MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – MAY 1986

Gary Lineker is the cover star of this edition of Football Monthly in the early summer of 1986 as the World Cup in Mexico nears.

The editorial focuses on that World Cup, commenting that England, Northern Ireland and Scotland will be at a disadvantage due to a lack of preparation time due to club commitments.

England’s warm up friendly away to Soviet Union, a 1-0 win in Tblisi, gets a double page feature.

Meanwhile, Real Madrid were celebrating after winning their first title in six years.

Oxford United’s win over QPR in the recent League Cup Final gets a four page feature, including a team poster in the centre spread.

Also celebrating were Justin Finch and Darrell Dunscombe, who were crowned UK Subbutteo Champions, the tournament getting a full page of coverage.

Having just signed for Barcelona, there is a full page feature on the career so far of Mark Hughes.

Bryan Hamilton gets a full page interview as he aims to steer Wigan Athletic towards Division Two.

As the World Cup gets closer, there is a four page preview of Group F, which features England.

Ian McShane also looks forward to the World Cup, even though he will miss a lot of it due to filming commitments for the new series of Lovejoy, revealing that he travelled to Mexico to watch England when the World Cup was last there in 1970.

In Scotland, Alex Ferguson is facing the agonising decision of having to leave players out of his squad as he is set to decide who does and doesn’t go to Mexico.

Jack Charlton began his reign as Republic of Ireland manager with a defeat to Wales, while Martin Harvey will be back in Northern Ireland’s coaching staff in Mexico.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 8.5.1993

Paul Ince, accompanied by the headline “JUST CHAMPION!” is the cover star of Shoot, as Manchester United have just won their first league title in 26 years.

The title success must have come too late for Shoot’s printing deadlines, as there was no features about it in the magazine.

On the inside cover, there is a poster of three of Juventus stars – Roberto Baggio, Gianluca Vialli and Roberto Baggio. Curiously, Baggio was pictured in action for Italy.

In news, Brian Clough has announced his retirement, and Shoot prints various tributes from players and managers.

Crystal Palace returned a lot of their allocation of tickets for the FA Cup Final, with Chairman Ron Noades requesting that the FA redistribute them equally to fans of the two finalists, Arsenal and Sheffield Wednesday.

Marco Van Basten has said that Manchester United are equipped to dominate European football for years to come, adding that the prospect of them playing in the following season’s European Cup is “An exciting prospect, but also a frightening one”

Coca-Cola’s official statistics pack for the Coca-Cola Cup (League Cup) Final listed Sheffield Wednesday’s Chris Bart-Williams as Chris Bart-Simpson.

Cyrille Regis could be heading back to West Brom after being free transferred by Aston Villa.

There are rumours of departures at Manchester City, with Niall Quinn (Porto), David White (Aston Villa) and Keith Curle (Sheffield Wednesday) all attracting interest from other clubs.

Manager Peter Reid could also be on the move, as his friendship with Liverpool Chairman David Moores could make him a candidate for the manager’s job at Anfield if Graeme Souness is sacked. Reid was sacked by City in August after a poor start to the following season.

Aston Villa Chairman Doug Ellis has refused to allow Villa Park to be used to host a testimonial game for the club’s European Cup winning manager Tony Barton. Barton died in August that year.

Liverpool and Leeds began the season at Wembley in the Charity Shield, and endured miserable seasons. Shoot gives two pages looking at where it went wrong for them both.

Colin Cooper has told Milwall he doesn’t want to be sold. He was that summer, to Nottingham Forest.

Ally McCoist, already scored 50 goals this season, gets a double page tribute.

Stoke City, promoted from the Second Division (Third Tier) get a feature, where they already have ambitions of reaching the Premier League. They wouldn’t achieve it until 2008.

Grantley Dicks of Bath City gets a feature, mostly about his disciplinary record which matches that of his brother Julian.

Jimmy Greaves letters sees him admit he was wrong that Eric Cantona would be a bad signing for Manchester United, and announce he will be co-hosting (with Ian St John, of course) a show called Sporting Questions, a sporting version of Question Time.

In foreign news, Andy Herzog has a curious goalscoring motivation – his uncle sends his Austrian cakes when he scores, and dog food when he doesn’t. Marco Van Basten has given AC Milan a boost by returning in time for the title run-in, while in Spain, Sevilla’s two Diegos – Simeone and Maradona are in trouble for not attending a Spanish FA disciplinary hearing after a brawl against Cadiz. Both players were believed to be on holiday.

The was also a competition to win a VHS of 501 German Goals.

