MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL EUROPE – APRIL 1999

Michael Owen of Liverpool is the cover star of Football Europe as the 1998-1999 season enters it’s final weeks.

There are potentially big changes in Europe coming up, with club football now taking place from February to November across Europe, while the Spanish FA has suggested that cup winners get a place in the expanded Champions League.

In France, Bernard Lama has called for unity in PSGs squad, as the club are battling against relegation.

Benfica get a double page profile as they continue to struggle under new manager Graeme Souness.

Also getting a double page profile is Marcelo Salas, who is riding on the crest of a wave after a successful World Cup and a big money move to Lazio.

There is a feature on both Madrid clubs, title Mayhem in Madrid, as both Real and Atletico have been trigger happy firing managers.

The clubs making up what is known as G14 are profiled, as well as predictions for their future.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – AUGUST 2003

Ronaldinho is the cover star of World Soccer with the headline “THE TWO RONNIES”, not a reference to him doing a sketch show with Ronaldo, but the differing on and off-field life he leads.

The recent transfer of David Beckham from Manchester United to Real Madrid gets four pages of coverage, and what it will mean for player and club.

Summer transfers are the main topic in this magazine, with Italian clubs shopping in the bargain basements.

Manchester United are armed with cash after the sale of Beckham and are linked with either Damien Duff or Harry Kewell, as well as Eric Djemba-Djemba and Tim Howard.

In Germany, Bayern Munich are eyeing up moves for Roy Makaay and Martin Demichellis.

There is a Q and A with Deco of UEFA Cup winners Porto, who considers Portugal his home now having played there for six years, and got a call-up to the national team despite being born in Brazil.

At Napoli, there is an interesting name at their youth team, Diego Maradona Jnr, the estranged son of the Napoli legend.

There is a double page feature on cover star Ronaldinho, then of Paris Saint Germain, but set to be a Manchester United player in a matter of time according to World Soccer.

The monthly Soccer Cities feature does a region instead, The Ruhr in Germany, home of Schalke and Borussia Dortmund.

There is a six page review of the recent Confederations Cup, a tournament marred by the tragic death of Marc Vivien Foe, a tournament which was described by Keir Radnedge as cheap and demeaning before Foe’s death.

There is a full page report on Real Madrid winning La Liga thanks to a win over Athletic Bilbao, a result which ironically helped Barcelona to sneak into the UEFA Cup.

In England, Michael Owen became the youngest player to win 50 caps, while Northern Ireland got a creditable draw against Spain, but it meant they continued a scoreless run of 972 minutes.

Porto added a domestic double to their UEFA Cup, but he local council chairman wouldn’t meet the team as he supports Boavista. There was more good news for Porto as manger Jose Mourinho committed his future to the club until 2006.

Staying with Porto, there is a profile of Helder Postiga, who has just left Porto for Tottenham Hotspur.

In South America, there is a profile of Boca Juniors striker Carlos Tevez, who has attracted the attention of Barcelona and Bayern Munich, but a clue to his future destination could come in the shape of him describing his post treasured possession as a Manchester United shirt given to him by David Beckham after a friendly between United and Boca the previous summer.

In Africa, Nigeria reach the finals of the African Nations Cup, while there is a profile of Aruna Dindane.

The magazine ends with Brian Glanville’s column, which states that David Beckham deserved better from Manchester United than the manner of his departure to Real Madrid.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 2.3.2002

The World Cup is not far off, and the race is on to be leading the line for England in the Far East. Michael Owen is guaranteed to go, but the race is on to partner him.

Match does a feature on current Premier League managers who have been cover stars in Match during their playing days.

Match assesses England’s striking options and their chances of going to the World Cup, and it’s good news for Michael Owen, Robbie Fowler, Teddy Sheringham and Emile Heskey.

Match has a weekly series called The Men For Sven, profiling England’s squad players. This week’s subject is Gareth Southgate.

