MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 1.7.1989

Gary Lineker is the cover star of Match, as he makes a return to England after three years in Barcelona, signing for Tottenham Hotspur.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on the transfer, with Lineker turning down moves to Everton and Monaco when deciding to sign for Spurs. There is also a mock diary, done in the style of Adrian Mole’s diary.

There is a double page feature on another England striker, Steve Bull, who scored more hat-tricks (four) than any other player in English football in 1988-1989.

Strikers were very much a theme of this issue, with a full page profile of Everton’s new signing Mike Newell, who has a point to prove after being rejected by Liverpool as a youngster.

A Striker who isn’t moving anywhere is Brian McClair, who uses his column to deny he will be returning to Celtic, as well as praising Manchester United’s signings of Neil Webb and Mike Phelan.

In international news, Ruud Gullit and Frank Rijkaard avoided a fatal plane crash when they were refused permission by AC Milan to appear in an exhibition game in Surinam. The plane taking the players playing in the game crashed.

Karl-Heize Rummenigge announced his retirement, while AC Milan want to sign Gianluca Vialli. Juventus have also made a signing, 11 year old Fabio Alderucci.

There is a double page feature on players not leaving Old Firm clubs, with Ally McCoist staying at Rangers despite interest from Arsenal, Everton and Atalanta, and Chris Morris turning down QPR and Leeds to stay at Celtic.

There is a full page feature on the sides with the worst discipline in England and Scotland, Portsmouth being the “winners” with seven red cards.

Match’s Player Of The Year vote saw what was described as a “50s revival”, with most of the winners being veterans born in the 1950s.

In ads, Ian Rush is advertising Nike, putting snooker chalk on his boot.

Gary Waddock, now playing for Charleroi in Belgium, tells Match of his dream of playing for Republic of Ireland at the 1990 World Cup in Italy, just two years after retiring through injury.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.9.1985

England’s new star striker Gary Lineker shares cover space with Ian Rush, ahead of a vital week of World Cup Qualifiers, with Rush stating that Wales will destroy Scotland.

Rush gets a double page spread, saying that Wales will win and set up a Play-Off against a team from Oceania, due to Scotland missing the suspended Graeme Souness.

Unsurprisingly, Scotland think they will get the win, according to Shoot columnist Willie Miller.

The match ended in a 1-1 draw, a result which sent Scotland into a Play-Off against Australia, which they won 2-0 on aggregate to reach the World Cup in Mexico.

The game will be remembered for the death of Scotland manager Jock Stein, who collapsed on the touchline moments before the final whistle.

Sammy McIlroy gets interviewed about Northern Ireland’s game in Turkey, expecting Turkey to provide difficult opponents despite losing 8-0 to England earlier in the group.

Kevin Sheedy gets interviewed about Republic Of Ireland’s chances of reaching the World Cup, stating that they can do it. Sheedy had yet to win an away game in his international career, and would need to start doing so, with trips to Switzerland and Soviet Union coming up.

England’s game against Romania is previewed, with manager Bobby Robson singing the praises of Gary Lineker, who had only made his international debut earlier that year.

Bryan Robson uses his column to focus on players who are aiming to head to Mexico next summer, such as Adrian Heath, Paul Walsh, Peter Davenport, Steve Williams and Remi Moses.

Celtic’s new star Alan McInally gets a double page spread, while Rangers also get a double page spread. Well, Queens Park Rangers.

Justin Fashanu also gets a profile as he hopes to get Brighton promoted from the Second Division.

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to express his fears after Scotland manager Jock Stein considers picking only domestic based players after having problems getting access to English based players.

One Scottish striker not worried about not getting picked is Kenny Dalglish, also player-manager at Liverpool, telling Shoot he’ll have no hesitation in dropping himself.

Meanwhile, there is disharmony with the West Germany squad, due to a row breaking out between Berndt Schuster and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge. Schuster was currently in international exile due to a disagreement with manager Franz Beckenbauer.

A dispute with broadcasters means that no club games in England are televised, so Shoot does double page photos of some of the best action.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.5.1982

Kevin Keegan is the cover star of Shoot as the 1982 World Cup in Spain approaches, and the 24 competing teams are getting ready for their final preparations.

As you open the magazine, Glenn Hoddle tells Shoot that he will only replicate his club form for England if he is given a run of games, while Tony Morley of Aston Villa fears he may miss out in Spain due to manager Ron Greenwood only liking to play one winger.

In news, Keith Burkinshaw and John Toshack have declared that three points for a win, introduced in 1981-1982 season, has been a success, while Gordon Taylor hit back at Trevor Francis and Mick Mills over their criticism of the timing of the PFA Player Of The Year Awards.

Shoot does a full page profile of Arsenal youngster Stewart Robson, who broke into the first-team straight from school.

In adverts, you could get a series of World Cup wallcharts for just £3.50, plus 50p for P and P.

In letters, Liam Farrington from Dublin writes in to protest about English born Tony Galvin being called up to the Republic of Ireland squad.

Gary Shaw uses his column to talk about his joy at Aston Villa reaching the European Cup Final, but also his disappointment that the second leg of their Semi-Final against Anderlecht was ruined by trouble on the terraces.

Ahead of Scotland’s World Cup opener, Shoot asks various Scottish players such as Alfie Conn, Frank McGarvey and Paul Hegarty what the starting 11 in Malaga on June 15th should be.

Shoot does a full page profile on Craig Johnston, who he says has passed his Anfield Apprenticeship, and is now a fully fledged first-team player.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to suggest that England won’t be putting out an experimental side in their friendly against Holland, ahead of the World Cup.

Talking of England, in World Cup Merchandise, you could buy a Memo Pad, complete with a photo of England’s official mascot, Billy Bulldog.

Karl-Heiz Rummenigge is interviewed ahead of the World Cup, and tells Shoot he fears that West Germany’s chances could be ruined by injuries.

It is revealed that Asa Hartford of Manchester City has an unusual hobby, collecting matchbook.

Motherwell were rocked by rumours that manager David Hay was set to resign, while Phil Thompson’s column comments on young players getting an opportunity to play at England’s biggest clubs.

Justin Fashanu uses his column to talk about change in football, as Nottingham Forest go through a transition after a successful period in the late 1970s.

Garry Thompson tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Coventry City, while Everton manager Howard Kendall says that Graeme Sharp is as good as Frank Stapleton.

The magazine ends with a profile of Gary Lineker, who reveals he wants to be a Bookmaker when his playing career ends.