MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – AUGUST 1986

It’s the summer of 1986, and Diego Maradona, holding aloft the World Cup is the cover star of World Soccer, with Mexico 86 still a recent memory.

As you open the magazine, there is a tribute to former FIFA President Sir Stanley Rous, described as “The Father Of Football”, who was taken ill in Mexico, and died a few weeks later on his return to London.

World Soccer views Mexico 86 as a success, but the tournament was not without flaws. Having 24 teams in the finals and allowing some 3rd placed teams to qualify, in their view, encouraged Bulgaria to employ negative tactics against Argentina, as a narrow defeat would put them through.

Azeglio Vicini is the favourite for the Italy job, should Enzo Bearzot leave his job as manager of the recently dethroned champions.

There is a double page profile of Argentina’s winning squad.

France get a post-mortem, having reached the Semi-Finals for the second successive tournament, where it is declared that their glorious midfield is a thing of the past.

Denmark get previewed, but are looking forward, not back, to an upcoming friendly against West Germany as they aim for revenge against a team they beat in Mexico. Why revenge? West Germany manager Franz Beckenbauer described their style of play as primitive.

England’s post-mortem focuses om the future of Bobby Robson, with writer Eric Batty saying he must stay in the job.

Bayern Munich get a double page feature as they aim to win the European Cup. They came close, losing to Porto in he final that season.

There is a feature on two young Scottish managers in big jobs, Kenny Dalglish who won the League and FA Cup in his first season as Liverpool manager, and Graeme Souness, given his first job at Rangers, and caused a stir by calling them the biggest club in Britain.

In Yugoslavia, Partizan Belgrade have been stripped of the league title as a result of alleged match fixing.

The draws for the 1st Round of the three European trophies are reviewed, with the tie of the round being the meeting of PSV Eindhoven and Bayern Munich in the European Cup.

There is a feature about club football in Canada, or rather, the lack of, something which World Soccer says is vital is they want to capitalise on reaching their first World Cup.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 23.4.1994

It’s Derby Day in Manchester, and this is reflected with Paul Walsh and Andrei Kanchelskis appearing on the cover of Shoot.

As you open the magazine, there is a poster of Liverpool’s Rob Jones, Steve Nicol and Julian Dicks.

United’s recent FA Cup Semi-final Replay win over Oldham gets a double page spread, with most of the focus being on Andrei Kanchelskis and his goal.

Having just made his England debut, Darren Anderton is already worried that he might not be able to add to his number of caps in future, if Tottenham Hotspur are unsuccessful in their battle against relegation.

Over the page, there is a poster of Neil Webb.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot does a double page feature focusing on Nigeria’s chances, having qualified for the first time.

In 1994, Shoot had a columnist called Metro, who was the reigning Nintendo UK Champion. He reviewed video games. This week, he reviewed Ryan Giggs Champions World Class Soccer.

In adverts, there were adverts for World Cup Cards, made by a company called Uppper Deck.

Paul Gascoigne had recently suffered a serious and potentially career ending injury. Shoot dedicates a page to this, with a host of footballers offering messages of support to him.

In foreign news, Inter Milan want to offload Dennis Bergkamp and replace him with Chris Sutton, while AC Milan want to buy back Ruud Gullit, a year after selling him after they thought he was too old.

Arsenal’s win over Paris St Germain in the European Cup Winners Cup Semi-Final gets a double page spread. It was a bittersweet night for Arsenal, as Ian Wright would miss the final through suspension.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot has a series previewing it, with a comic book style full page look at past tournaments. This week featured the 1950 tournament.

Rangers and Dundee United have won through to the Scottish Cup Final, and this gets a double page feature, with Rangers aiming to make history by becoming the first team to win back to back trebles.

The Manchester Derby gets previewed on the final pages, with an interview with City’s Michael Vonk.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1992

It’s Cup Semi-Finals in England and Scotland, and this is reflected with John Byrne of Sunderland being the cover star.

As you open the magazine, there is an article titled “Stuff Your Seats”, as Shoot canvassed fans for their opinion on all seater stadiums, the majority of responses were against this.

Liverpool and Portsmouth’s Semi-Final gets previewed with Ian Rush and Warren Aspinall profiling their team-mates, while Gordon Armstrong and Robert Fleck do so for the Sunderland v Norwich tie.

Jim Leighton gets interviewed about what he describes as “My United Hell” after being dropped at Old Trafford, and how he had initial doubts about signing for Dundee, and now has ambitions of winning promotion to the Scottish Premier League.