Peter Ndlovu gets a two page feature, focusing on his travels to play for Zimbabwe in World Cup and African Nations Cup Qualifiers.

Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, with tributes from team-mates and opponents, having become the 10th player to score 100 goals for Manchester United. He would have another milestone coming up, having just won his 49th cap for Wales.

Scotland have suffered their biggest defeat in 18 years and are certain to miss their first World Cup since 1970. Staying in Scotland, Jimmy Nicholl has announced his retirement from playing to concentrate on managing Raith Rovers. Nicholl had been linked with the Northern Ireland manager’s job, as Billy Bingham was expected to retirement in the summer of 1993.

Bingham did retire in November 1993, and Nicholl was interviewed for the post but was unsuccessful. He tried again in 2004, and was again unsuccessful.

Shoot announces the result of a recent Teletext poll to reveal Britain’s Most Fervent Derby. The winner was Rangers v Celtic with 18%, beating Newcastle v Sunderland (12%)

Linfield v Glentoran polled 2%.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 19.5.1984

It’s the FA Cup Final, as Everton and Watford take centre stage on this week’s copy of Match.

There is fighting talk from both teams. Peter Reid states that there is no way Watford will score against Neville Southall, while Mo Johnston is determined to win the cup for suspended captain Wilf Rostrun, and let him lead out the team at Wembley in the following season’s Charity Shield.

Chelsea get a double page feature, having just been promoted to the top flight of English football after an absence of five years.

In foreign news, Juventus have been rocked by the news that Claudio Gentile might be leaving the club in the summer.

Staying in Italy, Luther Blissett of AC Milan tells Match how delighted he is to have been recalled to the England squad.

In preparation of that summer’s European Championship, Match is previewing the teams, with Romania, written down as “Rumania” being this week’s subject.

Graeme Souness uses his column to preview the FA Cup Final, declaring that he can’t see Everton losing.

Andy Gray and George Reilly are profiled, with Gray revealing his favourite singer is Rod Stewart, and that his personal ambition is to have an uneventful private life.

George Reilly’s favourite pop star is Bryan Ferry.

Mark Hughes gets profiled, having broken into Manchester United’s first team this season, revealing that he thought he would have to leave United in order to advance his career.

A team-mate of Hughes in the future will be Gordon Strachan, who is set to join United from Aberdeen, with his last game for the club being the Scottish Cup Final against Celtic, a game Aberdeen will lose according to Hibs goalkeeper Alan Rough, previewing the game for Match.

It had been suggested that Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson has been mellowing, but he told Match that his wife had told him to behave himself.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1985

Glenn Hoddle of England is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Or perhaps, not of England, if the headline is anything to go by.

This was also the week in Back To The Future II where Marty McFly visits 2015.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Steve McMahon, who has just joined Liverpool from Aston Villa, nearly three years after rejecting Liverpool to go to Villa Park.

Meanwhile, there are reports that England’s top clubs could be forming a breakaway Super League.

Cover star Glenn Hoddle is interviewed, finally becoming an England regular, and is confident of returning home from Mexico the following summer with the World Cup.

The cover headline “I’LL QUIT ENGLAND” refers to his club status, as he expresses his desire to play on the continent, which he did in 1987 when he signed for Monaco.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that Peter Barnes is worthy of a place in the England squad to provide competition for John Barnes and Chris Waddle.

Northern Ireland’s vital World Cup Qualifier away to Romania gets previewed, with manager Billy Bingham confidently predicting that Northern Ireland will finish 2nd in their group and head to Mexico.

Republic Of Ireland also have ambitions of going to Mexico, and have blooded Tony Cascarino into their squad in time for their vital game away to the Soviet Union.

Portsmouth manager Alan Ball gets a photo collage, as he aims to lead the club back to the top flight of English football.

Peter Shilton gets a double page feature as he becomes England’s most capped goalkeeper, complete with a tribute from Gordon Banks, who he replaced at Leicester City, Stoke City and England, with the headline “PETER SHILTON – KING OF KEEPERS”

West Germany manager Franz Beckenabauer feels this season’s European club competitions have been devalued by the absence of English clubs, while Canada have qualified for the World Cup for the first time in their history.

Meanwhile, Napoli failed in their bid to sign Hugo Maradona from Argentinos Juniors, the younger brother of Diego Maradona.

A dispute between the governing body and broadcasters meant that there were no games on TV, so Shoot did a double page photo collage of the best strikes.

In Scotland, there is a full page profile and a poster of Celtic.

