MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 12.5.1990

Later today, Alan Pardew will lead out Crystal Palace for the FA Cup Final. In 1990, he was playing for Crystal Palace, appearing on the cover of Match with current Stoke City manager Mark Hughes, then a Manchester United player, with the FA Cup sandwiched inbetween them.

As you open the magazine, Mark Bright is interviewed, urging Crystal Palace to make him a contract offer he can’t refuse, amid speculation over his future.

Across the page, Gary Pallister is interviewed, stating the the FA Cup offers a lifeline to a disappointing season for both him and United.

In traditional cup final fashion, the teams get profiled by a team-mate, Gary O’Reilly for Palace and Mike Phelan for United.

Phelan reveals that Steve Bruce is known as “Empty head” due to knowing a lot of useless facts, and Paul Ince is known as “Mr Quote” due to his love of speaking to the press.

In news, Ronnie Rosenthal states he won’t be returning to Standard Liege for the following season, with Liverpool, where he on loan, being his preferred destination.

It’s also Cup Final Day in Scotland, where Celtic face Aberdeen, and this gets a double page profile.

With the World Cup in Italy approaching, Match looks at those players with ambitions of being on the plane, and the choices Bobby Robson has to make.

Ally McCoist gets a profile, where he reveals a fondness for Brooke Shields, a fear of Spiders, and that his favourite thing about Match is photos of Ally McCoist.

In Match Facts, 18 year old Mark Bosnich made what Match described as a “reasonable” debut for Manchester United in a 0-0 draw with Wimbledon.

In their foreign round-up, Napoli win Serie A, but their star player Diego Maradona wants to leave and join Marseille.

As part of their World Cup preview, South Korea get a double page profile.

The magazine ends with a double page profile on Paul Gascoigne, as Match assesses his performance against Czechoslovakia in one of England’s warm-up games.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 7.12.1985

Pat Jennings is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, celebrating a clean sheet at Wembley in a 0-0 draw between England and Northern Ireland that was enough to send Northern Ireland to the 1986 World Cup.

England were the only unbeaten team in European qualification, and Bryan Robson uses his column to compliment the players who helped England get there, such as Gary Stevens, Paul Bracewell and suggests that Peter Barnes could be a long shot for the squad.

Shoot gives a double page photo spread to Pat Jennings and his saves that secured Northern Ireland the draw at Wembley they needed to qualify.

Terry Butcher will be a key man for England in Mexico, and gets a double page spread as he returns from injury, aiming to keep Ipswich in the top flight.

Alan Ball is the subject of a new series where Shoot collates quotes about a famous footballing figure, where former team-mat Gordon West reveals that defeat makes him cry.

Shoot’s editorial appeals to UEFA to allow English clubs back into Europe, after a season in exile as a result of the Heysel Disaster.

As well as Bryan Robson, Peter Reid jumps on the Paul Bracewell bandwagon, praising him in his column.

Linfield get a feature as they aim to win their 5th successive title in what is their centenary season, despite the absence of Martin McGaughey through injury.

Jimmy Greaves Letters Page has a letter suggesting that England’s 0-0 draw with Northern Ireland was fixed, but Greaves disputes this by praising Northern Ireland, who narrowly lost to England in Belfast and beat Romania home and away.

In news, Aston Villa are in danger of losing their shirt sponsorship deal with Mita Copiers as a result of the TV blackout due to a dispute with broadcasters, while the FAI and Sligo Rovers denied a claim by Leicester City player Steve Lynex that he was run out of town by a gunman when on trial at Sligo.

Mark Hughes offered tickets to a 12 year old Sheffield Wednesday fan to their visit to Old Trafford later in the season, after he was hit by a ball that Hughes hit into a crowd when the sides met at Hillsbrough.

Les Sealey had his car stolen, but what he wants back the most is his shin pads, which he has worn throughout his career and views them as lucky.

Aberdeen get a team profile, where talk of a Clean Sweep of Scottish trophies has been banned, according to Willie Miller.

Staying in Scotland, they believe they’ve unearthed a new Danny McGrain, but it’s a Rangers player, Hugh Burns.

In foreign news, Brazil’s older players such as Socrates, Zico and Falcao are worried that Mario Zagallo will axe them for the World Cup if he is appointed manager. Derry City’s crowds of 7,000 are the biggest in the League Of Ireland, while San Marino are applying for membership to FIFA and UEFA, and hope to enter the qualifiers for the 1990 World Cup.

David Williams of Norwich City gets a feature, having taken the unusual step of quitting as Bristol Rovers manager (He was a 30 year old player/manager) to become a player at Norwich City.

Mark Falco gets a feature, after having to fight off competition to gain a place in Tottenham Hotspur’s starting team.

Franz Carr of Nottingham Forest has made such an impression, that Bobby Robson has marked him as one of England’s stars of the 1990 World Cup. No pressure on him, as Shoot bills him “The new George Best”

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to cheerlead for Steve Williams, his Arsenal team-mate to be in the England squad.

Shoot does a feature on Charlton Athletic, aiming for promotion to the top flight, despite having to play their home matches at Selhurst Park.

In adverts, Bucks Fizz are advertising calculators.

