MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.8.1989

It’s the kick-off of the 1989-1990 season, and Shoot’s famous League Ladders poster, which came free with this edition, is the cover image.

The magazine opens with Bryan Robson’s column, where is confident that Manchester United can win the title, and believes his side are ready to show their credentials against reigning champions Arsenal on the opening day of the season.

He also touches on the World Cup in Italy, coming up at the end of the season, predicting that it will be won by a European team and that England aren’t far off.

Shoot itself gets a feature. The reason for the trumpet blowing? Shoot had just celebrated it’s 20th anniversary.

Real Madrid have signed a young player, but in tragic circumstances, symbolically signing one year old Sergio Cunningham, after the death of his dad, former Real Madrid player Lawrie Cunningham.

Terry Butcher showed off his drumming skills in Stirling recently for the band Tonto. Shoot describes Butcher as a self confessed head banger who lists Iron Maiden as his favourite band.

Theo Snelders tells Shoot of his determination to get back into the Holland squad after being controversially dropped after the manager said he was too scared to play against Germany.

John Fashanu has just joined Shoot and uses his debut column to put an end to rumours that he wants to leave Wimbledon.

In posters, you can get one of new Everton signing Norman Whiteside, while Gazza advertises Brooks boots.

Graham Roberts uses his column to reveal the reason why he left Rangers to join Chelsea – a dressing room falling out with manager Graeme Souness.

In news, The Football League is negotiating for the use of Wembley Stadium for the Play-Off Finals.

John Robertson tells Shoot that he is glad to have rejoined Hearts from Newcastle United, believing it will be a boost to his chances of going to the World Cup if Scotland qualify.

Shoot isn’t the only one celebrating a milestone birthday, Match of the Day turns 25 and gets a full page feature.

Jimmy Greaves predicts how he things the league table will look in 1990, predicting Liverpool to take the title back from Arsenal, with Charlton, Luton and Southampton getting relegated.

Jan Molby gets a full page interview, telling Shoot he is desperate to become a regular starter for Liverpool again, and win back his place in Denmark’s squad.

Kevin Gallacher gets a double page profile, where he reveals Deacon Blue are one of his favourite bands, and met Ricky Ross at a concert for Paul Sturrock’s testimonial, and that Ross was more nervoud of meeting Dundee united players than they were of meeting him.

There is a full page feature on Gerry Francis, who is remaining loyal to Bristol Rovers despite financial troubles at the club, but warns they won’t have any success in the future unless they get a new stadium, with the club playing at Twerton Park in Bath.

Ray Wilkins has just rejoined Rangers, and has hit back at suggestions that English players who join the Ibrox club (Wilkins was the 13th to do so under Graeme Souness) are jeopardising their international career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.5.1977

David O’Leary is one of the cover stars as the 1976-1977 nears it’s finale.

Jack Charlton (Middlesbrough) and Johnny Giles (West Bromwich Albion) get a double page feature, as the two former Leeds players have left managerial positions in recent weeks.

Ray Kennedy gets a full page profile, as he aims to make English football history, aiming to become the first player to win the double twice, having been a part of Arsenal’s 1971 double winning team.

With Liverpool losing to Manchester United in that year’s FA Cup Final, the feat wasn’t achieve until various Manchester United players did it in 1996, with some more doing it in 1999 (Peter Schmeichel, Denis Irwin, Roy Keane and Ryan Giggs winning it three times)

Ashley Cole and Nicholas Anelka are the only players to win the double with two different clubs, after Kennedy was denied this achievement.

Shoot does a double page spread, offering Martin Peters, Pat Rice and Howard Kendall an opportunity to reflect on the season, and why their respective sides didn’t win a trophy.

Gerry Francis uses his column to suggest that anybody wanting to be a manager in England should get the relevant coaching and management qualifications, similar to the structure in West Germany.

In news, Arsenal manager Terry Neill has denied a story in Shoot that Frank Stapleton and Liam Brady are on their way to Liverpool. Middlesbrough midfielder Graeme Souness is unsettled at Ayresome Park

St Mirren manager Alex Ferguson has been fined £25 for comments to the referee after his side were eliminated from the Scottish Cup by Motherwell.

Aston Villa goalkeeper John Burridge gets a full page profile about facing penalties.

In the centre pages, there is a poster of the Aston Villa team, including the League Cup, which they won in 1977.

John Greig uses his column to explain why Rangers didn’t win the league.

Sheffield Wednesday’s teenage goalkeeper Chris Turner gets interviewed, having broke into the team and become a regular of the team he supported growing up.

In world news, Idi Amin is described as “The Generous General”, having rewarded the national team with a free holiday in Libya as a reward for winning the East African Challenge Cup.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT : 12.2.1977

England’s upcoming friendly against Holland dominates the cover of this edition of Shoot, with Ruud Krol and Trevor Brooking occupying the page.

In news, Republic Of Ireland have arranged a friendly against Poland, but may have to field locally based players due to the club commitments of players based in England. Dundee United were invited on a pre-season tour of Bangladesh.

Alex Stepney has been awarded a testimonial by Manchester United, with Benfica, United’s opponents in the 1968 European Cup Final, visiting Old Trafford. It’s part of a series of events, including a concert by Brotherhood Of Man at Fagin’s Club in Manchester.