Staying with World Cup previews, there is a profile of Group C teams Costa Rica and China.

One of the strikers profiled earlier, Emile Heskey, gets a three page profile.

Hot players profiled by Match include Patrick Suffo, Marco Di Vaio and Maurice Ross.

In Spain, Barcelona striker Patrick Kluivert reveals that he wants to one day play in England.

In letters, Ross Bissell from Dundee predicts that Scotland will do well at Euro 2004 under newly appointed manager Berti Vogts.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 13.10.2001

Having scored the goal that took England to the World Cup Finals, David Beckham is the cover star of Match, which reviews England’s successful qualifying campaign.

The man who made Beckham captain, Peter Taylor, is the main story on the contents page, having just been sacked by Leicester City, a year after being Caretaker Manager of England.

There is a full page interview with the Co-Creator of Championship Manager, Paul Collyer, following the release of Championship Manager 01/02.

There are four pages dedicated to England’s World Cup qualifying campaign, a match by match guide, as well as looking at the dramatic departure of Kevin Keegan as manager, and the appointment of Sven Goran-Eriksson.

There is a “Where Are They Now?” of Leeds United’s 1992 title winning team. The Leeds team of 2001-2002 were hoping to emulate them, sitting top of the Premier League. This magazine had a four page interview with goalkeeper Nigel Martyn.

Players described as “Hot” get a feature, such as Andy Oakes of Derby, Peter Crouch of Portsmouth and Darius Henderson of Reading.

George Burley, manager of Ipswich Town gets an interview, where he says the vacant Scotland job doesn’t appeal to him.

In ads, you could buy Michael Owen’s own brand breakfast cereal.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 18.7.1998

Zinedine Zidane, holding the World Cup aloft, is the cover star of Match, as they review the 1998 World Cup. Printing deadlines must have been tight, as the final took place on July 12th 1998.

Match looks at Ariel Ortega, who had went into the World Cup hyped as “The new Maradona”, emulated him by being sent-off in his first World Cup as Argentina crashed out. Unlike Maradona, he didn’t rectify it four years later.

Readers were treated to a compilation of Kevin Keegan’s finest commentary moments.

Lee Hendrie gets asked who his favourite Spice Girl is. After much hesitation, he plucked for Sporty Spice.

Phil Neville does the taste test, where he gets asked his favourites between two. Unsurprisingly, he picks Spice Girls (David and Victoria would have been very unhappy) over All Saints, and he prefers McDonalds over Burger King.

France’s win over Brazil gets four pages, with most of the focus being on Zinedine Zidane, where he speaks about the key moments of the game, and how he felt at each time.

Ryan Giggs gets asked for his Hits and Misses of France 98, labelling Michael Owen, Christian Vieri and Rivaldo as Hits, and Faustino Asprilla, Raul and Alessandro Del Piero as Misses.

Michael Owen gets a double page interview focusing on his meteoric rise over the past eighteen months, offering advice for aspiring young footballers.

Premier League stars such as Gary Croft, Rob Savage (yes, that’s what it said), Don Hutchinson, Mark Schwarzer and Christian Dailly were asked for their best and worst moments of the World Cup. Christian Dailly, listed his favourite game as England v Romania, when Romania won 2-1 in injury time.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 17.4.1999

As the 1998-1999 draws to a close, Match has three cover stars, a player each from Manchester United, Chelsea and Arsenal, as Match attempts to predict who will win the Premier League.

Nigel Martyn is the subject of a feature called “My first ….”

His first record bought was by The Police, and his first concert was Status Quo in Cornwall.

In news, Michael Owen’s fame has reached America, with a feature of him appearing in ESPN’s monthly sports magazine.

Edwin Van Der Sar states that he would be interested in joining Manchester United. It only took him the six years.

Patrick Vieira, Gianfranco Zola and Dwight Yorke are interviewed about the title run-in, though Match doesn’t make any predictions.