Frank McAvennie is the subject of this week’s “Focus On ….” where he reveals his favourite bands are U2 and Queen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.8.1984

The 1984-1985 season is about to start, and it’s Mark Hughes, billed as “one of the young hopefuls trying to break into the team at Old Trafford next season” who is the cover star of Shoot.

Shoot gives United a double page spread, saying they have the potential to be England’s biggest box office attraction, due to the number of attacking players in their squad.

Vince Hilare gets a full page profile, after being blasted for leaving Crystal Palace for Luton Town, citing the lure of top flight football and Luton’s attacking style of play as the reason for his move.

Another player on the move is Mick Mills, who has left Ipswich for Southampton. At the age of 36, he feels this is his last chance to win the title, having gone close with Ipswich in 1981 and 1982.

European draws have thrown up trips behind the Iron Curtain for Liverpool and Aberdeen in the European Cup, as well as a Northern Ireland v Republic Of Ireland clash between Linfield and Shamrock Rovers.

The UEFA Table is used to allocate UEFA Cup places based on results, with England top ahead of Italy and USSR.

Shoot does a double page feature on new Barcelona manager Terry Venables, where he describes the job as the biggest test of his career.

Venables old club QPR are getting used to life without him, but Terry Fenwick predicts a title challenge under new manager Alan Mullery.

Charlie Nicholas reveals in his column that Kenny Sansom fancies himself as an impressionist, with Norman Wisdom, Frank Spencer and Prince Charles his favourites.

Shoot looks at he the lack of job security for managers in Scotland, with 20 of the 38 league clubs changing manager between the summers of 1983 and 1984.

Mike Hazard gets a full page feature, having overcome an addiction to chocolate and hamburgers to get a place in the England squad.

Kenny Dalglish writes about his excitement of the forthcoming season, as Liverpool face Everton in the Charity Shield at Wembley. The two sides had met earlier in the year in the League Cup Final, which Liverpool won the replay 1-0 at Maine Road, though Dalglish incorrectly says the game was at Old Trafford.

In news, West Ham are looking to replace Frank Lampard Snr with Colin Gibson from Aston Villa, Liverpool have been told that Celtic won’t sell Paul McStay to them, and Billy Bingham says he have to rethink his tactics for away games after Northern Ireland’s defeat to Finland in their opening World Cup Qualifier.

Steve Foster is this week’s “Focus On ….” subject, where he reveals he likes all music, except Boy George.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 30.7.1994

Lee Sharpe is the cover star, having just been signed as a columnist by Match.

This edition, came with a free wallchart ……. and Team Tabs.

Sharpe’s team-mate Mark Hughes is the subject of a competition, where one lucky reader could win a VHS of ‘Hughesie : The Mark Hughes Story’

Le Sharpe’s column gets a double page spread, which begins with him talking about his holidays, a week in Portugal with his girlfriend, then a week in Crete with 16 (SIXTEEN) of his mates.

He also speaks about Pre-Season, and who would be United’s biggest challengers in 94/95. He said that Blackburn would be United’s biggest challengers that season, and so it proved, with Blackburn winning the league.

He also addresses transfer speculation, stating that he has signed a five year deal with United, so “I’m not leaving any time soon”

He was sold to Leeds in 1996.

In news, Ian Wright has signed a new contract at Arsenal, worth a whopping 7,000 pounds a week, Coventry wanted to sign Alexi Lalas, and Leeds want to sign Thomas Skuhravy.

Bryan Robson, newly appointed Player-Manager at Middlesbrough is a poster, as is Dean Saunders, in full page form.

Meanwhile, John Fashanu is interviewed saying he wants to help, as a middleman, African players get moves to English clubs. Awooga.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.5.1997

Juninho and Gianfranco Zola are the covers of this edition of Shoot, previewing the 1997 FA Cup Final between Chelsea and Middlesbrough, with the headline ‘Battle Of The Mighty Midgets’

Italians Gianfranco Zola and Fabrizio Ravenelli get double page spreads previewing the game, as do Juninho and Mark Hughes, as well as player profiles of the two line-ups.

Shoot’s pull-out results magazine rounds up the 1996-1997 league season. It was a season when the top five titles were all won by clubs from the North West of England. Manchester United won their 4th title in 5 years, Bolton Wanderers marked their last season at Burnden Park with an instant return to the Premier League, Bury pipped League Cup Semi-finalists Stockport County to win Division Two, Wigan won Division Three on Goal difference from Fulham, while Macclesfield Town won promotion to the Football League, where they remained before relegation in 2012.

For Fulham, it took four years, and Wigan, it took eight years for them to get promoted to the Premier League, where they have been ever since. Swansea City, now in the Premier League, lost the Play-Off Final to Northampton Town. Hull City finished 17th in Division Three, before getting promoted to the Premier League in 2008.

There was an advert for a magazine called Babe Hound, with a tagline of ‘More Big Girls Than Juventus v Dortmund’ (Those two sides were to contest that season’s European Cup Final)

The cover star for the current edition was Jo Guest, which featured posters of Dannii Minogue, Gina G, Victoria Adams (you may know her now under her married name of Beckham), Jennifer Aniston and Gillian Anderson.

You couldn’t have a more 1997 lad mag if you tried.