MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1981

Liam Brady, sipping from a bottle of water (a glass bottle as well, no health and safety in them days), is the cover star of Shoot, as he adjusts to life in Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Brady, who has so far been a resounding success at Juventus.

In a bid to improve their style of play, Coventry City have banned their players from passing the ball back to their goalkeeper, while the National Hairdressers Federation have voted Lawrie McMenemy as Head Of The Year, alongside Felicity Kendall.

Derek Johnstone uses his column to comment on how Rangers have missed European football in 1980-1981, and are desperate for it to return to Ibrox in 1981-1982, as he reflects on his favourite memories taking on continental opposition.

Another Scotsman with a column is Andy Gray, who states that he is baffled by Wolves recent poor form.

The recent PFA Awards get covered, as John Wark wins Player Of The Year, and Gary Shaw wings Young Player Of The Year.

Ray Clemence’s column analyses the recent League Cup Final between Liverpool and West Ham, which finished 1-1, with a replay due to be played at Villa Park this week. That match gets profiled a few pages over.

Shoot profiles two former England players trying to have success as a manager, Larry Lloyd of Wigan and Norman Hunter of Barnsley, while new Bristol City goalkeeper Jan Moller says he wants to be as good as Peter Shilton, the goalkeeper at the opposition end of the pitch in the 1979 European Cup Final.

Another foreigner in England getting profiled is Bosco Jankovic of Middlesbrough, whose contract is expiring, and he has decide wether to stay in England or return to Yugoslavia.

Diego Maradona gets a profile after becoming the world’s first Ā£4m player when he moved from Argentinos to Boca Juniors.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to write about three young strikers at Manchester United he believes will be big stars in the future – Norman Whiteside, Mark Hughes and Scott McGarvey. Two out of three ain’t bad.

Four footballing figures get interviewed on how to improve the game. West Bromwich Albion manager Ron Atkinson is not in favour of Sunday football, but is in favour of three points for a win.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve Moran of Southampton, who reveals that his favourite music is Mike Oldfield and Diana Ross.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JULY 2003

The summer of 2003 is the latest subject in The Magazine Archive, a time when AC Milan were European Champions and France was getting ready to host the Confederations Cup.

The front cover image is of Paolo Maldini holding aloft the European Cup trophy after a penalty shoot-out win over Juventus at Old Trafford as red and black confetti rains down.

The first six pages are dedicated to reviewing the European Cup Final between AC Milan and Juventus.

Quite how they managed to get six pages out of a dour 0-0 draw, I don’t know.

Eight pages are dedicated to looking at football finances, in a month when it was announced that Real Madrid were the world’s richest football club.

Of the Top 20, 11 had won the European Cup.

Also in the Top 20, 10 of them were British (8 English, 2 Scottish) including 13th place (Unlucky for some you could say) Leeds United, who were relegated from the Premier League.

Newcastle United, ranked 15th, were relegated from the Premier League in 2009.

The Confederations Cup gets six pages of coverage, the same as the European Cup Final.

The editorial for the preview questions the merits of the competition, both in terms of workload on players, and the credibility of a competition, which is a poor cousin to the World Cup, and various continental competitions.

Sadly, the competiton is now best remembered because Cameroon midfielder Marc Vivien Foe collapsed and died during a match against Colombia.

Not to be forgotten, the 2003 UEFA Cup Final between Celtic and Porto got three pages of coverage, as Porto won 3-2, before winning the European Cup a year later.

In the round-ups from around the countries, England’s focuses on the battle for supremacy between Arsenal and Manchester United, as Arsenal retained their FA Cup, but lost the league to United.

A year later, the trophies were reversed. In October 2004, United ended Arsenal’s 49 game unbeaten run with a 2-0 win at Old Trafford, before United secured a double over their North London rivals in the return fixture, a game that saw Roy Keane and Patrick Vieira square up in the tunnel pre-match.

Arsenal had the last laugh that season, beating United in a penalty shoot-out in the FA Cup Final, Arsenal’s last trophy.

The emergence of Chelsea from 2004 onwards has meant that the United-Arsenal rivalry has become dormant, in comparison with it’s peak from 1997-2005.

Amongst the players who are profiled in this edition is Eric Djemba-Djemba of Nantes, who is described as “the latest up and coming talent in Le Championnat to be linked with a move to a big European club, with Juventus, Valencia and Manchester United all said to be interested in him”

He did eventually end up at United that summer, before being offloaded to Aston Villa in January 2005.

He currently plays for Odense in Denmark. That’s probably not where World Soccer would have imagined one of the most sought after players of 2003 to be playing in 2011.