MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9.4.1977

Paul Mariner, heading goalwards against Bristol City, is the cover star as the 1976-1977 season nears it’s end.

In news, a Leeds United Supporters Club has been created in Ghana, with 50 members. It’s unknown if a young Tony Yeboah was one of those.

Jim Platt could be on the lookout for a move from Middlesbrough, having lost his first-team place, with the lack of games affecting his international chances.

Gordon Hill uses his column to talk about defender, declaring if you combined Martin Buchan, Mick Mills, Kevin Beattie and Colin Todd, you would have the ideal defender.

There was a double page photo spread from the recent League Cup Final between Everton and Aston Villa. There wasn’t much action to photograph, as the match finished 0-0 and went to a replay. It would eventually need a second replay to get a winner, Aston Villa winning 3-2 at Old Trafford.

1977 was the first year that a League Cup Final finished 0-0.

In foreign news, Poland had a training camp in Yugoslavia, with 15 hour training sessions, ahead of their World Cup qualifier against Denmark on 1st May. They won that match 2-1.

It was announced that Helmut Schoen will step down as West Germany manager after the 1978 World Cup and be replaced by his assistant Jupp Derwall, while players Franz Beckenbauer and Berti Vogts have been asked to become coaches with the national team once they retire.

Europe’s three competitions are at the Semi-Final stage, and Shoot uses two pages to preview all six games.

Shoot does a two page feature interviewing and looking at Scottish players who have moved to clubs in England, before returning to Scotland.

Staying in Scotland, there was a full page preview of the Scottish Cup Semi-final between Celtic and Dundee.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1985

Glenn Hoddle of England is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Or perhaps, not of England, if the headline is anything to go by.

This was also the week in Back To The Future II where Marty McFly visits 2015.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Steve McMahon, who has just joined Liverpool from Aston Villa, nearly three years after rejecting Liverpool to go to Villa Park.

Meanwhile, there are reports that England’s top clubs could be forming a breakaway Super League.

Cover star Glenn Hoddle is interviewed, finally becoming an England regular, and is confident of returning home from Mexico the following summer with the World Cup.

The cover headline “I’LL QUIT ENGLAND” refers to his club status, as he expresses his desire to play on the continent, which he did in 1987 when he signed for Monaco.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that Peter Barnes is worthy of a place in the England squad to provide competition for John Barnes and Chris Waddle.

Northern Ireland’s vital World Cup Qualifier away to Romania gets previewed, with manager Billy Bingham confidently predicting that Northern Ireland will finish 2nd in their group and head to Mexico.

Republic Of Ireland also have ambitions of going to Mexico, and have blooded Tony Cascarino into their squad in time for their vital game away to the Soviet Union.

Portsmouth manager Alan Ball gets a photo collage, as he aims to lead the club back to the top flight of English football.

Peter Shilton gets a double page feature as he becomes England’s most capped goalkeeper, complete with a tribute from Gordon Banks, who he replaced at Leicester City, Stoke City and England, with the headline “PETER SHILTON – KING OF KEEPERS”

West Germany manager Franz Beckenabauer feels this season’s European club competitions have been devalued by the absence of English clubs, while Canada have qualified for the World Cup for the first time in their history.

Meanwhile, Napoli failed in their bid to sign Hugo Maradona from Argentinos Juniors, the younger brother of Diego Maradona.

A dispute between the governing body and broadcasters meant that there were no games on TV, so Shoot did a double page photo collage of the best strikes.

In Scotland, there is a full page profile and a poster of Celtic.

In Wales, Mark Hughes was set to miss the opening games of Euro 88 Qualifying, due to a red card in an underage Euro qualifier against Yugoslavia in 1983.

Steve Cowan gets a full page feature, having just signed for Hibs and is hoping to put his injury problems behind him.

Bradford City get featured, as the club tries to recover from the tragic fire at their ground five months earlier.

Peter Reid uses his column to talk about Everton’s problems conceding goals, especially in the early moments of games.

Reid’s Everton team-mate Gary Lineker is happy, having found a Snooker Club near his home in Southport, and has managed to convince Willie Thorne to start supporting Everton.

Meanwhile, Portsmouth are trying to sign Paul Mariner from Arsenal.