In Wales, Mark Hughes was set to miss the opening games of Euro 88 Qualifying, due to a red card in an underage Euro qualifier against Yugoslavia in 1983.

Steve Cowan gets a full page feature, having just signed for Hibs and is hoping to put his injury problems behind him.

Bradford City get featured, as the club tries to recover from the tragic fire at their ground five months earlier.

Peter Reid uses his column to talk about Everton’s problems conceding goals, especially in the early moments of games.

Reid’s Everton team-mate Gary Lineker is happy, having found a Snooker Club near his home in Southport, and has managed to convince Willie Thorne to start supporting Everton.

Meanwhile, Portsmouth are trying to sign Paul Mariner from Arsenal.

The magazine ends with a profile of Davie McPherson of Rangers. His favourite music is Dire Straits and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.4.1992

Teddy Sheringham is the cover star of an edition of Shoot edited by John Fashanu, looking forward to the League Cup Final between Nottingham Forest and Manchester United, with United represented on the cover with an inset photo of Mark Hughes.

Curiously, Sheringham and Hughes were on opposing sides in the League Cup Final a decade later, with Hughes being on the winning side in both games.

Gordon Strachan hits back at critics of the quality of English football by listing six players that are top quality – Roy Keane, David Hirst, Carlton Palmer, Alan Shearer, Rob Jones and Andy Sinton, revealing that Ron Atkinson was looking at signing Jones when he was United manager.

John Fashanu gets a double page feature where he guest edits Shoot.

In letters, one reader thinks it is time for Tim Flowers to be given a chance for England.

In international news, it’s all about departures, or possible departures, with Hugo Sanchez possibly leaving Real Madrid, Darko Pancev leaving Red Star Belgrade for Inter Milan and Sven Goran Eriksson leaving Benfica for Sampdoria.

Shoot dedicates 8 pages to the League Cup Final with interviews with Paul Ince, Mark Hughes, Nigel Clough and Andy Marriott. Guest editor John Fashanu gives his verdict, a victory for Nottingham Forest. Manchester United won 1-0.

Middlesbrough defender Alan Kernaghan is interviewed, wanting promotion to the top flight and a Northern Ireland cap in 1992, while revealing that he most famous person outside of football he has met was his late uncle, Jackie Wright, Benny Hill’s sidekick.

The magazine ends with a double page spread on Gerry Creaney, dubbed “Scottish football’s new Golden Boy”

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10.5.1986

The 1985-1986 season is nearing it’s end, and Malcolm Shotton of Oxford United is the cover star of Shoot, with the club having won their first major piece of silverware, the League Cup, after a 3-0 win over QPR.

Mark Hughes talks about his transfer from Manchester United to Barcelona, admitting that he should have done what Kevin Keegan did when leaving Liverpool, announce his plans to leave at the start of the season, as the protracted move turned out to be a distraction.

Hughes signed an 8 year contract with Barcelona, and he says this will be his only club on the continent. As it turned out, he did emulate Kevin Keegan, by playing in Germany, joining Bayern Munich on loan, before returning to Old Trafford in 1988. He never played for a club on the continent in the final 14 years of his career.

In adverts, there’s an advert for the following week’s edition, which has a free World Cup stickerbook, as well as previews of the FA and Scottish Cup Finals.

Bryan Robson uses his column to sing the praises of Paul McGrath, stating that he wishes he was English as he’d walk into their defence. He comments on his top 11 players of the season.

Shoot previews the three European Finals, singing the praises of Terry Venables, who Shoot believes is set to become Barcelona’s first European Cup winning manager, totally dismissing the chances of their opponents Steaua Bucharest.

Shoot does a double page photo collage of the recent League Cup Final, where Oxford beat QPR 3-0.

Peter Reid writes in his column that Everton have the grit to win the title.

Reid is also complimentary of West Ham, whose young defender George Parris gets profiled, described as “A new Billy Bonds”

Andy Goram, a recent debutant for Scotland, despite being born in England, tells Shoot he wants to join a club in Scotland.

Football in Sheffield gets a double page spread, as both clubs yo-yo between divisions, with Shoot pointing out that there hasn’t been a top flight Derby between United and Wednesday in 18 years.

Bruce Rioch gets interviewed after just being appointed manager of Middlesbrough, talking about what he has learnt from managers in his career, especially Tommy Docherty.

Iraq get a preview ahead of Mexico 86, with their style of play moulded by the influx of British managers in the Middle East in the late 70s, and the current Brazilian manager they have, Edu (not the ex Arsenal player), who is Zico’s brother.

