MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.2.1986

The other way around from the movie series, it is Bond sending rather than receiving an SOS, as Birmingham City manager John Bond wants to bring cover star Trevor Francis beck to St Andrews from Sampdoria.

As you open the magazine, Mark Hughes tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Manchester United, amidst rumours of a move to Barcelona.

In news, Terry Venables is linked with a move to Spurs at the end of the season, while leaving White Hart Lane could be Ally Dick, linked with a move to Hibs.

In World Cup news, Billy Bingham hits back at criticism of Northern Ireland’s preparation being against heavyweight sides such as Denmark and France, while Scotland manager Alex Ferguson has added Archie Knox and Craig Brown to his backroom staff for their campaign in Mexico.

Cover star Francis tells Shoot he is still available for England, having missed a recent friendly due to injury, and suggests he could create a place for himself in right midfield in Mexico.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that the recent signing of Terry Gibson could be a boost for Manchester United in the title race.

In Scotland, Falkirk winger Jimmy Gilmour is playing so well, he is drawing comparisons to his uncle, former Celtic winger Jimmy Johnstone.

Crystal Palace manager Steve Coppell, only 30, tells Shoot that his side have had to change their style of play in order to get results, after previously missing out despite playing well.

Having saved Manchester City and Swansea City from relegation, John Bond is looking for a hat-trick by keeping Birmingham City up. In order to do this, he tells Shoot he wants to bring Trevor Francis back to the club, after Francis left to join Nottingham Forest in 1979 in England’s first £1m transfer.

Gary Mabbutt gets scouted by Shoot during Tottenham Hotspur’s match against Nottingham Forest, stating that he was exposed against a striker like Peter Davenport.

Back to Scotland, and Aberdeen’s John Hewitt tells Shoot that Dons manager Alex Ferguson is hard to please.

West Brom’s George Reilly tells Shoot he is happy at The Hawthorns after a short spell at Newcastle United.

Kenny Swain tells Shoot that he believes his experience of winning the title with Aston Villa in 1981 will help Portsmouth as they aim to get promoted to the top flight for the first time in 27 years.

West Ham goalkeeper Phil Parkes is having the best season of his career, and owes it to giving up booze after a drink driving ban in January 1985.

Ian Rush uses his column to praise his Liverpool team-mate Sammy Lee, who is celebrating his 27th birthday thsi week.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a double page spread on how Sunderland fans are losing patience with Lawrie McMenemy, after failing to launch a promotion bid.

The magazine ends with a “Focus On …..” Gordon Durie. His favourite bands are Depeche Mode and Simple Minds.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 27.12.1980

Santa Claus of North Pole United in the cover star of Shoot, as the first Christmas of the 1980s approaches.

Except, that it’s not Santa Claus, it’s a footballer dressed up as him. All will be revealed on page 2.

Out mystery Santa is someone who enjoys dressing up in red and white, Tony Woodcock of Arsenal.

Shoot gets in the Christmas spirit by suggesting presents for various football personalities, with a razor for bearded Aston Villa player Dennis Mortimer, while Watford chairman Elton John is suggested a piano with a TV screen so that he can watch Watford matches while he is on tour. I’m not sure that has actually been invented. I might just try and copyright that.

Shoot reviews the first-half of the English league season, with Liverpool and Aston Villa level on points at the top, with Liverpool looking to become the first team since the 1930s to win 3 titles in a row, while Aston Villa are looking for their first title in 71 years.

Eamonn McCabe, Sports Photographer Of The Year, gets a double page spread showing his favourite photos from 1980, while there is a competition to win a camera.

Ray Clemence uses his column to look back at the year, with the high of Liverpool winning the league and a low of England’s group exit at the European Championship.

There is a double page photo collage of Wales and England’s recent World Cup Qualifiers, with the headline “Spain – Here We Come”.

Wales didn’t make it to Spain, and England just about qualified.

Liverpool’s reserve team gets a full page feature, asking four of their players – Ian Rush, Howard Gayle, Steve Ogrizovic and Richard Money – what it’s like to play for Liverpool’s reserves.