Ryan Giggs and Zinedine Zidane are interviewed as Match previews the second leg of the European Cup Semi-final between Manchester United and Juventus, with the first leg at Old Trafford finishing 1-1.

In competitions, Match readers had the opportunity to win the new England kit.

Robbie Fowler and John Filan also get double page interviews, as well as Lee Mills and Ashley Westwood of Bradford City, as they aim to get promoted to the top flight of English football for the first time since 1922.

There’s more double page spreads, as Match interviews David Seaman, Michael Owen and Alan Shearer at the launch of England’s new kit, and have a full page feature on England kits through the years.

MAGAZNE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 28.8.1999

Paul Scholes, not usually noted for doing interviews, is the cover star of Match, as the 1999-2000 season is in it’s early stages.

In news, Ron Atkinson, recently retired from football, is now working as a Brand Ambassaor for AOL.

Aaron Hughes gets featured as a promising youngster. Seth Johnson of Derby County gets asked for his three favourite TV shows, which are : Only Fools and Horses, Emmerdale, and Dream Team.

Match does an interview with Paul Scholes, where he talks about his love of scoring goals, his discipline, and how things will be harder for United after winning the treble.

There was only a page in the interview, so Match does a double page spread about Scholes most important and best goals.

Match does a feature where they write to Premier League players asking for signed photos and advice on how to be a footballer, using the psuedonym Paul Bezant.

18 players out of 42 replied, with Robbie Keane taking 169 days before sending in a signed Wolves programme.

Don Hutchison replied with a signed photo and advice “Keep working hard and stay dedicated to football and you will get noticed”

Michael Owen sent a reprinted signed photograph …….. and a Michael Owen Merchandise Catalogue.

Newly promoted to the Premier League, Watcford get three pages where Nick Wright, who scored an overhead kick in the play-off final at Wembley, gives a profile of his team-mates.

To link those two stories, I wrote to Watford in 1999 asking for Mark Williams and Peter Kennedy’s autographs ……. and they sent them out.

In competitions, you could win a chance to hang out with Ugo Ehiogu.

In a forerunner of MTV Cribs, Ian Harte shows us around his house in a double page spread. In it, he shows off his CD collection, but admits that he takes music advice from his Fiance.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 27.4.2002

Ruud Van Nistelrooy is the cover star of Match as the European Cup is the the Last 4, as Manchester United, Real Madrid, Bayern Leverkusen and Barcelona are aiming to lift the trophy at Hampden Park.

But that’s not the biggest story in football. David Beckham has broken his metatarsal and is in danger of missing the World Cup, so Match gives readers to opportunity to wish him well. Meanwhile, a poll of 7-14 year olds say David Beckham has the hardest job in the world …… so Match photoshops him doing other so called “Hard jobs”

In other news, Michael Owen had just become England’s second youngest captain, after Bobby Moore 40 years earlier.

In competitions, you could “Rio” on VHD or DVD, featuring exclusive interviews with Rio Ferdinand, and him giving a tour of Leeds.

If you did win it, and supported Leeds, you might have been handing it in to your local charity shop a few months later, as he signed for Manchester United in July that year.

Peter Schmeichel, recently signed for Manchester City, gets lampooned in Match’s cartoon “Footy Crazy” for his red nose, as City manager Kevin Keegan makes him stick his head in a freezer so it will turn blue.

Match pulled off a bit of a coup, getting a four page exclusive interview with Sir Alex Ferguson, who had recently made a u-turn on his retirement.

Ferguson tells Match that his family convinced him not to retire, and that his goals for the next three seasons (the length of the new contract he had signed) was to win a major tournament, speaking enthusiastically about the fact that the average age of United’s squad was 26.

He then speaks about his management style, and what he looks for in a player, declaring that his two top managers are Ottmar Hitzfeld and Marcello Lippi.

He describes Zinedine Zidane as the best player in the world, but wouldn’t have been prepared to pay the 50m Real Madrid paid for him in 2001 on account of his age.

