MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.3.1977

Peter Shilton and Frank Stapleton, going for an aerial challenge, are Shoot’s cover stars in early March 1977.

A series of footballers are asked to describe the moments that changed their career, with pep talks from other goalkeepers being beneficial to the careers of Jimmy Rimmer and Joe Corrigan.

Glenn Hoddle, a rising star at Spurs, credits Martin Chivers for helping Spurs sign him, after he presented medals at a schools cup final that Hoddle played in.

Meanwhile, Scotland announced away friendlies in 1977 against Chile and East Germany.

In other news, the price of this year’s FA Cup Final programme has increased from 20p to 50p. The reason given that it will be a special bumper edition as it was the year of The Queen’s Silver Jubilee.

Beside that, getting only a few column inches, Alex Ferguson has changed his status manager of St Mirren to full-time.

Billy Murray scored five goals in a game for Portadown against Dundela, while Jim Harvey of Glenavon is attracting scouts from clubs in England.

Kevin Keegan uses his column to warn that early international call-ups can prove damaging to young players in the long-term.

Aston Villa defender John Gidman gets a full page profile, where he is described as “Liverpool’s present to Aston Villa”, having been turned down by the Anfield club as a youngster.

England’s recent friendly against Holland gets a double page photo piece, with a further two pages being given to post match analysis from various football figures.

Gordon Hill uses his column to state that he wants Manchester City to win the league.

Football in Argentina gets a full page profile, with just over a year until they host the World Cup.

In world news, there was a minute silence before a game for an official in Peru, only for it to emerge that reports of his death were erronious.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.10.1985

Glenn Hoddle of England is the cover star of this edition of Shoot. Or perhaps, not of England, if the headline is anything to go by.

This was also the week in Back To The Future II where Marty McFly visits 2015.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Steve McMahon, who has just joined Liverpool from Aston Villa, nearly three years after rejecting Liverpool to go to Villa Park.

Meanwhile, there are reports that England’s top clubs could be forming a breakaway Super League.

Cover star Glenn Hoddle is interviewed, finally becoming an England regular, and is confident of returning home from Mexico the following summer with the World Cup.

The cover headline “I’LL QUIT ENGLAND” refers to his club status, as he expresses his desire to play on the continent, which he did in 1987 when he signed for Monaco.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that Peter Barnes is worthy of a place in the England squad to provide competition for John Barnes and Chris Waddle.

Northern Ireland’s vital World Cup Qualifier away to Romania gets previewed, with manager Billy Bingham confidently predicting that Northern Ireland will finish 2nd in their group and head to Mexico.

Republic Of Ireland also have ambitions of going to Mexico, and have blooded Tony Cascarino into their squad in time for their vital game away to the Soviet Union.

Portsmouth manager Alan Ball gets a photo collage, as he aims to lead the club back to the top flight of English football.

Peter Shilton gets a double page feature as he becomes England’s most capped goalkeeper, complete with a tribute from Gordon Banks, who he replaced at Leicester City, Stoke City and England, with the headline “PETER SHILTON – KING OF KEEPERS”

West Germany manager Franz Beckenabauer feels this season’s European club competitions have been devalued by the absence of English clubs, while Canada have qualified for the World Cup for the first time in their history.

Meanwhile, Napoli failed in their bid to sign Hugo Maradona from Argentinos Juniors, the younger brother of Diego Maradona.

A dispute between the governing body and broadcasters meant that there were no games on TV, so Shoot did a double page photo collage of the best strikes.

In Scotland, there is a full page profile and a poster of Celtic.

In Wales, Mark Hughes was set to miss the opening games of Euro 88 Qualifying, due to a red card in an underage Euro qualifier against Yugoslavia in 1983.

Steve Cowan gets a full page feature, having just signed for Hibs and is hoping to put his injury problems behind him.

Bradford City get featured, as the club tries to recover from the tragic fire at their ground five months earlier.

Peter Reid uses his column to talk about Everton’s problems conceding goals, especially in the early moments of games.

Reid’s Everton team-mate Gary Lineker is happy, having found a Snooker Club near his home in Southport, and has managed to convince Willie Thorne to start supporting Everton.

Meanwhile, Portsmouth are trying to sign Paul Mariner from Arsenal.

The magazine ends with a profile of Davie McPherson of Rangers. His favourite music is Dire Straits and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 6.2.1971

Action from a match between Stoke City and Manchester City is the cover image as the the 1970-1971 season approaches it’s final stages, with Shoot asking if Leeds or Arsenal will be Champions.

Shoot does a double page spread where they interview players such as Nobby Stiles, Glyn Pardoe, John Sissons, Bobby Gould and Mark Lazarus about what it is like to score at Wembley.