Liverpool’s title rivals Aston Villa are featured on the next page, looking at their “Dunfermline connection”, as two players from the Fife town, Allan Evans and Ken McNaught, playing their part in Villa’s title bid.

In news, Graham Gooch is training with West Ham to keep himself fit during Cricket’s off-season.

Shoot does a feature on “Forgotten Heroes”, the players who are struggling to get first team action in 1980.

Dundee get a team poster while Phil Neal gets a player profile. His favourite music is Michael Jackson, Gerry Rafferty and ELO.

There is a joint interview with Peter McCloy (Rangers) and Pat Bonner (Celtic) about what it’s like to play in goal for an Old Firm team.

Staying in Scotland, Gordon McQueen uses his column to look back at 1980, and reveals that a clairvoyant that a great 1981 has been predicted for him.

Aston Villa travel to Brighton over Christmas, and John Gregory of Brighton, a former Villa player, tells Shoot that the club deserves success.

In South America, Uruguay were hosting a tournament to celebrate 50 years since the first World Cup, involving all former winners. England declined the option as it would have involved postponing league games over Christmas. Meanwhile, Shoot does a joint interview with Diego Maradona and Alfredo Di Stefano.

Clive Allen uses his column to state that he is looking forward to Crystal Palace’s trip to Southampton, mainly for the opportunity to meet Kevin Keegan.

John Chiedozie of Leyton Orient is profiled, with his manager describing his as “England’s best winger”

Unfortunately for Ron Greenwood, he was already declared himself for Nigeria.

Andy Gray writes in his column about how injuries have benefitted Wolves, as it has presented first-team opportunities to some of their promising youngsters.

Manchester United get featured, with Shoot focusing on the fanaticism of their fans, suggesting that girls born in Manchester are likely to be called Louise (after Lou Macari) or Samantha (after Sammy McIlroy)

Shoot does a double page spread on players they predict to be “England’s Superstars Of The 1980s”, listing players such as Craig Johnston, Gary Shaw, Steve McMahon, Remi Moses, Sammy Lee, Gary Mabbutt, Peter Beardsley and Adrian Heath to make an impact in the upcoming decade.

There is a photo compilation of the biggest footballing moments of 1980, while there is a calendar for 1981.

With 18 months to go, the countdown to the 1982 World Cup is already underway, with Spanish clubs spending a combined £50m modernising their stadiums to host games, with Shoot giving a club by club breakdown.

Peter Shilton uses his column to champion Terry Butcher’s cause for a place in the England team, and reveals he’s always been a fan of Tottenham due to the way they played football in the 60s.

Derek Johnston’s column recalls Andy Cameron’s stand-up routine at the Player Of The Year Awards where he made fun of players of every club, including his beloved Rangers.

There is also a feature on managers such as Dave Sexton, Brian Clough, Ron Saunders and Lawrie McMenemy who have all went on to bigger things despite experiencing the sack early in their career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SCORE – MAY 1999

This week, we go back to the turn of the century, and the short lived Irish League magazine Score, with Kevin Horlock being the cover star, in action for Northern Ireland against Germany in a recent European Championship Qualifier.

As you open the magazine, there is a full page profile of Dundela.

David Larmour of Linfield gets a profile, across the page of a profile of Davy O’Hare. It is expected that O’Hare will spend the summer of 1999 choosing between signing for Linfield (Neil Inglis getting binned after an error in the Irish Cup Semi-Final) or Glentoran (Wayne Russell possibly signing for Bohemians).

Paul Leeman takes a quiz on Irish League football, only managing a score of 8 out of 10, getting a question wrong on when Glentoran last won the league.

Lee Feeney writes a diary on his time in Glasgow, having just signed for Rangers. One of team-mates is Scott Young’s brother, with whom he has Irish League banter.

Another ex Linfield player profiled is Billy Murray, who had come out of retirement in his 40s to play in John Easton’s Testimonial, and looks back on his career, mostly spent with Linfield.

The magazine is Belfast centric, and all the clubs in the city have a news update, from the four top flight clubs to those in the lower leagues.