Davie Cooper is interviewed, stating that the appointment of Graeme Souness as manager was a “Bombshell”, but is a top class appointment.

Dual nationality Vince Mennie of Dundee is interviewed, stating that he wants a call-up to the Scotland team, and turned down an Under 21 call-up for West Germany in order to achieve his dream.

Ron Saunders has responded to West Brom’s relegation by having a clear-out of his squad.

Staying in the West Midlands, Birmingham City manager John Bond has appealed to local businesses for help to secure funding to bring Trevor Francis back to St Andrews.

The magazine ends with a double page profile of Sandy Jardine, aiming to win the Scottish League and Scottish Cup with Hearts, 14 years after winning the 1972 European Cup Winners Cup with Rangers.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.2.1986

The other way around from the movie series, it is Bond sending rather than receiving an SOS, as Birmingham City manager John Bond wants to bring cover star Trevor Francis beck to St Andrews from Sampdoria.

As you open the magazine, Mark Hughes tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Manchester United, amidst rumours of a move to Barcelona.

In news, Terry Venables is linked with a move to Spurs at the end of the season, while leaving White Hart Lane could be Ally Dick, linked with a move to Hibs.

In World Cup news, Billy Bingham hits back at criticism of Northern Ireland’s preparation being against heavyweight sides such as Denmark and France, while Scotland manager Alex Ferguson has added Archie Knox and Craig Brown to his backroom staff for their campaign in Mexico.

Cover star Francis tells Shoot he is still available for England, having missed a recent friendly due to injury, and suggests he could create a place for himself in right midfield in Mexico.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that the recent signing of Terry Gibson could be a boost for Manchester United in the title race.

In Scotland, Falkirk winger Jimmy Gilmour is playing so well, he is drawing comparisons to his uncle, former Celtic winger Jimmy Johnstone.

Crystal Palace manager Steve Coppell, only 30, tells Shoot that his side have had to change their style of play in order to get results, after previously missing out despite playing well.

Having saved Manchester City and Swansea City from relegation, John Bond is looking for a hat-trick by keeping Birmingham City up. In order to do this, he tells Shoot he wants to bring Trevor Francis back to the club, after Francis left to join Nottingham Forest in 1979 in England’s first £1m transfer.

Gary Mabbutt gets scouted by Shoot during Tottenham Hotspur’s match against Nottingham Forest, stating that he was exposed against a striker like Peter Davenport.

Back to Scotland, and Aberdeen’s John Hewitt tells Shoot that Dons manager Alex Ferguson is hard to please.

West Brom’s George Reilly tells Shoot he is happy at The Hawthorns after a short spell at Newcastle United.

Kenny Swain tells Shoot that he believes his experience of winning the title with Aston Villa in 1981 will help Portsmouth as they aim to get promoted to the top flight for the first time in 27 years.

West Ham goalkeeper Phil Parkes is having the best season of his career, and owes it to giving up booze after a drink driving ban in January 1985.

Ian Rush uses his column to praise his Liverpool team-mate Sammy Lee, who is celebrating his 27th birthday thsi week.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a double page spread on how Sunderland fans are losing patience with Lawrie McMenemy, after failing to launch a promotion bid.

The magazine ends with a “Focus On …..” Gordon Durie. His favourite bands are Depeche Mode and Simple Minds.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 19.10.1985

Running away with the league title, Mark Hughes is the cover star as Match asks if this is Untied’s best ever team.

Also making a good start was Reading, who secured the record for most successive wins at the start of the season with a win at Newport, and they get three pages.

Frank McAvennie gets a full page profile, with opposing players who have faced West Ham giving their opinions of him, after 10 goals in his first 11 games for West Ham.

Former Manchester United manager Tommy Docherty gets asked to compare the current United team with their European Cup winning side of the 1960s, giving each player a mark out of 10, with the 1985 team winning 98 to 89.

In Scotland, the East Terracing at Hampden Park will be renamed the Jock Stein Stand in memory of the former Scotland manager, who died recently.

Aberdeen, Dundee United and St Mirren are all flying the flag for Scottish football in Europe this week.

Also in European competition, Bangor City of Wales have hit the jackpot after being drawn against Spanish giants Atletico Madrid.

Glenn Roeder of Newcastle United gets asks about his favourites, and his favourite cartoon character is The Pink Panther.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1981

Liam Brady, sipping from a bottle of water (a glass bottle as well, no health and safety in them days), is the cover star of Shoot, as he adjusts to life in Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Brady, who has so far been a resounding success at Juventus.

