MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 30.4.1988

Luton Town are the cover stars of Shoot, as the 1988 League Cup Final gets reviewed.

Luton’s 3-2 win over Arsenal gets three pages of coverage, with a full page dedicated to penalty save hero Andy Dibble, who is attracting transfer interest after deputising for the injured Les Sealey.

Also celebrating a trophy win are newly crowned League Champions Liverpool, which gets a full page feature.

Norman Whiteside looks set to leave Manchester United after a contract dispute. Whiteside also has a go at Jimmy Hill for his scrutinising of tackles by non English players in the aftermath of criticism by Hill of a tackle by Whiteside during a recent game at Anfield.

Shoot prints out a handy guide for the Football League Play-Offs, in their second season.

John Barnes uses his column to pay tribute to Peter Beardsley.

Talking of Peter Beardsley, he is modelling the new England kit for Euro 88.

And talking of Euro 88, there is a four page profile of Spain.

In world news, Inter Milan want to sign Lothar Matthaus, while FIFA are threatening to take the 1990 World Cup away from Italy and award it to West Germany after the preparations have fallen behind schedule.

There is a double page feature on two teenage players who have broken through in Division One – Michael O’Neill and Alan Shearer.

Rangers fans who love dogs were in for a treat as Shoot do a feature on Ally McCoist and Graham Roberts love of dogs.

Bryan Gunn gets interviewed and tells Shoot that Norwich players are responsible for the poor run of form that saw the departure of manager Ken Brown.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which has a free Euro 88 sticker book.

The magazine ends with a feature on John Charles Testimonial Match, which saw Ian Rush and Michel Platini make guest appearances for Leeds United, though Rush would go on to sign for Leeds eight years later.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.12.1989

Peter Beardsley, playing for England, is the cover star of Match, as England, Scotland and Republic Of Ireland have discovered their group opponents in the 1990 World Cup.

1989-1990 has been a season of violence on the pitch in English football, with Sports Minister Colin Moynihan calling for players who misbehave to be arrested. Bryan Robson and Terry Butcher hit back against such a suggestion.

England and Republic Of Ireland face each other in the 1990 World Cup groups, having met in Euro 88, while Scotland also face familiar opponents, Brazil, who they met in the 1982 World Cup group stages.

Gary Shaw, currently playing in Austria, is hoping to return to the Football League, but is still struggling from the effects of a knee injury.

Ajax are eyeing up English clubs for potential friendlies as they are currently serving a UEFA ban.

One English club playing a high profile friendly is Arsenal, who travel to Ibrox to take on Rangers in an Unofficial British Championship, with Arsenal midfielder Brian Marwood saying this match is an opportunity to enhance Arsenal’s reputation.

There is a feature on competition winners who got to meet the England team.

John MacPhail of Sunderland tells Shoot he still has the legs to take part in Sunderland’s promotion battle at the age of 34.

Talking on veterans, there is a full page profile of QPR’s midfield duo of Ray Wilkins and Peter Reid, both well into their 30s.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 12.5.1990

Later today, Alan Pardew will lead out Crystal Palace for the FA Cup Final. In 1990, he was playing for Crystal Palace, appearing on the cover of Match with current Stoke City manager Mark Hughes, then a Manchester United player, with the FA Cup sandwiched inbetween them.

As you open the magazine, Mark Bright is interviewed, urging Crystal Palace to make him a contract offer he can’t refuse, amid speculation over his future.

Across the page, Gary Pallister is interviewed, stating the the FA Cup offers a lifeline to a disappointing season for both him and United.

In traditional cup final fashion, the teams get profiled by a team-mate, Gary O’Reilly for Palace and Mike Phelan for United.

Phelan reveals that Steve Bruce is known as “Empty head” due to knowing a lot of useless facts, and Paul Ince is known as “Mr Quote” due to his love of speaking to the press.

In news, Ronnie Rosenthal states he won’t be returning to Standard Liege for the following season, with Liverpool, where he on loan, being his preferred destination.

