MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MANCHESTER UNITED – AUGUST 1995

Lee Sharpe is the cover star of Manchester United’s official magazine during what would turn out to be an eventful summer at Old Trafford.

As you open the magazine, there is a poster of Paul Ince and Mark Hughes, who left United that summer.

Meanwhile, Eric Cantona would have an eventful return from suspension, an Old Trafford date against either Liverpool or Manchester City, depending on wether Sky Sports would move the game against Liverpool back to October 1st.

A United fan was fined £500 for producing Manchester United branded aftershave without the club’s consent.

Gary Neville was the subject of a brief interview after a breakthrough year where he broke into United’s team and made his England debut.

There was a fixture list for 95/96, while an advert appeared to reveal United’s new away kit would be unveiled on 1st August. It turned out the be the infamous grey kit.

There was six pages of coverage of Paul Ince and Mark Hughes departures, looking back at their time with United.

There is a four page profile of the forthcoming European competitions, as United aimed to win the UEFA Cup for the first time. They went out in the 1st Round on away goals to Rotor Volgograd.

There is a double page feature on United Supporters Clubs around the world, in countries such as Wales, USA, Germany and Belgium.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 3.3.1979

Lou Macari is the cover star of this edition of Shoot, which features action from the recent European Championship Qualifier between England and Northern Ireland.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread assessing West Brom’s chances of winning the title, canvassing players from three rival clubs.

Martin Dobson of Everton says they won’t, while Ian Wallace (Coventry City) and Viv Anderson (Nottingham Forest) say they can. Dobson would be proved right.

In news, Liverpool are adding extra seats at Anfield, while Warren Feeney scored twice for Linfield against his former club Glentoran.

Ray Clemence uses his column to comment on the modern game, that defenders need to make their contribution in the goalscoring department.

Jim McCalliog is interviewed about football in the USA having recently played there, declaring it to be 4th Division standard and not recommending it for English players.

England’s recent 4-0 win over Northern Ireland gets four pages of coverage, with England manager Ron Greenwood still considering Northern Ireland to be a danger to his side’s chances of qualifying.

Elsewhere, there was a full page asking if the England team is too old.

In foreign news, France are in danger of not reaching Euro 80, and some fans are calling for a change in manager.

Elswehere, Dino Zoff is interviewed and states that he has no plans to retire. Good choice, ad he won the World Cup in 1982.

QPR are the subjects of this week’s Club Spotlight, including a centre page poster.

Gordon Hill uses his column to discuss the PFA Player Of The Year Award, stating that he has voted for Garry Birtles as Young Player Of The Year.

Ahead of the Tyne/Wear Derby, John Bird and Mike Docherty preview it. Sunderland won the game 4-1 but neither side ended up winning promotion that season.

With the 1980s approaching, Danny McGrain uses his column to look back at Scottish football stars of the 1960s.

Staying in Scotland, Shoot does a two page feature asking if English clubs are exploiting the Scottish transfer market to sign players for bargain prices.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : CHARLES BUCHAN’S FOOTBALL MONTHLY – MARCH 1970

Leeds United v Manchester City is the cover image of Charles Buchan’s Football Monthly, two clubs who are chasing European glory, as there is still a possibility of UK clubs winning all three European trophies. That possibility gets a double page feature.

The draw for the World Cup has just taken place, and the tournament gets previewed, with Brazil’s defence being highlighted as a possible weakness.

There are recent reports from England’s recent friendly with Holland and some European games.

West Bromwich Albion face Manchester City in the League Cup Final, and this game gets a four page preview.

There is a profile of Doncaster manager Lawrie McMenemy, who is one of the youngest managers in the Football League.

There is a profile of football in Merseyside, looking at the meetings between Everton and Liverpool since Liverpool got promoted to the First Division in 1962.

With the World Cup approaching, there is a profile of Morocco, representing Africa, with the writer expecting that an African team will win the World Cup by the year 2000.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : CHARLES BUCHAN’S FOOTBALL MONTHLY – JUNE 1971

Match action from Liverpool against Everton is the cover image of Charles Buchan’s Football Monthly as the summer of 1971 has arrived.

