MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – JULY 1999

The summer of 1999 is the focus for this edition of “The Magazine Archive”, looking at Four Four Two and their end of season awards.

Bizarrely, despite winning The Treble, there were no Man United players featured on the cover.

Cheltenham Town’s promotion to the Football League was the subject of parody with a mock tourist brochure being drawn up showcasing the delights of Cheltenham.

A column by Paul Simpson looking at footballing achievements remarks that Man United’s treble still has a long way to go before matching Linfield’s Seven trophies in 1922.

The always funny in retrospect feature “The Boy’s A Bit Special” makes an appearance profiling current Norwich City player Adam Drury, Clinton Morrison, and Seth Johnson, the player often used to personify the transfer excesses at Leeds United under the Peter Ridsdale/David O’Leary.

In the letters page, one reader wrote to express his opinions on the behaviour of players during a recent Old Firm game, and how their actions can affect crowd behaviour.

Given the recent furore about the Scottish Cup Replay between the two sides, it seems some things never change.

Dwight Yorke won the award for “Best Premiership Player” with Didier Domi being ranked 50th.

Kieron Dyer, who that summer signed for Newcastle United was voted best in Division One, while ex Portadown player Peter Kennedy was voted 36th.

In Division Two, then uncapped Northern Ireland players Maik Taylor and Steve Robinson were in the Top Ten.

Kevin Horlock was 41st, 4 places below former Glentoran player Glen Little.

It’s not too hard which goal was voted the best that season. If you haven’t worked it out yet, it was Ryan Giggs goal in the FA Cup Semi-Final Replay.

In the world of advertising, David Seaman, quite appropriately given the name, is advertising Admiral Aportswear.

Four pages are dedicated to the Youth World Cup, held in Africa (Nigeria to be precise) which was won by Spain.

History repeated itself when Spain left Africa with the World Cup trophy 11 years later, this time, the senior trophy.

A quick look through Wikipedia reveals that Iker Casillas, Carlos Marchena and Xavi played for Spain in both tournaments.

There is a feature on English goalkeepers and why there are so few of them.

A chart is made of the goalkeepers at each Premier League club, with comments on the situation.

For Manchester United, the comment reads “Bad news for Nick Culkin as Peter Schmeichel is likely to be replaced by Edwin Van Der Sar”

Van Der Sar did replace Schmeichel, unfortunately, he wasn’t signed until 2005.

The “More Than A Game” feature focused on the Welsh derby between Cardiff City and Swansea City.

In 1999, both clubs were in the bottom division of the Football League in run down stadiums. How times change.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – MAY 1997

In this segment, we look at Four Four Two, from May 1997, which pulled off a bit of a scoop by getting Alex Fergsuon (Not yet Sir Alex) and Kenny Dalglish on their front cover as Manchester United and Newcastle United were challenging for the title, alongside Arsenal and Liverpool.

The Premier League was nearing the end of it’s fifth season, and Ferguson and Dalglish (with Blackburn Rovers) had won the previous four, with Fergie leading 3-1

The Spine Line read “Alex, Matt, Tom, Johnny, Matt, Bill, Bill, George” which I guess might be some reference to Scottish managers in English football, considering Ferguson and Dalglish are on the cover with Matt being Busby, Bill being Shankly and George being Graham.

Recently sacked BBC Five Live presenter Danny Baker gets a page dedicated to him in support.

In the world of advertising, Ben Thatcher and Chris Perry of Wimbledon are advertising Valsport’s multicoloured range of boots.

To appreciate the quality of Valsport, you need to wear them apparantly.

World Cups of the future take up space in the magazine, with two pages bizarrely dedicated to wether England should make a joint bid with Germany to host the 2006 World Cup.

England had just successfully hosted Euro 96 and wanted to exploit this by bidding to host the 2006 World Cup, the next tournament (apart from Euro 2004, but having hosted Euro 96, it is unlikely it would be favourably looked at) that was available to bid for.

Germany had long stated their desire to host World Cup 2006. Viewers of ESPN Classic will note that Premier League grounds had hoardings with “England 2006” written on them.

When it came to the vote in the summer of 2000, it was South Africa, not England, who were Germany’s main rival as England were eliminated in the first round of voting.

Germany edged out South Africa, who eventually won the right to host the 2010 World Cup.

A feature titled “The Odd Couple” looks at the 2002 World Cup to be held in South Korea and Japan, the first time ever the World Cup would be co-hosted.

Despite the much feared tensions between the two host nations, the only confrontation of the 2002 World Cup would be between Mick McCarthy and Roy Keane at the Republic of Ireland training camp.