Joining the four Belfast clubs in the top flight for 1999-2000 will be Distillery, soon to be renamed Lisburn Distillery, and Jim McCloskey gives the lowdown on his team-mates.

Glentoran won the league title in 1999, and the celebrations get a full page profile.

The back page focuses on the national side with fans being urged to get behind manager Lawrie McMenemy, at the halfway point of Euro 2000 Qualifiers.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.12.1985

Frank McAvennie is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, having just broken into the Scotland team.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has a double page feature on Kerry Dixon, where it is revealed that Spurs turned down the chance to sign him.

Garry Birtles is interviewed, having just been converted into a central defender, and is loving it, despite the fear of giving away a penalty.

Terry Gibson tells Shoot that he does not expect Manchester United to win the league, which will have been awkward when he signed for United later that season.

The IFA have stated that they expect to make £250,000 from their appearance at next year’s World Cup in Mexico.

There is continuing talk of a Super League in English football. Shoot asks various football stars about the way forward. Gary Stevens (the Spurs one, not the Everton one) suggests games on Sundays, Don Mackay of Coventry wants 6 divisions of 16 teams, while Mark Hughes wants less games.

Sunderland v Portsmouth is billed as the big game of the weekend, and Shoot focuses on the mutual admiration between respective managers Alan Ball and Lawrie McMenemy.

Scotland’s World Cup Qualifier against Australia gets a double page spread, focusing on Scotland’s strikers at opposite ends of their career – Frank McAvennie making his debut, and Kenny Dalglish winning his 99th cap.

Talking of Scotland, Shoot looks at youth team boss Andy Roxburgh, and his globetrotting exploits in 1985.

Most of those, were scouting trips. Talking of scouting, Shoot scouts Steve McMahon of Liverpool, describing him as a new Graeme Souness.

McAvennie is mentioned again, in Ian Rush’s column, who describes his as a great goalscorer, adding that his Wales team-mate Mark Hughes isn’t a great goalscorer.

Jimmy Greaves gives his Star Letter award to Norwich City supporting brothers championing Steve Bruce’s case for a place in the England squad.

Bryab Robson uses his column to reveal that the signing of Colin Gibson has lifted the mood of everybody at Old Trafford.

Bobby Moore has enlisted the help of various former West Ham team-mates as he aims for success as Southend United manager. The club are currently making plans to move to a new stadium at Rochford.

Leeds United get a Club Profile and Team Poster.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1981

Liam Brady, sipping from a bottle of water (a glass bottle as well, no health and safety in them days), is the cover star of Shoot, as he adjusts to life in Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Brady, who has so far been a resounding success at Juventus.

In a bid to improve their style of play, Coventry City have banned their players from passing the ball back to their goalkeeper, while the National Hairdressers Federation have voted Lawrie McMenemy as Head Of The Year, alongside Felicity Kendall.

Derek Johnstone uses his column to comment on how Rangers have missed European football in 1980-1981, and are desperate for it to return to Ibrox in 1981-1982, as he reflects on his favourite memories taking on continental opposition.

Another Scotsman with a column is Andy Gray, who states that he is baffled by Wolves recent poor form.

The recent PFA Awards get covered, as John Wark wins Player Of The Year, and Gary Shaw wings Young Player Of The Year.

Ray Clemence’s column analyses the recent League Cup Final between Liverpool and West Ham, which finished 1-1, with a replay due to be played at Villa Park this week. That match gets profiled a few pages over.

Shoot profiles two former England players trying to have success as a manager, Larry Lloyd of Wigan and Norman Hunter of Barnsley, while new Bristol City goalkeeper Jan Moller says he wants to be as good as Peter Shilton, the goalkeeper at the opposition end of the pitch in the 1979 European Cup Final.

Another foreigner in England getting profiled is Bosco Jankovic of Middlesbrough, whose contract is expiring, and he has decide wether to stay in England or return to Yugoslavia.