Alex Stepney of Manchester United tells about his most embarrassing moment on a football pitch, the time he conceded a goal to Pat Jennings in the 1967 Charity Shield.

There is a profile of Steve Heighway of Liverpool who is described as exploding a myth that footballers can’t combine a football career with education.

Inter-League matches are the subject of a full page article calling for them to be scrapped as they are outdated.

There is a profile of veteran Dave Mackay, who aims to help Swindon Town into Division One for the first time in their history.

There is a review of the Texaco Cup, looking at the difference in quality between English and Scottish clubs.

In foreign news, Pele is a star attraction in France after Santos played a friendly in Paris against an All Star XI.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – SEPTEMBER 2011

A trio of English players – Stewart Downing, Jordan Henderson (Liverpool) and Phil Jones (Manchester United) are the cover stars of When Saturday Comes, incredulously questioning each other’s recent big money transfers.

The South-West of England gets profiled, most specifically Devon, with the fortunes of Exeter City, Plymouth Argyle, Truro City and Torquay being the subject of a full page article.

The future location of Liverpool is the subject of a feature, as the club debates wether to stay at Anfield or move to a new stadium.

Steve McLaren gets profiled as he aims to rebuild his reputation, having just been appointed the new manager of Nottingham Forest. He only stayed in the job until October.

There is a look at the role of Social Media in modern football, after a Norwich City supporter had become the first supporter to be banned from a football ground, after posting racist tweets about a Norwich player.

AFC Wimbledon are the subject of this month’s Photo Feature, having been promoted to the Football League for the first time in their history, just nine years after being formed.

With there being no men’s tournament this year, it was the Women’s World Cup that occupied supporter’s attention during 2011, with a review of this tournament being featured.

With it being the summer, there is a look back at a bygone age when footballers kept themselves fit during the summer by playing cricket.

There is a look at Carlos Tevez career in England as he looks set to leave Manchester City. He didn’t leave City that summer, but did have a six month exile during the 2011-2012 season, before eventually leaving for Italy in 2013.

There are three pages dedicated to the Match Of The Month, this month was the UEFA Cup tie between Crusaders and Fulham, written by BBC Northern Ireland journalist Robbie Meredith.

There is a review of the recent Copa America, focusing on the performances of Argentina and Brazil.

Staying in South America, there is a fond look back on Argetnine attacker Walter Rojas short spell in Scotland, 20 years after signing for Dundee United.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 24.3.1984

It’s the League Cup Final, and this is reflected with both Everton and Liverpool being represented on the cover. Both teams are looking to make history. Liverpool by winning the trophy in four successive seasons, and Everton to win it for the first time.

The match gets a four page preview, with a series of top flight stars being canvassed for their opinion, and the consensus is that Everton will win.

There is a profile of Matchman Of The month, Davie Cooper of Rangers.

Also getting profiled is new Aston Villa signing Steve Foster, who is happy with the move as it means he won’t have to play against Peter Withe, who he rates as his toughest opponent.

Match assesses form of Liverpool and Everton in this season’s League Cup, based on the player ratings in Match Facts, with Everton edging out Liverpool by a score of 6.81 to 6.77.

Plymouth Argyle get profiled as they dream of a trip to Wembley after putting Derby County out of the FA Cup, with a Semi-Final against Watford at Villa Park standing in the way.

It’s also the League Cup Final in Scotland, with the game between Rangers and Celtic getting a double page preview. There is also a poster of Robert Prytz of Rangers.

Ratings seem to be a theme in this magazine, as Glenn Hoddle gets a go at rating Everton and Liverpool’s players.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mark Lawrenson, who says he wants to be a Commentator when he retires.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JANUARY 1986

Bryan Robson is the cover star of the first World Soccer of 1986, a year he hopes will bring him glory for club and country, neither of which have celebrated glory since the 1960s.

The draw for the 1986 World Cup has taken place, the first World Cup where final group games are played simultaneously, amid complaints of travelling between stadiums.

This draw gets plenty of coverage. The group stages sees Italy and Argentina paired together, the 4th successive World Cup they would meet each other.