Even though he is a defender, Bobby Moore uses his column to declare that matches are won in midfield, and commenting on who his favourite midfieldes are.

Joe McBride of Dunfermline Athletic answers questions submitted by Shoot readers, with Shoot giving a list of upcoming interviewees, including Peter Shilton, Johnny Giles and Steve Perryman.

Peter Shilton gets given a full page by Shoot to explain how he manages to kick the ball so far up the field.

There is a poster of Sunderland defender Colin Todd.

Scotland are in action against Belgium in a European Championship Qualifier, with Shoot noting that history was on Scotland’s side, as they had a better record in head to head meetings between the two sides.

Belgium won the match 3-0. Scotland and Belgium would see a lot of each other over the next 16 years, being paired together in Qualification for 1980, 1984 and 1988, as well as 1972.

England were also in European Championship action, away to Malta, with Shoot’s preview pointing out that Malta have the ability to hold out against England. England won the match 1-0.

Shoot previews the title run-in between Leeds and Arsenal, listing their remaining fixtures but sitting on the fence with regards to who will win it.

Arsenal won the league that season, finishing 1 point clear of 2nd place Leeds, and then added the FA Cup, becoming the 2nd side in the 20th Century to win the League and FA Cup double.

John Hollins is interviewed, stating that he studies Bobby Charltopn and Billy Bremner in an attempt to be a better player, stating that he wants to be part of England’s squad for the 1974 World Cup.

Dick Staite of Clyde is interviewed, and he states that the person he would like to meet most is Alexander Dubcek, former Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia.

Alan Ball uses his column to state that stay away fans are affecting team morales, as players find it difficult to play in front of empty stands.

Peter Simpson previews Arsenal’s trip to Anfield, claiming that his side feel unbeatable.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 28.12.1985

Nothing says Christmas quite like Charlie Nicholas holding a crown, and that’s what Shoot readers were treated to as they tucked into their turkey in 1985.

As you open the magazine, Ian Rush writes that he hopes 1986 will be a better year for him than 1985, and saying that Wales players failed Mike England in 1985, while also criticising the FAW for playing their vital World Cup qualifier against Scotland at Cardiff rather than Wrexham.

Shoot columnist Jimmy Greaves gets a double page interview, but it’s not football he’s discussing, it’s his predictions for other sports in 1986.

Cover star Charlie Nicholas writes that he is lacking in Christmas Spirit for the fixture computer as Arsenal face Liverpool and Manchester United over the festive period, with Nicholas pointing out that he has been on the losing side in his five games against United for Arsenal.

Nicholas is also pictured visiting Selfridges.

Another top flight player is pictured dressed as Santa. The clues are that he is 25, plays for a club in the North of England and has less than ten international caps. It is revealed later in the magazine that it is Gary Lineker.

In world news, Brazilian star Eder is linked with a move to Spurs, Gerard Houllier is praised for PSGs unbeaten start in France, and Holland have been offered lucrative friendlies in the summer of 1986 which will earn them more money than if they had reached Mexico.

In Uruguay, legendary manager Luis Cubilla has been jailed for attacking a referee who gave a penalty against his team.

Brian Clough is the subject of a “Focus On ….” feature, where he reveals his favourite musician is Frank Sinatra.

Shoot does a double page feature on transfers that almost happened, such as Jim Bett to Southampton, Bryan Robson to Everton and Charlie Nicholas to Manchester United.

Nicholas decided against signing for Untied after meeting Ron Atkinson, who he says talks about himself too much.

There is a double page spread featuring all the results in the qualifiers for the 1986 World Cup.

Shoot does a full page profile of Oxford United manager Maurice Evans, who has been given Robert Maxwell’s seal of approval after being predicted to be the first manager sacked at the start of the season.

Led by European Cup winner Peter Withe, Sheffield United get a feature and a team poster as they aim for promotion to the top flight.

Glenn Hoddle has been making the most of his spare time by spending it in the recording studio, where Shoot joined him, stating that he is determined to become good at Guitar. He would have a Top 20 hit in 1987 as part of Glenn and Chris, alongside Chris Waddle.

Peter Shilton gets a full page profile, with quotes of what other football personalities say about him. Bobby Robson describes him as the greatest goalkeeper of all time.

Alex Ferguson of Scotland and Aberdeen gets a double page profile looking at what makes him tick. He had recently turned down a move to Inter Milan.

John Bailey gets a profile, having left Everton for Newcastle. Bailey was seen as a joker at Goodison where he arranged for a Kissogram for manager Howard Kendall.