When asked if he could sign a player from history for the current United team, he eulogises about Pele and Johan Cruyff (he actually signed his son Jordi in 1996) but chooses Real Madrid legend Alfredo Di Stefano.

He’s confident that United can win a 4th successive title, but admits United need Arsenal to drop points, and then United to beat Arsenal to have any chance. Arsenal won every game from February onwards to win the title.

He also praises Sir Bobby Robson for the job he had done with Newcastle (they finished 4th to reach the European Cup) and predicts Chelsea to win the FA Cup (they lost 2-0 to Arsenal) and was upbeat about United’s chance of winning the European Cup in his native Glasgow. They lost on away goals to Bayer Leverkusen.

Match signs off by asking what he wants to achieve in the future, Ferguson simply replies that he wants to maintain the success of the previous 12 years.

Both European Cup Semi-Finals get a double page spread previewing them, and there’s an interview with Butt. Not United’s Nicky, but Bayer Leverkusen goalkeeper Hans Jorg Butt.

As the World Cup draws closer, Match features England hopefuls each week in a feature called “The Men For Sven”, with Ashley Cole the featured player this week.

Staying on the World Cup theme, Republic of Ireland get a full page preview.

In Ads, you could pop down to Woolworths and buy “David Beckham : Close Up” or “Michael Owen : Close Up” on VHS if you wished.

Eidur Gudjohnsen gets a double page interview about his progress at Chelsea, while also touching other matters such as the World Cup, where he describes France as “Very strong”

They went out in the groups without scoring a goal.

The big match of the weekend is Ipswich Town v Manchester United, vital at both ends of the table.

Match predicts a 2-1 United win. United won 1-0.

In foreign news, Roberto Baggio’s dreams of going to a 4th World Cup have been dashed, while Christian Panucci is at the centre of a transfer battle between Barcelona and Real Madrid. He signed for Roma that summer, the club where he spent the 2001-2002 season on loan.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 24.6.2000

Alan Shearer, in his trademark “Arm up” goal celebration pose, is the cover star of Match, midway through Euro 2000, as England have just beaten Germany 1-0 in a crunch group game, with the headline “Where were you on June 17th 2000?”

In my case, watching the game in work.

Michael Owen is interviewed for a featured called “My Favourite Goal”, which unsurprisingly, is his goal against Argentina in the World Cup two years earlier.

Pep Guardiola is interviewed in a feature called F.R.I.E.N.D.S, where footballers talk about their best friends, Guillermo Amor being his.

Marcus Stewart is interviewed for a “Taste Taste” feature, asking footballers to chooses between two things. He prefers A-Ha over Aqua, Pounds over Euros, and BMW over Rover.

Match dedicates three pages to England’s Euro 2000 diary, documenting the change in emotions from the opening defeat to Portugal, to the win over Germany in the second game.

Meanwhile, Match spends 48 hours with Holland, ahead of their opening game with Czech Republic, which they won 1-0 with a late penalty.

Posters on offer include stars of Euro 2000 such as Pavel Nedved, Paul Scholes, Edwin Van Der Sar and, um, Niclas Alexandersson.

It’s not just players who get multiple page features, as Match interviews supporters at the tournament, about who they support, how they got to Euro 2000, and if they have enjoyed it.

Mark Bright is now Match’s letters guy, the main topic being Euro 2000. He doesn’t hold out much hope for Belgium (they went out in the groups) and describes England as “Now having a superb team”

A new phenomenon, the internet, gets a review feature, as Match reviews England fanzines such as “And Waddle Steps Up”, “England Supporters Online” and “England FC”

Meanwhile, Scott Minto of West Ham takes on Damien Francis of Wimbledon in a Euro 2000 Quiz. Both players scored 8 out of 10. Both players incorrectly said the Euro 2000 final would be in Amsterdam, while Minto though Tommy Soderberg was the coach of Norway (the correct answer was Sweden) and Francis thought Alessandro Del Piero scored Italy’s opener against Turkey. The correct answer was Pippo Inzaghi.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – AUGUST 1997

The latest segment in the “Magazine Archive” series takes us back to a time when Ibrahim Ba was the future of French football and Glenavon fans were unhappy, because their team “only” won the Irish Cup. It was a strange world in August 1997.