There is a feature on Canada captain Bruce Wilson, who finds himself without a club six months before the tournament, while Morocco get a profile.

There is a double page report on Juventus, who have just won the World Club after beating Argentinos Juniors on penalties.

There is a feature on European Cup Quarter-Finalists Steau Bucharest.

In Austria, Bruno Pezzey has been appointed captain of the national side, as they aim to qualify for Euro 88.

In England, it looked like Manchester United were going to run away with the title, but have been pulled back by Liverpool after a series of bad results.

Malcolm Allison has the World Cup on his mind, but the 1990 one, having been appointed manager of Kuwait.

In Turkey, there is unrest at Fenerbache, with players protesting at bonuses that were promised to the squad not being paid.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.3.1986

Sheffield Wednesday’s on form striker Garry Thompson is the cover star, in a week where Shoot speculates that Manchester United might be trying to sign Sammy Lee from Liverpool.

Lee is the subject of a double page feature, where he states he is aiming to make up for lost time after a disappointing 84-85 due to injuries and loss of form.

Lee was linked with Manchester United by Shoot, whose Danish defender John Sivebaek has revealed he joined United for money, while manager Ron Atkinson revealed that it was his goal against Republic Of Ireland in a World Cup Qualifier which prompted United to sign him, beating off competition from Spurs, Celtic, Atletico Madrid and Club Brugge.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot looks at the chances of those wanting to go. They did a report on Terry Fenwick’s performance during QPR’s 1-1 draw with Luton, concluding that he is being wasted in midfield.

One player not going to Mexico was Remi Moses, who would be missing out through injury. Bryan Robson writes about this in his column, and also states that Mark Hughes wants to stay at Manchester United, and then promotes his fan club, which you can join for £3.50 a year if you live in the British Isles.

In news, Reading’s Andy Rogers was saved by the club’s physio after he collapsed during a recent game.

Two youngsters getting full page profiles were Nigel Spackman (Chelsea) and Paul Stephenson (Newcastle United)

Shoot reports that Barcelona are looking at Mark Hughes, while Gary Williams is set to leave Aston Villa after a bust-up with manager Graham Turner.

One player agreeing with his manager was Peter Rhoades-Brown of Oxford, whos manager Maurice Evans described him as inconsistent.

Jimmy Greaves Star Letter comes from a Scotland fan complaining that it was unfair that Belgoium were considering playing their Euro 88 Qualifier against Scotland to a neutral country, due to the fear of hooliganism.

John Bond gets a double page spread, with the recently appointed Birmingham City manager stating that he can revive the club. They were relegated in 1986, and almost get relegated again in 1987, before Bond was sacked.

In foreign news, Andreas Brehme has signed a pre-contract with Bayern Munich, while Janusz Torowski and Jaroslaw Biernat have both signed for Eintracht Frankfurt, but won’t be going to the World Cup, having claimed asylum in West Germany.

Shoot is in the World Cup mood, doing a double page feature on Denmark, comparing them to the Holland side of 1974 and 1978.

Peter Davenport’s chances of going to Mexico received an endorsement from his manager at Nottingham Forest, Brian Clough, who wrote a column to urge England manager Bobby Robson to put him on the plane.

Talking of managers, Kenny Dalglish picked up his first Manager Of The Month award, but defeat to Everton ruined his day when he was presented with the award.

A future manager, was Alan Curbishley of Charlton, who was on the pitch for them in 1986, leading their promotion charge as they aimed to reach the top flight for the first time since 1957.

In Scotland, a former Rangers man has done Celtic a favour, as Mo Johnston has had a run of form kickstarted by being dropped from the Scotland squad by Alex Ferguson.

Brighton get a full page profile, as they aim to be promoted back to the top flight after being relegated in 1983.

Returning to Scotland, Shoot previewed the Scottish Cup Quarter-Finals between Hibs and Celtic, and Aberdeen v Dundee. At the time of going to print, they were the only two Quarter-Finals definitely confirmed.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.5.1977

David O’Leary is one of the cover stars as the 1976-1977 nears it’s finale.

