MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 1.3.1986

Celtic and Manchester United are on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot as they prepare to face each other in a mid-season friendly, with the headline “Soccer on trial”.

The headline refers to the fact that it was the first high profile away game by an English club since the previous season’s European Cup Final, which resulted in English clubs being banned from Europe.

As you open the magazine, Danny Wallace fires a message to John Barnes and Chris Waddle that he is after their World Cup place following an impressive England debut in a recent friendly away to Egypt.

The friendly at Parkhead that featured on the cover gets a double page spread, with the game billed as an unofficial British Cup Winners Cup Final, after both teams won their respective national cup competitions in 1985.

Paul McStay of Celtic suggests that a former Rangers player might have a keen interest in this game, as Scotland manager Alex Ferguson might take the opportunity to spy on Jesper Olsen of United, with Denmark being a group opponent of Scotland in the forthcoming World Cup.

In ads, you can buy The Official FA Cup Game for just £7.75 on Spectrum, Commodore or Armstrad.

Talking of adverts, England’s squad has agreed a sponsorship deal with the Health Education Council to front an anti-smoking campaign.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise Peter Beardsley, who recently made his international debut during that recent friendly in Egypt.

Northern Ireland are also in international action, with an away friendly against France, with the game getting a double page feature, with John McClelland being interviewed.

Shoot looks at the options for Scotland’s squad, and they urge Alex Ferguson to find a place for Pat Nevin in the 22.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs youngster Gordon Hunter gets praised by his manager John Blackley.

Phil Thompson is interviewed, where he states that if he could lead Sheffield United into the top flight, it would be as big a thrill as all the trophies he won with Liverpool.

Across Sheffield, Wednesday striker Carl Shutt gets a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves awards his Wally Of The Week Award to Nick Gregory from Banbury, who states that Oxford United are the best team in England.

In Spain, Terry Venables is eyeing up a move to Tottenham Hotspur, but he could be replaced at Barcelona by another British manager, John Toshack of Real Sociedad.

Andy King is interviewed where he expresses his frustration at not getting much action at Luton Town.

Jack Charlton, newly appointed Republic Of Ireland manager, has a big decision to make, as he might have to drop 30 year olds Liam Brady, Frank Stapleton and Tony Grealish.

Charlton has faced some resentment for his appointment due to not being Irish, but also shock that he got the job ahead of Bob Paisley.

Much loved referee Clive Thomas comments on the number of penalties missed in recent years, pointing the finger at his fellow referees for allowing keepers to steal yards.

Craig Levein of Hearts gets a profile as he dreams of a World Cup place, just a few years after almost quitting football to work in an Electronics Factory.

The upcoming Merseyside Derby gets a double page feature, with contributions from Peter Reid and Steve McMahon.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Channon. His favourite music is Paul McCartney, Elton John and Rod Stewart.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.12.1983

Jesper Olsen, in an Ajax kit doing keep-uppeys, is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Despite wearing an Ajax kit, he’s very much a Manchester United player, having just signed for the club.

The headline desribes him as “United’s new George Best” – No pressure there.

United’s purchase of Olsen, in the week that Notts County couldn’t afford to sign Glenn Roeder is used as evidence in an editorial that a breakaway Super League of England’s top club beckons.

Olsen helped Denmark reach Euro 84 at the expense of England. 1966 World Cup winner Alan Ball speaks to Shoot about what England can do to win the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, suggesting that England should start throwing young players into international games.

Olsen wouldn’t be wearing a United shirt until the summer of 1984, as he’d be seeing out the season at Ajax, with Bryan Robson using his column to compare him to George Best, and urging United fans to keep a close eye on him when Denmark are playing in the European Championship in France.

England might not be heading to the finals in France, but Wales have a chance, and their qualifier against Yugoslavia is previewed. A win for Wales would send them to France.

The match finished 1-1, which meant they had to hope Yugoslavia fail to beat Bulgaria, but the Yugoslavs won it with an injury time winner.

If Wales were dreaming of France, Scotland weren’t, with a dismal campaign which saw them finish bottom of a group containing Belgium, East Germany and Switzerland.