The big boys joined the Irish Cup this week, with Linfield hoping to win the trophy for the 31st time. They would have to wait until 1978 to reach that milestone.

Birmingham City manager Willie Bell wanted 1977 British Championship postponed in order to avoid player burnout, due to backlog of club games due to postponements, and England and Scotland going on tour to South America.

England’s friendly with Holland gets a double page spread. The match was the first between the sides since a friendly seven years earlier, a 0-0 draw at Wembley with England months away from heading to Mexico to defend their World Cup title. Shoot focused on the change in fortunes for both countries since then, with Holland reaching the 1974 World Cup Final, a tournament which England failed to qualify for.

Kevin Keegan uses his column to comment that England must deliver a good performance in order to ensure fans keep returning to Wembley to watch them.

Shoot gives a full page to a bit of statistical fun, that Millwall have the best goals conceded ratio in the history of the Football League from 1888 to 1977.

Gerry Francis also uses his column to preview the England v Holland game, suggesting that Holland are a better team without their star players.

Alan Sunderland told Shoot that he was glad to be settled in a striker role at Wolves, while Graham Wilkins of Chelsea was talking about emerging from the shadow of his younger brother Ray.

In world news, West German clubs are raking in money from shirt sponsorship, which is still banned in England.

Cesar Luis Menotti, manager of World Cup hosts Argentina, is interviewed, where he revealed that the fear of disappointing Argentina’s fans is giving him sleepless nights.

John Greig uses his column to reveal that Rangers might be making a sensational new signing – former Brentford trialist Rod Stewart, who has approached him about playing for Rangers in his testimonial.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.9.1979

Nottingham Forest winger John Robertson, pictured holding the European Cup, is the cover star accompanied by the headline “CAN FOREST RETAIN THE EUROPEAN CUP?”, as Europe’s three competitions are getting ready to swing into action.

The biggest threat to Forest’s grip on the trophy, in Robertson’s opinion, came from Liverpool, who he said he hope would get put out early, but admitted the two teams playing in the final would be great for English football.

As it turned out, Liverpool had an early exit, a First Round exit to Soviet team Dinamo Tblisi, while Forest would go on and retain the trophy, beating Hamburg 1-0 in Madrid.

Turning over the page, Shoot does a full page feature on the chances of the British sides in their ties, against a various mix of opponents.

In news, Alan Ball Snr (father of 1966 World Cup winner of the same name) is singing the praises of Scandinavian players as representing value for English clubs, having just spent three years coaching in Sweden.

Colin Bell of Manchester City announced his retirement aged 33.

Lawrie McMenemy expressed his fears of a “Super League” emerging within England’s top flight, due to the spending power of some clubs.

Brian Quinn moved from Larne to Everton for £60,000 – a record between clubs from Northern Ireland and England, and is aiming to be the 10th Everton player to play for Northern Ireland since World War II, just short of the 14 players supplied by joint record holders Manchester United and Linfield.

Alex Sabella turned down a move from Sheffield United …….. because his wife wasn’t keen on living in the North-East.

Motherwell manager Ally MacLeod is to be investigated by the SFA after publishing a book claiming that Willie Johnston wasn’t the only Scotland player to have taken illegal substances at the previous summer’s World Cup.

In his column, Ray Clemence is looking forward to his first trip to the Soviet Union, for Liverpool’s European Cup tie with Dinamo Tblisi.

Shoot does a full page feature on the West Country, interviewing a player from Plymouth Argyle, Exeter City and Torquay United on the future of football in the area.

Dave Watson, recently signed for Werder Bremen, was sent off in his second game for the club, and bemoans the strictness of German referees, while also dismissing criticism of his signing by German newspaper Bild.

Andy Gray hits back after being booed by Aston Villa fans after requesting a transfer, and was upset by Villa holding out for £1m, stating no player is worth that amount (though Trevor Francis was earlier that year)

Later that month, Gray signed for Wolves for £1.5m

There was a four page feature on Manchester City, including a double page colour poster.

Tommy Docherty is in fighting form, proclaiming “I’m still one of the best”, and that he is happy with his summer spending having spent £1m on five players, including England Under 21 goalkeeper Chris Woods.

Docherty had been sacked by Manchester United two years previously due to an extramarital affair, and was hoping his spell at Loftus Road would propel him back into the big time.

QPR finished 5th in Division Two (no play-offs then, only the top 3 went up) and Docherty was sacked, before being reinstated, than sacked again in October 1980.

“Life has never been happier at the aptly named Gay Meadow” writes Shoot, presumably in The Flintstones sense, as manager Graham Turner has just led them into England’s second tier for the first time.

Shoot gives a page to Ian Redford, a star at Dundee described as “The new Alan Gilzean”

Redford joined Rangers in 1980 for a Scottish record, won four trophies at Ibrox, and played for Dundee United in the 1987 UEFA Cup Final. Redford died in January 2014, aged 53.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to claim that he scored United’s goal against Southampton on the opening day of the season, which was credited as an own goal, and denies rumours that Mickey Thomas was to be sold to Everton in an exchange for Dave Thomas.

On the back page, there was a colour poster of new Crystal Palace signings Gerry Francis and Mike Flanagan.