John Murray from Cork suggests that the costs of all seater stadiums means it makes more sense for clubs to groundshar. Jimmy Greaves agrees with him, but can’t see it happening.

In Scotland, Shoot profiles Hearts goalkeeper Henry Smith, who is determined to make up for his error which cost Hearts their Semi-Final against Celtic at Hampden in 1988. Smith’s ambitions are to win the Scottish Cup and go to Euro 92, having made his international debut earlier this year at the age of 35.

Brett Angell of Southend gets interviewed about rejecting a moive to big spending Blackburn Rovers, saying that the timing was all wrong.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, which will preview the League Cup Final between Nottingham Forest and Manchester United.

The magazine ends with a double page spread on the troubles endured by London’s top flight clubs in 91-92.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 27.12.1980

Santa Claus of North Pole United in the cover star of Shoot, as the first Christmas of the 1980s approaches.

Except, that it’s not Santa Claus, it’s a footballer dressed up as him. All will be revealed on page 2.

Out mystery Santa is someone who enjoys dressing up in red and white, Tony Woodcock of Arsenal.

Shoot gets in the Christmas spirit by suggesting presents for various football personalities, with a razor for bearded Aston Villa player Dennis Mortimer, while Watford chairman Elton John is suggested a piano with a TV screen so that he can watch Watford matches while he is on tour. I’m not sure that has actually been invented. I might just try and copyright that.

Shoot reviews the first-half of the English league season, with Liverpool and Aston Villa level on points at the top, with Liverpool looking to become the first team since the 1930s to win 3 titles in a row, while Aston Villa are looking for their first title in 71 years.

Eamonn McCabe, Sports Photographer Of The Year, gets a double page spread showing his favourite photos from 1980, while there is a competition to win a camera.

Ray Clemence uses his column to look back at the year, with the high of Liverpool winning the league and a low of England’s group exit at the European Championship.

There is a double page photo collage of Wales and England’s recent World Cup Qualifiers, with the headline “Spain – Here We Come”.

Wales didn’t make it to Spain, and England just about qualified.

Liverpool’s reserve team gets a full page feature, asking four of their players – Ian Rush, Howard Gayle, Steve Ogrizovic and Richard Money – what it’s like to play for Liverpool’s reserves.

Liverpool’s title rivals Aston Villa are featured on the next page, looking at their “Dunfermline connection”, as two players from the Fife town, Allan Evans and Ken McNaught, playing their part in Villa’s title bid.

In news, Graham Gooch is training with West Ham to keep himself fit during Cricket’s off-season.

Shoot does a feature on “Forgotten Heroes”, the players who are struggling to get first team action in 1980.

Dundee get a team poster while Phil Neal gets a player profile. His favourite music is Michael Jackson, Gerry Rafferty and ELO.

There is a joint interview with Peter McCloy (Rangers) and Pat Bonner (Celtic) about what it’s like to play in goal for an Old Firm team.

Staying in Scotland, Gordon McQueen uses his column to look back at 1980, and reveals that a clairvoyant that a great 1981 has been predicted for him.

Aston Villa travel to Brighton over Christmas, and John Gregory of Brighton, a former Villa player, tells Shoot that the club deserves success.

In South America, Uruguay were hosting a tournament to celebrate 50 years since the first World Cup, involving all former winners. England declined the option as it would have involved postponing league games over Christmas. Meanwhile, Shoot does a joint interview with Diego Maradona and Alfredo Di Stefano.

Clive Allen uses his column to state that he is looking forward to Crystal Palace’s trip to Southampton, mainly for the opportunity to meet Kevin Keegan.

John Chiedozie of Leyton Orient is profiled, with his manager describing his as “England’s best winger”

Unfortunately for Ron Greenwood, he was already declared himself for Nigeria.

Andy Gray writes in his column about how injuries have benefitted Wolves, as it has presented first-team opportunities to some of their promising youngsters.

Manchester United get featured, with Shoot focusing on the fanaticism of their fans, suggesting that girls born in Manchester are likely to be called Louise (after Lou Macari) or Samantha (after Sammy McIlroy)

Shoot does a double page spread on players they predict to be “England’s Superstars Of The 1980s”, listing players such as Craig Johnston, Gary Shaw, Steve McMahon, Remi Moses, Sammy Lee, Gary Mabbutt, Peter Beardsley and Adrian Heath to make an impact in the upcoming decade.