Scotland were now looking to the 1986 World Cup Qualifiers, and that began with a British Championship game at Windsor Park against Northern Ireland, a side who Jock Stein has failed to beat as Scotland manager.

In competitions, Shoot were giving away a trip to the European Championship in France. The Subbutteo European Championship that is.

In club football, Dennis Mortimer speaks to Shoot about his return to the Aston Villa team, and how it has given him a new lease of life.

Paul Mariner is interviewed by Shoot, telling them that he fears he is played his last England game, having just turned 30, and how he revels on the verbal abuse he receives from oppositions fans.

It’s not just the 1986 World Cup that people are looking forward to, as England have submitted a bid to host the 1990 World Cup. They fear they have been upstage by Italy, who sent a delegation to FIFA HQ, while Greece sent a Telex, and Soviet Union hand delivered theirs.

Paolo Rossi has been fined £1,400 by authorities in Italy for the crime of wearing the national shirt without permission, after wearing it in an advert for sunglasses.

Another star with money problems was Diego Maradona, who had to pay £4,000 on excess baggage on a flight back home to Buenos Aires.

Raymond Goethels, manager of Standard Liege, predicts that Dundee United will win the European Cup in 1984.

Staying with Scottish teams, Rangers defender John McClelland is a guest columnist, and he declares that Mark McGhee is his toughest opponent.

Gary Mabbutt is another guest columnist, and he praises his young Tottenham team-mate Ally Dick.

Kenny Dalglish’s column focuses on Scotland’s visit to Windsor Park, saddened that this is the last season of the British Championship.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 28.5.1983

It’s Cup Final Day in England and Scotland, but it’s the English game that is on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot, as Brighton take on Manchester United at Wembley.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread with Bryan Robson, Jimmy Case and Michael Robinson giving their thoughts on the game, with Robson wanting to win the cup for Remi Moses, who was suspended for he game, alongside Steve Foster of Brighton.

There is also a double page interview with the two managers, Ron Atkinson and Jimmy Melia, both Scousers.

There is a feature on the two referees in London and Glasgow, with David Syme achieving a rare double, referee the Scottish Cup Final 16 years after his dad did.

In ads, you could buy a Paolo Rossi branded boot, made by Pony.

In posters, the centre page spread is a poster collage of Manchester United and Brighton players.

Gary Shaw previews the European Cup Final between Juventus (who eliminated holders Aston Villa) and Hamburg, with Shaw predicting a win for Juventus, and addressing rumours of a move for him and Gordon Cowans to Italy, stating he is well suited to continental football.

Shaw also previews the FA Cup Final, stating he wants United to win, only because it would secure a UEFA Cup place for Aston Villa.

Staying in the West Midlands, West Brom’s Dutch duo of Romeo Zondervan and Martin Jol being annoyed about their exile from the national team, and declaring that the standard of football in England is better than in Holland. Jol speaks about Holland’s best young players, including Frank Rijkaard, stating “He would only last one game in England, he twists and turns too much and holds the ball too long”

1983 was the year Everton won the league …….. for Liverpool, with a 2-0 win over Manchester United at Goodison Park which ended United’s title challenge, with Everton defender Mark Higgins believing the club are on the verge of making a serious challenge in future years to send the title to the blue half, rather than the red half of Merseyside.

Another Blue (of the Manchester variety) hoping for a big future was Alex Williams, who had a breakthrough season at Manchester City, and was setting his sights on being England’s goalkeeper.

It wasn’t a World Cup year, but there was news about the competition this week, with the official film of the 1982 tournament being broadcast on TV after cinemas in the country deemed it too expensive to show., while Toluca was rejected as a host city for Mexico 86 sue to security fears.

From the World Cup to the British Championship, Northern Ireland head to Hampden Park looking to get their first win in 7 visits. A more prouder record, is Sammy McIlroy, who has played in Northern Ireland’s last 22 games and is looking to continue that run.

There was also coverage of the Scottish Cup Final, with a poster of Aberdeen and Rangers, and interviews with John McClelland, Peter McCloy and Jim Leighton.