 60s.

Derek Johnston’s column recalls Andy Cameron’s stand-up routine at the Player Of The Year Awards where he made fun of players of every club, including his beloved Rangers.

There is also a feature on managers such as Dave Sexton, Brian Clough, Ron Saunders and Lawrie McMenemy who have all went on to bigger things despite experiencing the sack early in their career.

2017 IN PICTURES – DECEMBER (SO FAR …)

Here we are, the final photo round-up of 2017, looking back at my adventures in December. Well, December so far.

December began with a trip to Windsor Park to see Linfield take on Dungannon Swifts.

That was followed by a trip to Ulster Hall to see The Divine Comedy in concert.

I was hoping to follow that with a trip to Carrick to see Linfield play Carrick Rangers, but that was postponed due to snow.

I decided to make the most of a football free Saturday, by going out and getting pictures of the snow in Belfast.

There was one final concert for 2017, as I headed to The Limelight to see The Charlatans.

The following day, I flew to Manchester, to see United take on Bournemouth primarily, but I also managed to squeeze in some Street Art photos from Manchester and Salford Quays.

Upon my return, I headed to Windsor Park to see Linfield play Warrenpoint Town and draw 3-3.

The following Saturday, it was another visit to Windsor Park to see Linfield beat Cliftonville 2-0.

There’s still eight days left in December, i’ll be at The Oval on Boxing Day, and then back to Windsor Park next Saturday for more photo adventures.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series looking back at 2017 In Pictures. I’m already looking forward to see what 2018 will bring in terms of photo adventures.

Linfield v Dungannon Swifts

The Divine Comedy live at Ulster Hall

The Divine Comedy live at Ulster Hall Photo Album

Belfast Snow December 2017

Snow – Friday 8th December Photo Album

Snow – Saturday 9th December Photo Album

Snow – Sunday 10th December Photo Album

The Charlatans live at The Limelight

The Charlatans live at The Limelight Photo Album

Manchester Street Art

Manchester Street Art Photo Album

Manchester United v AFC Bournemouth

Manchester United v AFC Bournemouth Photo Album

Salford Quays Street Art

Salford Quays Street Art Photo Album

Linfield v Warrenpoint Town

Linfield v Cliftonville

SALFORD QUAYS STREET ART – DECEMBER 2017

After all these years, I think I might have been getting the name of this blog series wrong all this time. I checked the signage, and it appears this area is known as Pomona Wharf.

Between you and me, i’ll still keep calling it Salford Quays. As you get the tram to Media City or Eccles from Picadilly, you can’t miss it when you look out the window.

Having worked out that the stop to get off is at Cornbrook, I began to start doing this when I am in Manchester, getting off there and walking along getting as many photos as possible.

I was in Manchester from Tuesday to Thursday, but I waited until Thursday to get photos. It was the afternoon, but it got dark really early there, though there was some sunlight that was there made some shots awkward.

There were some old pieces, I left them, and new ones, which I unsurprisingly snapped.

My favourite one was one of a Transformer. I don’t know what one it is, because it’s been a while since I last watched Transformers. My shadow appearing in the images was intentional, but that and the dark sky above makes the image almost apocalyptic.

Until my next stroll along the canal, enjoy.

Photo Album

Salford Quays Street Art May 2017

Salford Quays Street Art November 2016

Salford Quays Street Art May 2016

MANCHESTER UNITED 1-0 AFC BOURNEMOUTH 13.12.2017

On Wednesday night, I made my first visit of the season to Old Trafford, as Manchester United took on AFC Bournemouth.

Win, lose or draw, I was hoping to have a better time than when I previously went to see United take on Bournemouth, having been evacuated from the ground prior to a match in May 2016, which was ultimately postponed.

United have made progress this season, but not as much as hoped. They’ve advanced in two cup competitions and are still to join in the FA Cup. It’s the League that matters, and United are chasing Manchester City and a gap of eleven points following defeat to them on the Sunday before this.

United sit 2nd in the table, but they’re not in a title challenge at the moment. A win on Sunday would have put them in one. Defeat means they’re the best of the rest, trying to swat off the teams below them instead of trying to overtake the team above them.

In short, this was a must-win game for United. Especially after Chelsea won the night before, and that Manchester City, Arsenal and Liverpool would be facing clubs in the bottom three and all looking likely to pick up victories.

Jesse Lingard had a spectacular attempt on goal that went wide in the first minute as United went straight on the attack. It was not to be the start of an onslaught.

In fact, it was Bournemouth who had the better of things in the early stages. Charlie Daniels being able to run at United’s defence to have a shot which was saved by De Gea, while Dan Gosling had a shot saved by De Gea after the original cross evaded him.

The best that United could offer was an Anthony Martial cross which narrowly evaded Juan Mata.