There is a photo compilation of the biggest footballing moments of 1980, while there is a calendar for 1981.

With 18 months to go, the countdown to the 1982 World Cup is already underway, with Spanish clubs spending a combined £50m modernising their stadiums to host games, with Shoot giving a club by club breakdown.

Peter Shilton uses his column to champion Terry Butcher’s cause for a place in the England team, and reveals he’s always been a fan of Tottenham due to the way they played football in the 60s.

Derek Johnston’s column recalls Andy Cameron’s stand-up routine at the Player Of The Year Awards where he made fun of players of every club, including his beloved Rangers.

There is also a feature on managers such as Dave Sexton, Brian Clough, Ron Saunders and Lawrie McMenemy who have all went on to bigger things despite experiencing the sack early in their career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 26.12.1987

It’s the Christmas edition of Match, and Match columnist Emlyn Hughes is on the cover, dressed as Santa and giving his son Emlyn the 1988 Match Football Yearbook as a present.

His other child, Emma Lynn, was not on the cover. His kids are genuinely called that.

Alan Hansen gets a double page spread has he declares that Liverpool haven’t won anything yet, despite their unbeaten start to the season.

Emlyn Hughes gets asked whose Christmas party he would like to be invited to, and replies Margaret Thatcher so he could tell her that she has done so much for the country.

Paul McStay is doing just that at Celtic, committing his future to the club for the next five years after admitting he did consider leaving to play in English football.

The draw for the 1990 World Cup Qualifiers has been made, and Match previews the chances of the four home nations.

Davie Cooper uses his column to look back at Rangers title in in 1987, and plugs his own autobiography for anyone wanting ideas for a Christmas present.

In competitions, you could win a trip to the New Balance factory in Cumbria to see how football boots are made, and some signed Bryan Robson goodies.

Match does a feature on Kevin Kennedy, AKA Curly Watts from Coronation Street about his love of Manchester City.

With Liverpool unbeaten and looking certain to win the title, Match does an interview with former manager Bob Paisley, who describes this team as the most talented of his 40 year association with the club.

In foreign news, West German midielder Olaf Thon is subject to a transfer battle in Italy, with Juventus, Inter Milan and Sampdoria all wanting to sign him.

The magazine ends with a poster of Nottingham Forest players celebrating beating Manchester United in an indoor 6 a side tournament.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 30.4.1988

Luton Town are the cover stars of Shoot, as the 1988 League Cup Final gets reviewed.

Luton’s 3-2 win over Arsenal gets three pages of coverage, with a full page dedicated to penalty save hero Andy Dibble, who is attracting transfer interest after deputising for the injured Les Sealey.

Also celebrating a trophy win are newly crowned League Champions Liverpool, which gets a full page feature.

Norman Whiteside looks set to leave Manchester United after a contract dispute. Whiteside also has a go at Jimmy Hill for his scrutinising of tackles by non English players in the aftermath of criticism by Hill of a tackle by Whiteside during a recent game at Anfield.

Shoot prints out a handy guide for the Football League Play-Offs, in their second season.

John Barnes uses his column to pay tribute to Peter Beardsley.

Talking of Peter Beardsley, he is modelling the new England kit for Euro 88.

And talking of Euro 88, there is a four page profile of Spain.

In world news, Inter Milan want to sign Lothar Matthaus, while FIFA are threatening to take the 1990 World Cup away from Italy and award it to West Germany after the preparations have fallen behind schedule.

There is a double page feature on two teenage players who have broken through in Division One – Michael O’Neill and Alan Shearer.

Rangers fans who love dogs were in for a treat as Shoot do a feature on Ally McCoist and Graham Roberts love of dogs.

Bryan Gunn gets interviewed and tells Shoot that Norwich players are responsible for the poor run of form that saw the departure of manager Ken Brown.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which has a free Euro 88 sticker book.

The magazine ends with a feature on John Charles Testimonial Match, which saw Ian Rush and Michel Platini make guest appearances for Leeds United, though Rush would go on to sign for Leeds eight years later.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 15.4.1989

Nottingham Forest are the cover stars of this week’s edition of Match, having won the League Cup. They’re in cup action this week in the FA Cup, facing Liverpool in the Semi-Finals, a match that would sadly be remembered for the tragic events that happened in the Leppings Lane terraces.

That match got a double page preview, with Match columnist Emlyn Hughes predicting a 2-1 win for Liverpool. For the record, when the match was rearranged, Liverpool won 3-1.