Jack Charlton (Middlesbrough) and Johnny Giles (West Bromwich Albion) get a double page feature, as the two former Leeds players have left managerial positions in recent weeks.

Ray Kennedy gets a full page profile, as he aims to make English football history, aiming to become the first player to win the double twice, having been a part of Arsenal’s 1971 double winning team.

With Liverpool losing to Manchester United in that year’s FA Cup Final, the feat wasn’t achieve until various Manchester United players did it in 1996, with some more doing it in 1999 (Peter Schmeichel, Denis Irwin, Roy Keane and Ryan Giggs winning it three times)

Ashley Cole and Nicholas Anelka are the only players to win the double with two different clubs, after Kennedy was denied this achievement.

Shoot does a double page spread, offering Martin Peters, Pat Rice and Howard Kendall an opportunity to reflect on the season, and why their respective sides didn’t win a trophy.

Gerry Francis uses his column to suggest that anybody wanting to be a manager in England should get the relevant coaching and management qualifications, similar to the structure in West Germany.

In news, Arsenal manager Terry Neill has denied a story in Shoot that Frank Stapleton and Liam Brady are on their way to Liverpool. Middlesbrough midfielder Graeme Souness is unsettled at Ayresome Park

St Mirren manager Alex Ferguson has been fined £25 for comments to the referee after his side were eliminated from the Scottish Cup by Motherwell.

Aston Villa goalkeeper John Burridge gets a full page profile about facing penalties.

In the centre pages, there is a poster of the Aston Villa team, including the League Cup, which they won in 1977.

John Greig uses his column to explain why Rangers didn’t win the league.

Sheffield Wednesday’s teenage goalkeeper Chris Turner gets interviewed, having broke into the team and become a regular of the team he supported growing up.

In world news, Idi Amin is described as “The Generous General”, having rewarded the national team with a free holiday in Libya as a reward for winning the East African Challenge Cup.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.12.1985

Paul Walsh of Liverpool is the cover star of Shoot as 1985 approaches Christmas.

In a double page interview, Walsh reveals he was conned into staying at Anfield, and has now been rewarded with an extended run in the team, and is eyeing up a place in England’s World Cup squad.

In news, Chris Turner wants to leave Manchester United due to a lack of first-team opportunities. Across Manchester, City defender Mick McCarthy has been out injured, rumoured to have been suffered in a sprint with an Irish journalist who had £20 bet he could beat him in a race, in the build-up to a recent international.

Staying in the Republic Of Ireland, their state broadcaster has signed a deal to broadcast English games at 3pm on a Saturday, much to the anger of clubs in Northern Ireland, where many people can pick up RTE.

Bryan Robson uses his column to discuss the best and worst referees in England.

Steve Foster gets a double page interview, where he states that Bobby Robson is scared of him because of his reputation, which is why he isn’t getting called up for the England squad.

In Scotland, Davie Dodds had a novel way to beat his goal drought, by dropping back into midfield. It worked, as he hit the back of the net in a recent 3-0 win over Celtic.

Jimmy Greaves gave his Star Letter Award to Mr N Bate of Cambridge, who complains about England not being seeded for the forthcoming World Cup Finals.

Greaves also uses his letters page to say that he was sick and tired of talk of a proposed breakaway Super League in English football.

It would turn out to be prophetic. When the Premier League was formed in 1992, ITV lost the rights, and Saint and Greavsie were no more.

Gary Mabbutt gets a full page profile for his versatility, with opinions varying as to where he fits best on the football pitch.

Across North London, Paul Davis says he doesn’t feel like a first team player at Arsenal, despite playing over 100 games, and has become more competitive in a bit to avoid being dropped.

Ipswich Town are the club who get a profile this week, currently struggling in the top flight.

Staying in East Anglia, Steve Bruce of Norwich City is desperate for the club to return to the top flight having been relegated the previous season, having spent seven years trying to reach it, before joining Norwich from Gillingham, only to be relegated after a season.

The magazine ends with a profile of Tony Dorigo, who reveals that his favourite singers are Bryan Ferry and Stevie Wonder, while his ambition for 1986 is to get an England Under 21 call-up when he gets British citizenship in October.