The magazine ends with a profile of Davie McPherson of Rangers. His favourite music is Dire Straits and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 24.5.1986

Bryan Robson, in action for England, is the cover star as the 1986 World Cup gets closer.

The magazine opens with rumoured tansfer activity by the Old Firm, with Rangers wanting to sign Richard Gough (he would eventually sign in 1987, after a year at Tottenham Hotspur) from Dundee United and Andy Goram (It took until 1991, from Hibs, for him to join) while Celtic want to sign Stevie Clarke from St Mirren. That is ex Chelsea player and West Brom manager Steve Clarke.

Another Scottish player potentially on the move is John Robertson of Hearts, who has been attracting attention from Tottenham Hotspur.

With the World Cup getting closer, there is a double page spread previewing Poland’s chances.

Canada also get a preview. UK fans will get a glimpse of them before the tournament as they play England in a friendly at a 16,000 capacity venue, due to England manager Bobby Robson insisting that the game be played on grass, and not artificial grass that is used in Canada’s bigger stadiums.

Bryan Robson uses his column to argue the case for England as World Cup winners, giving a brief profile of the 22 players tasked with taking the trophy home from Mexico.

Swindon Town won the 4th division, and this gets a double page spread, with manager Lou Macari giving most of the credit to defender Colin Calderwood.

Also promoted and getting a double page spread were Norwich City.

In World Cup news, Socrates was left out of Brazil’s friendly against East Germany, while West Germany manager Franz Beckenbauer says this World Cup has come too soon for his team, but they have a great chance of winning the trophy in 1990.

The centre page poster is of AC Milan’s English duo of Ray Wilkins and Mark Hateley, settling in in Italy, complete with family portraits. Former Motherwell player Tom Hately wasn’t pictured, because he wasn’t born until 1989.

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to discuss the vacant manager’s position at Arsenal, suggesting that his preference is Alex Ferguson or Billy McNeill.

John Fashanu gets a full page profile, described as “articulate TV and radio star who listens to Dire Straits and Phil Collins”. His biggest ambition is to appear on The Cosby Show. Fashanu would be going to the World Cup in Mexico as a pundit for Nigerian TV. Fashanu describes himself as “Mean and nasty”

The magazine goes green for a few pages, with features on Northern Ireland and Plymouth Argyle.

There was an advert for the following week’s edition, which had a World Cup wallchart.

It was a World Cup that Trevor Francis won’t be playing. He tells Shoot of his disappointment of not being selected for England, and that he’s not planning on leaving Italy, where he is currently based.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.6.1986

Action from the opening game of Mexico 86 between Bulgaria and Italy is on the cover of Shoot, as they bring you the latest news from the ongoing World Cup.

England are hoping to win it for the first time since 1966, and their winning captain that day, Bobby Moore, is now a columnist for Shoot, and he lists the players that have impressed him in the opening games, such as Socrates, Maradona, Platini, Papin, Boniek, as well as Randy Regan and Bruce Wilson of Canada.

Bryan Robson is hoping to emulate his fellow Shoot columnist by lifting the trophy, but it hasn’t got off to the best of starts, as he writes of his frustration of England failing to win their first two games, but predicts England will reach the knock out stages. Beside his column is an advert for New Balance, which he endorses.

There is a double page interview with Jim Leighton, where he reveals that he didn’t want to be a goalkeeper.

News from Mexico includes that Fenerbache made approached Franz Beckenbauer to quit West Germany and become manager of Fenerbache, while in Italy, there is a potential match fixing scandal about to blow open.

Italy’s group opponents Bulgaria haven’t made many friends, by holding training behind closed doors and having armed guards outside their training facilities.

Shoot’s man in Mexico, Bill Day brands England’s performances “A disgrace”, while being complimentary about Northern Ireland, despite losing 2-1 to Spain.

Ray Daly from County Offaly writes to Jimmy Greaves to suggest that when Ron Atkinson’s inevitable departure as Manchester United manager is confirmed, the job should go to United legend Lou Macari.

There is a round-up of results from the 1985-1986 Scottish League seasons, with Steve Cowan of Hibs being top scorer, 2 ahead of Brian McClair. Both men would go on to win league titles outside their native country, Cowan with Portadown and McClair with Manchester United.

Outside of the World Cup, Republic Of Ireland are making progress under Jack Charlton, already lifting a trophy by winning a triangular tournament in Iceland against the hosts and Czechoslovakia.