Hughes also previews the other Semi-final between Everton and Norwich, predicting a 2-0 win for Everton. Everton won the game 1-0.

It’s also the Scottish Cup Semi-Finals, with Hibs facing Celtic. Hibs new signing Keith Houchen has cup pedigree, albeit in England, where he scored for Coventry in the FA Cup Final just two years earlier..

Celtic had just returned from Dubai, where they faced Liverpool in an unofficial British Championship, as both sides were defending champions, and Match does a joint interview with Andy Walker and Steve McMahon.

For the record, Celtic won that match on penalties after a 1-1 draw.

In ads, you could buy VHS tapes of League Cup Finals over the previous 15 years for just £9.99

Battling it out for the FA Cup, Everton have already won one trophy, with Match voting them Programme Of The Year.

Nottingham Forest’s win over Luton in the League Cup Final gets a double page spread, as well as a double sided poster.

Stuart Munro gets a profile, being a regular in the Rangers team despite being linked with moves for Tony Dorigo, Stuart Pearce and Colin Gibson.

On the verge of promotion to Division One, Chelsea get a full page profile, and interview with Clive Wilson.

As well as winning the League Cup, Nottingham Forest win another trophy, as Match gives them an award for having the best disciplinary record in English football.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : IRISH SOCCER MAGAZINE – OCTOBER 1998

Paul Doolin of Bohemians and Denis Irwin are the cover stars of Irish Soccer Magazine, which you could have purchased for IR£1.50 at Tuthills. Sorry, I couldn’t get the sticker off.

The editorial focuses on Pat Dolan’s disillusionment with the League Of Ireland and his threat to quit, hoping that he doesn’t.

There is a preview of Republic Of Ireland’s forthcoming Euro 2000 away to Yugoslavia, stating that a draw would be a more than acceptable result.

That match would be postponed because of unrest in The Balkans, eventually being played in November 1998.

In foreign news, Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal are said to be involved in the creation of a European Super League.

There is a feature on TV coverage of football in Republic Of Ireland, as a new commercial broadcaster, TV3, is launched, and this is welcomed, as it means competition for RTE will mean they have to raise their game.

As well as looking forward to Yugoslavia, there is a look back at Republic Of Ireland’s opening Euro 2000 Qualifier, a 2-0 win over World Cup Semi-Finalists Croatia.

Eamonn Gibson has a column on British football, where he writes that the Bosman Rule and foreign import at other clubs have caused Manchester United to stand still. There is also a feature on the possibility of Wimbledon relocating to Dublin, after a recent poll claimed Dubliners were in favour of it.

There is a preview of domestic games in October, the highlight being the clash between St Patrick’s Athletic and Cork City at the end of the month.

There is also a preview of the games in September, a month that saw Brian Kerr awarded Manager Of The Month.

Cork City were recently in European action, and their defeat in the European Cup Winners Cup to CSKA Kiev gets a page of coverage.

In Dublin, St Patrick’s Athletic have announced plans to leave Richmond Park to build a new stadium at nearby St Michael’s Flats within the next five years, while the FAI have announced plans for a 40,000 all seater stadium, as well as redevelopment for Tolka Park and Dalymount Park.

The new commercial broadcaster TV3 gets a feature, focusing on their proposed football coverage, having bought the rights to Republic Of Ireland’s away Euro 2000 Qualifiers.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT 19.2.1977

Match action from Ipswich Town v Leeds United is on the cover of Shoot, but it is four other clubs – Aston Villa, Bolton Wanderers, Everton and Queens Park Rangers – who are the main focus, as the League Cup reaches the Semi-Final stage.

In news, 16 year old Alan Currie was set to leave Cliftonville for Luton Town, Leeds and Wales would be meeting in a Testimonial for Gary Sprake. Staying in Yorkshire, Sheffield United want to sign Vic Moreland from Glentoran following Peter Dornan’s return to Linfield.

Neil Warnock, a player at Barnsley, has just passed his referee’s exam and is now a qualified official.

Finally, Radio City in Liverpool have signed up Duncan McKenzie and John Toshack for a Sunday afternoon radio show.

The second legs of the League Cup Semi-Finals are preview, both of which are level after the first legs. The first leg of the QPR v Aston Villa game took place too late to have a reaction from both teams, the game was delayed due to postponements.

Bolton had got a draw at Goodison Park. Bolton manager Ian Greaves commented that his side would now have to manage expectations after the draw at Goodison.