In a bid to improve their style of play, Coventry City have banned their players from passing the ball back to their goalkeeper, while the National Hairdressers Federation have voted Lawrie McMenemy as Head Of The Year, alongside Felicity Kendall.

Derek Johnstone uses his column to comment on how Rangers have missed European football in 1980-1981, and are desperate for it to return to Ibrox in 1981-1982, as he reflects on his favourite memories taking on continental opposition.

Another Scotsman with a column is Andy Gray, who states that he is baffled by Wolves recent poor form.

The recent PFA Awards get covered, as John Wark wins Player Of The Year, and Gary Shaw wings Young Player Of The Year.

Ray Clemence’s column analyses the recent League Cup Final between Liverpool and West Ham, which finished 1-1, with a replay due to be played at Villa Park this week. That match gets profiled a few pages over.

Shoot profiles two former England players trying to have success as a manager, Larry Lloyd of Wigan and Norman Hunter of Barnsley, while new Bristol City goalkeeper Jan Moller says he wants to be as good as Peter Shilton, the goalkeeper at the opposition end of the pitch in the 1979 European Cup Final.

Another foreigner in England getting profiled is Bosco Jankovic of Middlesbrough, whose contract is expiring, and he has decide wether to stay in England or return to Yugoslavia.

Diego Maradona gets a profile after becoming the world’s first £4m player when he moved from Argentinos to Boca Juniors.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to write about three young strikers at Manchester United he believes will be big stars in the future – Norman Whiteside, Mark Hughes and Scott McGarvey. Two out of three ain’t bad.

Four footballing figures get interviewed on how to improve the game. West Bromwich Albion manager Ron Atkinson is not in favour of Sunday football, but is in favour of three points for a win.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve Moran of Southampton, who reveals that his favourite music is Mike Oldfield and Diana Ross.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.10.1986

Mark Hughes, in the early months of his first season at Barcelona, is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot.

His fellow cover star Kerry Dixon is fighting back at critics who criticised his performance in England’s recent friendly defeat against Sweden.

Dixon will be on your TV screens at the weekend as his Chelsea team take on Manchester United, with United goalkeeper wanting revenge for the previous season’s defeat to Chelsea at Old Trafford during the title run-in. The previous season’s meeting was between two teams at the top, this time around it’s between teams in the bottom half.

In news, John Wark is wanted by Hearts, Aberdeen and Norwich, while Mickey Thomas is wanted by Wichita Wings in North America.

One man who did move was Kevin Richardson, who moved from Everton to Watford, and got a phone call from Elton John welcoming him to the club, and believed it was a wind-up from his former Everton team-mates.

Everton supporters with a tenner spare could join their Fan Club, advertised in this edition.

There were plans for a testimonial for Pat Jennings before the end of 1986 at Windsor Park between an All-Star British XI to take on a European XI.

In the editor’s column, editor Peter Stewart rubbishes the idea of a proposed “Super League”, pointing to the success of smaller clubs such as Wimbledon, Oxford and Charlton.

The same column also praises Luton Town for their ban on away supporters at Kenilworth Road, as they aim to combat hooliganism.

Brian Clough tells Shoot that he doesn’t want Forest star Franz Carr to get an England call-up, because his former club Blackburn will be due a payment as part of the transfer arrangement.

Talking of England, they’ve been invited to a tournament of former World Cup winners in Brazil in 1989 to commemorate 75 years of football in Brazil. England were paired in the same group as Brazil and Uruguay.

It was a tournament that Enzo Bearzot, Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning manager, won’t be taking part in, having just resigned from his role as national team manager.

Mark Wright is on the comeback trail after an injury during Southampton’s FA Cup Semi-Final against Liverpool which ruled him out of the World Cup in Mexico. He talks to Shoot about his experiences coming back from injury.

In Glasgow, it is young players that are the talk of the town, with Shoot doing a feature on breakthrough stars Tony Shepherd (Celtic), Ian Durrant and Derek Ferguson (Rangers)

Another (relative) youngster making a mark was 32 year old Wolves manager Brian Little, who gets a double page spread in what Shoot describe as “Football’s hardest job”

Cover star Mark Hughes gets a double page feature, where he lists his favourite things. Since you ask, his favourite bands are The Jam and U2.

Also getting a double page profile are Derby County, who Shoot describe as “on the march”, and so it proved as they got promoted to Division One in 1987.

The magazine ends with Charlie Nicholas uses his column to urge Scotland fans to stand by newly appointed manager Andy Roxburgh after a disappointing start to their Euro 88 Qualifying campaign.