Steve Hodge gets a full page profile having broken into the England squad in time to head to Mexico. A potential Aston Villa team-mate of Hodge’s is John Hewitt, in a contract dispute with Aberdeen, which gets a full page feature. Discussions are on hold at the moment, due to Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson being in Mexico in his role as Scotland manager.

Nigel Winterburn of Wimbledon, looking forward to playing in the top flight for the first time, gets a full page interview, where he credits his former manager at Birmingham, Jim Smith, with saving his career.

There is also a full page profile of League of Ireland champions Shamrock Rovers.

In club news, Alex Ferguson spoke of his dislike for agents after Eric Black moved to Metz, while Liam Brady was leaving unsubtle hints for Arsenal to buy him back.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – NOVEMBER 1998

An expensively assembled team in Sky Blue are featured on the cover of this edition of World Soccer, but it’s not Manchester City, it’s Lazio.

In Jersey, there is an experiment taking place where a referee can move a free-kick forward ten yards if a defending player shows dissent or engages in unsporting behaviour.

In this edition, World Soccer has an article on satellite channels and receivers that can pick up football from around the world. One of those clubs you could watch, is Anderlecht, who get a page feature about their recent downturn in form.

Drugs were a major issue this month, with rumours of failed tests in Serie A being covered up, and one journalist suggesting that referees should be subject to random testing like players.

There is an article based on a quote from Ray Clemence that there are too many foreign goalkeepers in England, looking at the shotstoppers of the twenty Premier League clubs, noting that the two most promising English prospects, Steve Simonsen and Richard Wright, are playing outside the top flight.

Lazio get a four page profile, having spent £70m to try and win the Serie A title. They did manage it in 2000, but not since. One of those player in the expensively assembled sky blue outfit ……. was Roberto Mancini.

Two of those pages are used for an interview with Christian Vieri, who left Lazio the following summer in a big money move, becoming the world’s most expensive player when he signed for Inter Milan.

German football is in crisis with the departure of Berti Vogts as national team manager, and the DFB being rebuffed, for various reasons, in their attempts to appoint Otto Rehhagel, Christoph Daum, Jupp Heynckes, Franz Beckenbauer, Ottmar Hitzfeld, Roy Hodgson and Paul Breitner, before eventually settling on Erich Ribbeck.

Davor Suker, top scorer at the summer’s World Cup gets a double page profile, while Croatia’s Euro 2000 Qualifying opponents, Yugoslavia, get a double page spread.

It’s not just Germany who had a change in manager, the departure of Spain manager Javier Clemente after a 3-2 defeat to Cyprus in their opening Euro 2000 Qualifier got a double page spread. He was immediately replaced by Jose Antonia Camacho.

Across the border in France, Vikash Dhorasoo gets a full page feature, as the most exciting prospect in French football.

Back in Germany, Keir Radnedge reports on the success of the two Munich clubs, currently first and second in the Bundesliga.

In England, Aston Villa are top with an almost all English team (Mark Bosnich from Australia being the only foreigner in their regular starting eleven) and have money to spend following the sale of Dwight Yorke. World Soccer suggest that money could be used to bid on another English player, Andy Cole of Manchester United.

A former manager of Cole, George Graham, has new employment, as manager of Tottenham Hotspur, a move that has divided the club’s fans, given his long association with Arsenal.

In Scotland, Marco Negri is in dispute with Rangers, with manager Dick Advocaat accusing him of lying to the media about his transfer situation.

Northern Ireland’s news is dominated by the resurgence of Linfield and Glentoran, looking to win their first title in 5 and 7 years respectively, but already pulling away from the chasing pack at the top of the table.

Also in dispute with their club like Marco Negri, was future Rangers players Frank and Ronald De Boer, who want to leave for Barcelona.

Bruce Grobbelaar made a comeback of sorts, playing for Zimbabwe at the age of 41, as well as being part of their coaching staff.

Brian Glanville uses his column to question Alex Ferguson’s record in the European Cup and World Cup, in the aftermath of a TV documentary where he referred to Paul Ince as “A big time charlie”

Glanville also uses his column to question the wisdom of those who want Terry Venables to return as England manager following England’s poor start to Euro 2000 qualification.