Diego Maradona gets a profile after becoming the world’s first £4m player when he moved from Argentinos to Boca Juniors.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to write about three young strikers at Manchester United he believes will be big stars in the future – Norman Whiteside, Mark Hughes and Scott McGarvey. Two out of three ain’t bad.

Four footballing figures get interviewed on how to improve the game. West Bromwich Albion manager Ron Atkinson is not in favour of Sunday football, but is in favour of three points for a win.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve Moran of Southampton, who reveals that his favourite music is Mike Oldfield and Diana Ross.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.9.1979

Nottingham Forest winger John Robertson, pictured holding the European Cup, is the cover star accompanied by the headline “CAN FOREST RETAIN THE EUROPEAN CUP?”, as Europe’s three competitions are getting ready to swing into action.

The biggest threat to Forest’s grip on the trophy, in Robertson’s opinion, came from Liverpool, who he said he hope would get put out early, but admitted the two teams playing in the final would be great for English football.

As it turned out, Liverpool had an early exit, a First Round exit to Soviet team Dinamo Tblisi, while Forest would go on and retain the trophy, beating Hamburg 1-0 in Madrid.

Turning over the page, Shoot does a full page feature on the chances of the British sides in their ties, against a various mix of opponents.

In news, Alan Ball Snr (father of 1966 World Cup winner of the same name) is singing the praises of Scandinavian players as representing value for English clubs, having just spent three years coaching in Sweden.

Colin Bell of Manchester City announced his retirement aged 33.

Lawrie McMenemy expressed his fears of a “Super League” emerging within England’s top flight, due to the spending power of some clubs.

Brian Quinn moved from Larne to Everton for £60,000 – a record between clubs from Northern Ireland and England, and is aiming to be the 10th Everton player to play for Northern Ireland since World War II, just short of the 14 players supplied by joint record holders Manchester United and Linfield.

Alex Sabella turned down a move from Sheffield United …….. because his wife wasn’t keen on living in the North-East.

Motherwell manager Ally MacLeod is to be investigated by the SFA after publishing a book claiming that Willie Johnston wasn’t the only Scotland player to have taken illegal substances at the previous summer’s World Cup.

In his column, Ray Clemence is looking forward to his first trip to the Soviet Union, for Liverpool’s European Cup tie with Dinamo Tblisi.

Shoot does a full page feature on the West Country, interviewing a player from Plymouth Argyle, Exeter City and Torquay United on the future of football in the area.

Dave Watson, recently signed for Werder Bremen, was sent off in his second game for the club, and bemoans the strictness of German referees, while also dismissing criticism of his signing by German newspaper Bild.

Andy Gray hits back after being booed by Aston Villa fans after requesting a transfer, and was upset by Villa holding out for £1m, stating no player is worth that amount (though Trevor Francis was earlier that year)

Later that month, Gray signed for Wolves for £1.5m

There was a four page feature on Manchester City, including a double page colour poster.

Tommy Docherty is in fighting form, proclaiming “I’m still one of the best”, and that he is happy with his summer spending having spent £1m on five players, including England Under 21 goalkeeper Chris Woods.

Docherty had been sacked by Manchester United two years previously due to an extramarital affair, and was hoping his spell at Loftus Road would propel him back into the big time.

QPR finished 5th in Division Two (no play-offs then, only the top 3 went up) and Docherty was sacked, before being reinstated, than sacked again in October 1980.

“Life has never been happier at the aptly named Gay Meadow” writes Shoot, presumably in The Flintstones sense, as manager Graham Turner has just led them into England’s second tier for the first time.

Shoot gives a page to Ian Redford, a star at Dundee described as “The new Alan Gilzean”

Redford joined Rangers in 1980 for a Scottish record, won four trophies at Ibrox, and played for Dundee United in the 1987 UEFA Cup Final. Redford died in January 2014, aged 53.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to claim that he scored United’s goal against Southampton on the opening day of the season, which was credited as an own goal, and denies rumours that Mickey Thomas was to be sold to Everton in an exchange for Dave Thomas.

On the back page, there was a colour poster of new Crystal Palace signings Gerry Francis and Mike Flanagan.