That month’s edition of World Soccer had Ibrahim Ba as it’s cover star. Back then, Ba was the biggest rising star in French football tipped for a move to a major European side and to be one of the leadcing lights of the following year’s World Cup, which was to be held in France.

Also on the cover was Marc Overmars, who had recently signed for Arsenal, to highlight a feature on football’s biggest transfers that summer. Other headlines on the front cover include reviews of the World Youth Cup and Copa America.

Editor Keir Radnedge takes a look at the new-look Champions League, which now featured 2nd placed teams from selected countries, pointing out that of the clubs benefitting, only Barcelona and Parma had a realistic chance of winning the trophy. Both teams were eliminated in the group stage.

The following season, however, both finalists qualified for the competition by being 2nd in their league the previous season.

A round-up of the qualification for France 98 so far is featured in the magazine, taking a look at the hosts France and their preparation, which included Le Tournoi, a 4 team group competition featuring England, Brazil and Italy, which was won by England.

When looking at old reviews of youth events, it’s always fun looking at the line-ups to see who made it as a professional footballer in adult life. The team line-ups for the 1997 World Youth Cup includes Walter Samuel, Esteban Cambiasso, Jamie Carragher, Michael Owen, Thierry Henry, and Trevor Molloy.

There is a picture of Cambiasso celebrating a goal wearing Argentina’s away kit, in a similar pose to when he scored his iconic goal against Serbia in the 2006 World Cup.

In the round-up from various countries, cover star Ibrahim Ba gets a full page dedicated to him.

Not long afterwards, he signed for AC Milan before suffering a dip in form which saw left left out of France’s squad for the 1998 World Cup.

Ba is probably best known to UK fans for a brief spell with Bolton Wanderers during the 2003-2004 season.

The four countries of the UK get a double page spread with the England piece looking at England’s Le Tournoi success and a look at the new signings in English football, with the accompanying picture being of Teddy Sheringham, signed to replace Eric Cantona at Manchester United.

In manager news, Southampton were unable (and some could say had a lucky escape) to persuade David Platt to be their player-manager, while Everton were rejected by Bobby Robson, and Andy Gray, who couldn’t be persuaded to leave Sky.

The offer of managing Everton couldn’t get him to leave Sky, but off-mic comments about a female official did, although not on his accord.

In Northern Ireland, the lack of signings at Linfield, Glentoran, Glenavon and Portadown grabbed the headlines, as these clubs had endured disappointing 1996-1997 seasons by their standards.

Ironically, it was a signing during the season which grabbed the headlines, as Glenn Ferguson moved from Glenavon to Linfield for an (still standing to this day) Irish League record of £55,000

Choice quote from the article “Even though top scorer Garry Haylock is at Portadown, one wonders if his club’s supporters rate him worth the £1,000 a week he is reputedly paid” – Though Haylock no doubt rates himself worth it ………. and then some more.

“Brian Glanville’s Last Word” focuses on the TV commentary debut of Jonathan Pearce, who had covered the World Cup Qualifier between Poland and England for newly formed terrestrial channel, Channel Five, and had suffered negative criticism for his performance, though Glanville’s article was very supportive of him.

Pearce eventually got a big move to the BBC, although, it was to commentate on Robot Wars, before eventually joining Match Of The Day.

Glanville also remarked that Paul Gascoigne wasn’t good enough to play international football anymore, and that Paul Scholes should now be the centrepiece of the England team.

This proved to be prophetic, as just under a year later, Gascoigne was left out of England’s World Cup squad, while Scholes was included, scoring the decisive 2nd goal in the 2-0 opening match win against Tunisia.