Bryan Robson’s column discusses United’s signing of John Sivebeak, having got glowing reports from Frank Stapleton and Kevin Moran, who faced him in a recent international.

Also writing about a new signing is Paul McStay, who is delighted that Mark McGee has signed for Celtic.

Manchester United’s explosive start to the season brought back memories of Leeds going 29 games unbeaten at the start of 1973-1974, and Leeds stars of that era share their memories.

Alan McDonald is interviewed, where he reveals that he turned down Manchester United, Liverpool and Everton to join QPR, hits back at England fans who suggested that their draw with Northern Ireland was a fix, and reveals that he feels he is far from guaranteed a place in Northern Ireland’s World Cup squad.

West Ham’s forward duo of Tony Cottee and Frank McAvennie are profiled, where it is revealed that their partnership only came together due to injury.

Scotland fans got a double page photo collage from their side’s World Cup Play-Off win against Australia, with Graeme Souness being interviewed over the page, stating that it was Scotland’s best chance to get past the group stages for the first time.

Ian Greaves gets interviewed, having recently turned down the chance to manage West Brom in order to stay at Mansfield.

Chelsea and Manchester United are keeping an eye on Brian McClair, who has just handed in a transfer request at Celtic after being dropped to make way for Mark McGhee, while Colin Gibson hopes his recent move to Manchester United will get him a place in England’s World Cup squad.

Seamus McDonagh was £900 out of pocket when he played for Republic of Ireland in a recent match against Denmark, after flying in from America (where he plays his club football) at his own expense, and his match fee not covering it.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve McMahon. His favourite singers are Rod Stewart and Bruce Springsteen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.7.1986

Diego Maradona, held aloft, carrying the World Cup trophy is the cover star of Shoot, as they look back at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

The editor’s page though, looks at the organisation of the tournament, criticising the standard of sound/pictures on the TV coverage, state of the pitches and standard of refereeing.

Elsewhere on the page, he bemoaned the number of British players now playing abroad, asking if stars like Frank McAvennie or Kenny Sansom will be next.

In a recurring theme from 1986 onwards, Bryan Robson has just come out of surgery, and his ready to return for Manchester United, while also appearing in an advert for New Balance boots.

England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s exploits in Mexico didn’t go unnoticed, as the three teams had a centre page poster, featuring a collage of match action from their games, with the headline ‘THEY DID US PROUD’

There is a free pull-out of a review of the competition, complete with match statistics and line-ups from every game.

Line 7 is another boot manufacturer having an advert in this issue, with France midfielder Jean-Marc Ferreri as their Brand Ambassador.

The tagline in the ad says “Jean-Marc Ferreri scored the equalising goal that helped France secure third place in the World Cup”

I’m no marketing expert, but I think that might need a bit of work.

There were three pages dedicated to an unseen victory for England at the 1986 World Cup, learning from their errors at the 1970 World Cup where they weren’t so open to the Mexican public.

FA Press Officer Glen Kirton used his A-Level Spanish to Liaise with locals, making sure that England’s time in Mexico ran smoothly.

It was pointed out that they had checked out training venues and hotels in Mexico in 1983, as well as a South American tour (1984) and Mexico friendlies (1985) the following summers, as well as players meeting and greeting locals while in Mexico.

During the tournament, players had a lot of free time. Gary Bailey spent most of his time reading a book or listening to his Ghetto Blaster.

England players made the most of movies lent to them by CBS.

Gary Lineker was the king of the pool table, though Glenn Hoddle gave him a run for his money. Hoddle was described as “Like John McEnroe, minus the fiery temper”

David McCreery gets a full page dedicated to him, as he is interviewed about his experiences of the tournament, having been described as Northern Ireland’s player of the tournament by manager Billy Bingham.

A third boot advert, this time Hi-Tec, endorsed by Peter Reid, Steve McMahon and Emlyn Hughes. The boot of Scousers.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, one reader asks if Greavsie thinks Bobby Robson is the right man to lead England. Greavsie speaks up in support of Robson, and was proved right as England reached the Semi-finals in 1990.

Niki Corrigan from Hartlepool writes in to say that Diego Maradona will be remembered as a cheat.

Denmark star Michael Laudrup is the subject of a player profile. He supports Liverpool and Leeds, and his favourite bands are : Wham, ELO, Stevie Wonder and Duran Duran.

His long-term ambition was to play for Denmark in the 1990 World Cup Finals in Italy. Unfortunately, Denmark didn’t qualify.

Having had three boot adverts, there was room for one more advert, but it was Uhlsport, for gloves, featuring some of the world’s best goalkeepers such as Pat Jennings, Walter Zenga, Peter Shilton, Joel Bats, and um …… Jim Platt of Coleraine.