It’s also Cup Final Day in Scotland, where Celtic face Aberdeen, and this gets a double page profile.

With the World Cup in Italy approaching, Match looks at those players with ambitions of being on the plane, and the choices Bobby Robson has to make.

Ally McCoist gets a profile, where he reveals a fondness for Brooke Shields, a fear of Spiders, and that his favourite thing about Match is photos of Ally McCoist.

In Match Facts, 18 year old Mark Bosnich made what Match described as a “reasonable” debut for Manchester United in a 0-0 draw with Wimbledon.

In their foreign round-up, Napoli win Serie A, but their star player Diego Maradona wants to leave and join Marseille.

As part of their World Cup preview, South Korea get a double page profile.

The magazine ends with a double page profile on Paul Gascoigne, as Match assesses his performance against Czechoslovakia in one of England’s warm-up games.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.7.1986

Diego Maradona, held aloft, carrying the World Cup trophy is the cover star of Shoot, as they look back at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

The editor’s page though, looks at the organisation of the tournament, criticising the standard of sound/pictures on the TV coverage, state of the pitches and standard of refereeing.

Elsewhere on the page, he bemoaned the number of British players now playing abroad, asking if stars like Frank McAvennie or Kenny Sansom will be next.

In a recurring theme from 1986 onwards, Bryan Robson has just come out of surgery, and his ready to return for Manchester United, while also appearing in an advert for New Balance boots.

England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s exploits in Mexico didn’t go unnoticed, as the three teams had a centre page poster, featuring a collage of match action from their games, with the headline ‘THEY DID US PROUD’

There is a free pull-out of a review of the competition, complete with match statistics and line-ups from every game.

Line 7 is another boot manufacturer having an advert in this issue, with France midfielder Jean-Marc Ferreri as their Brand Ambassador.

The tagline in the ad says “Jean-Marc Ferreri scored the equalising goal that helped France secure third place in the World Cup”

I’m no marketing expert, but I think that might need a bit of work.

There were three pages dedicated to an unseen victory for England at the 1986 World Cup, learning from their errors at the 1970 World Cup where they weren’t so open to the Mexican public.

FA Press Officer Glen Kirton used his A-Level Spanish to Liaise with locals, making sure that England’s time in Mexico ran smoothly.

It was pointed out that they had checked out training venues and hotels in Mexico in 1983, as well as a South American tour (1984) and Mexico friendlies (1985) the following summers, as well as players meeting and greeting locals while in Mexico.

During the tournament, players had a lot of free time. Gary Bailey spent most of his time reading a book or listening to his Ghetto Blaster.

England players made the most of movies lent to them by CBS.

Gary Lineker was the king of the pool table, though Glenn Hoddle gave him a run for his money. Hoddle was described as “Like John McEnroe, minus the fiery temper”

David McCreery gets a full page dedicated to him, as he is interviewed about his experiences of the tournament, having been described as Northern Ireland’s player of the tournament by manager Billy Bingham.

A third boot advert, this time Hi-Tec, endorsed by Peter Reid, Steve McMahon and Emlyn Hughes. The boot of Scousers.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, one reader asks if Greavsie thinks Bobby Robson is the right man to lead England. Greavsie speaks up in support of Robson, and was proved right as England reached the Semi-finals in 1990.

Niki Corrigan from Hartlepool writes in to say that Diego Maradona will be remembered as a cheat.

Denmark star Michael Laudrup is the subject of a player profile. He supports Liverpool and Leeds, and his favourite bands are : Wham, ELO, Stevie Wonder and Duran Duran.

His long-term ambition was to play for Denmark in the 1990 World Cup Finals in Italy. Unfortunately, Denmark didn’t qualify.

Having had three boot adverts, there was room for one more advert, but it was Uhlsport, for gloves, featuring some of the world’s best goalkeepers such as Pat Jennings, Walter Zenga, Peter Shilton, Joel Bats, and um …… Jim Platt of Coleraine.