On 25 minutes, United took the lead when a header from Romelu Lukaku hit the back of the net. It was against the run of play, but United had the lead.

Lukaku’s only previous involvement prior to that was heading clear in his own box, to sarcastic cheers from a small section of the crowd, which United couldn’t totally get rid of, Phil Jones having to spectacularly head voer in his own six yard box.

The goal didn’t deflate Bournemouth, with David De Gea having to save from Ryan Fraser, who cheekily tried to exploit a gap he left when anticipating a cross.

United began the second-half looking for the second goal they needed to secure the points. Juan Mata had a shot blocked on the edge of the box while Anthony Martial fired over from a few yards out, after Lukaku’s shot was blocked, when he really should have scored.

I was sat in the back row, and one advantage of this was that the Corporate Boxes were right behind me, so I could have a sneaky look at the TVs behind me if I needed to see a replay.

It was Martial’s last involvement in the game as he was subbed for Marcus Rashford.

Rashford’s first involvement was to keep alive a Scott McTominay cross which evaded everyone to set up Jesse Lingard, who slipped. Rashford then hit the bar from the edge of the box, as his introduction gave United’s attack in injection of life that had been missing so far.

Borunemouth responded with a substitution of their own, bringing on Jermaine Defoe. Despite struggling at Bournemouth so far, he’s still a player with an eye for goal. He scored in his first couple of games against United for West Ham, so I have it in my head that he always scores against United.

He gave United fans a worry when his shot from a tight angle was saved by David De Gea’s legs.

The mood wasn’t helped by United’s inability to keep possession. This was summed up by Marcus Rashford trying to win a corner from a corner by hitting it off a Bournemouth player, the ball going straight to Bournemouth’s goalkeeper Asmir Begovic.

As the full-time whistle approached, Bournemouth won a free-kick outside the box, which was teed up to Ryan Fraser, but shot straight at De Gea.

3 minutes and 50 seconds into 4 minutes of injury time, that was Bournemouth’s last chance, as United took the points.

David De Gea being the matchwinner against Arsenal shouldn’t be that much of a surprise, but he shouldn’t be the matchwinner at home to Bournemouth.

It was a win, but not quite the response United needed. They won’t get away with it if they play like it in upcoming games against on form Bristol City, Burnley and Everton.

I would have included Leicester on the list, but they’ve since lost 3-0 at home to Crystal Palace, equally on form.

When I booked the trip, it was unknown if this game would be Tuesday or Wednesday, so I booked Tuesday to Thursday. It meant that I was free on Tuesday evening.

Crewe were scheduled to play Blackburn in an FA Cup 2nd Round Replay. It wasn’t far from Manchester and the ground is easy to get to.

Unfortunately, the match was postponed, but rescheduled for the following day.

I could have went to Burnley or Wigan, but in truth, I couldn’t be bothered.

This was Jose Mourinho’s first home League win against Bournemouth and the first time i’ve been to a United League win of note with him as manager.

My next scheduled trip to Old Trafford is in May for the last game of the season against Watford.

Unfortunately, it’s not looking like a title party.

Photo Album

Manchester United v Bournemouth May 2016

MANCHESTER STREET ART – DECEMBER 2017

Headed over to Manchester for a few days recently, and naturally took the opportunity to get some Street Art photos, as I usually do when I visit.

The last time I visited Manchester was in May. The following day, there was a bomb attack on Manchester Arena.

Street Art was one of the main responses of the city.

Within days, Stevenson Square, one of the main Street Art areas in the Northern Quarter became the canvas of defiance, with the city’s emblem, The Worker Bee, featuring prominently.

From there, I headed to nearby Ancoats to get some pieces that I may have spotted. There was one piece of a bird’s nest which was obscured by parked cars, much to my frustration.

There were some pieces I photographed on my last visit that are now gone, one for an advert and one because of building work.

The city’s main newspaper, Manchester Evening News, sponsored a mural of 22 bees, representing the 22 victims of the bomb attack, on Oldham Street.

On the day I visited, there was no access to the mural as it sits on a disused car park. Unsurprisingly, it was difficult to get decent photos of it.

It seems a shame for such a great and striking piece to be obscured from public view, denying people the chance to visit and see it.

On the Wednesday, I headed back to Stevenson Square to mop up some pieces I missed as there was a TV crew interviewing beside one of them when I was getting photos.

I also got photos of new murals inside Affleck’s.

Thursday saw me head to Oxford Road which usually has a few pieces that I was able to snap.

Photo Album

Manchester Street Art May 2017

Manchester Street Art February 2017

Manchester Street Art November 2016

Manchester Street Art May 2016

Manchester Street Art January 2016

Manchester Street Art November 2015

Manchester Street Art May 2015

Manchester Street Art November 2014