Everton won the second leg 1-0 to go through 2-1 on aggregate.

After a 0-0 draw at Loftus Road, QPR and Aston Villa drew 2-2 in the second leg at Villa Park. There were no away goals in those days, so it went to a replay at Highbury, with Villa winning 3-0.

After needing three games to win their Semi-Final, Villa would need three games to beat Everton in the final, winning a Second Replay 3-2 at Old Trafford.

Kevin Keegan uses his column to talk about tackles from behind, which he describes as “The curse of English soccer”

Shoot does a full page article on the goalscoring record of clubs in the history of league football, with Aston Villa the team with the best goals to game ratio, between 1888 and 1977.

In foreign news, Borussia Dortmund’s Westfalon stadium is set to become the second stadium in West Germany (after the Olympic Stadium in Munich) to get undersoil heating.

South American qualifiers for the 1978 World Cup (in South America) are due to get underway, and Shoot gives it a double page, with interviews from players based in Spain from Brazil, Peru, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Shoot dedicates two pages to the issue of sponsorship in football, canvassing Chairman, Managers, Players, including Derek Dougan, who got into a spot of bother for trying to get Kettering Town to wear shirt sponsorship.

Gordon Hill uses his column to write about his love of hunting, accompanied by a picture of him and Steve Coppell jokingly pointing a shotgun at Tommy Docherty.

Kenny Dalglish talks about celebrity fans in his column, and namedropping famous faces he has met at matches, such as Jackie Stewart and Rod Stewart.

On the back cover, there is a poster of Graeme Souness of Middlesbrough. In it, he has facial hair, but it is of the beard variety, rather than his trademark moustache.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 1.3.1986

Celtic and Manchester United are on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot as they prepare to face each other in a mid-season friendly, with the headline “Soccer on trial”.

The headline refers to the fact that it was the first high profile away game by an English club since the previous season’s European Cup Final, which resulted in English clubs being banned from Europe.

As you open the magazine, Danny Wallace fires a message to John Barnes and Chris Waddle that he is after their World Cup place following an impressive England debut in a recent friendly away to Egypt.

The friendly at Parkhead that featured on the cover gets a double page spread, with the game billed as an unofficial British Cup Winners Cup Final, after both teams won their respective national cup competitions in 1985.

Paul McStay of Celtic suggests that a former Rangers player might have a keen interest in this game, as Scotland manager Alex Ferguson might take the opportunity to spy on Jesper Olsen of United, with Denmark being a group opponent of Scotland in the forthcoming World Cup.

In ads, you can buy The Official FA Cup Game for just £7.75 on Spectrum, Commodore or Armstrad.

Talking of adverts, England’s squad has agreed a sponsorship deal with the Health Education Council to front an anti-smoking campaign.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise Peter Beardsley, who recently made his international debut during that recent friendly in Egypt.

Northern Ireland are also in international action, with an away friendly against France, with the game getting a double page feature, with John McClelland being interviewed.

Shoot looks at the options for Scotland’s squad, and they urge Alex Ferguson to find a place for Pat Nevin in the 22.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs youngster Gordon Hunter gets praised by his manager John Blackley.

Phil Thompson is interviewed, where he states that if he could lead Sheffield United into the top flight, it would be as big a thrill as all the trophies he won with Liverpool.

Across Sheffield, Wednesday striker Carl Shutt gets a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves awards his Wally Of The Week Award to Nick Gregory from Banbury, who states that Oxford United are the best team in England.

In Spain, Terry Venables is eyeing up a move to Tottenham Hotspur, but he could be replaced at Barcelona by another British manager, John Toshack of Real Sociedad.

Andy King is interviewed where he expresses his frustration at not getting much action at Luton Town.

Jack Charlton, newly appointed Republic Of Ireland manager, has a big decision to make, as he might have to drop 30 year olds Liam Brady, Frank Stapleton and Tony Grealish.

Charlton has faced some resentment for his appointment due to not being Irish, but also shock that he got the job ahead of Bob Paisley.

Much loved referee Clive Thomas comments on the number of penalties missed in recent years, pointing the finger at his fellow referees for allowing keepers to steal yards.

Craig Levein of Hearts gets a profile as he dreams of a World Cup place, just a few years after almost quitting football to work in an Electronics Factory.

The upcoming Merseyside Derby gets a double page feature, with contributions from Peter Reid and Steve McMahon.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Channon. His favourite music is Paul McCartney, Elton John and Rod Stewart.