MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 31.7.1982

The cover image is of Dino Zoff lifting aloft the World Cup trophy, as Shoot reviews the 1982 World Cup, won by Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a single page report of the final, with a statistical analysis of the tournament beside it.

There is then a double page profile of the three UK teams at the tournament – England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Shoot then does a more indepth report on the tournament, saying that overall it wasn’t good, but the performances of teams such as Algeria, Cameroon and Honduras meant that expanding it to 24 teams was a success.

Bryan Robson writes in his column that Brazil were the team of the tournament, England would have won it if they had Zico, and that the biggest disappointment was Diego Maradona.

Ron Greenwood is interviewed, saying it had been a great five years as England manager, and that he won’t use his role as an Advisor with the FA to interfere with new manager Bobby Robson.

Phil Thompson uses his column to state he was proud of England’s performances, and that if England weren’t to win it, he would have loved Brazil to do so.

Danny McGrain uses his column to express his pride at Scotland winning the youth version of the European Championship, as well as the emergence of players such as Ally McCoist, David Moyes, Neale Cooper and Scott McGarvey.

Malcolm Allison believes that he should have been appointed England manager, and told Shoot that. Shoot also profiled his current club, Portugese champions Sporting Lisbon.

Ray Wilkins provides a full page World Cup diary for Shoot. He had a shopping trip to Madrid ruined by the weather.

Shoot does a story on Kenny Dalglish, whose international career looks over at the age of 31 after being dropped during the World Cup by Jock Stein.

It wasn’t all about the World Cup. In domestic football, Eddie Gray has been appointed manager of Leeds United, which he describes as a mammoth task.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.5.1983

There’s a Scottish theme to this edition of Shoot, with Kenny Dalglish and Charlie Nicholas sharing the cover with Aberdeen, facing Real Madrid in the European Cup Winners Cup Final.

As you open the magazine, there are features on Dalglish and Nicholas, voted Most Exciting Player and Most Exciting Young Player respectively.

In news, Manchester United, Ipswich Town and West Ham United are showing an interest in Leicester City’s Gary Lineker, while West Bromwich Albion have denied that Martin Jol and Romeo Zondervan will be leaving the club.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to express his delight at being recalled to the England squad, and paying tribute to Manchester United team-mate Martin Buchan ahead of his testimonial.

Another United player with England ambitions is Gary Bailey, who tells Shoot that he is ready for a call-up. Shoot lists rivals for a place in the squad, which includes Andy Goram of Oldham Athletic.

Across Manchester, Kevin Bond tells Shoot of his delight at winning over Manchester City supporters following a difficult start to his time at the club.

Following Jimmy Case’s winning goal from a free-kick for Brighton in the FA Cup Semi-Final, Shoot does a double page spread on the importance of goals from set pieces.

There is a feature on 15 year old Dean Vokes, who won a competition to be Assistant Manager to Malcolm MacDonald at Fulham for a day. Fulham beat Charlton 2-1.

As the 1982-1983 season comes to an end, Shoot does a feature on four hat-trick during the season, by Clive Allen, Ian Rush, Luther Blissett and Gary brooke

Aberdeen’s match against Real Madrid gets previewed with Alex Ferguson doing a profile of the Aberdeen squad for Shoot.

There is also a profile of the Real Madrid squad.

Bobby Russell of Rangers uses the Tartan Talk column to reveal that he planned on emigrating to New Zealand as a teenager, but red tape stopped it, something he says he is grateful for in retrospect.

Phil Thompson uses his column to speak of his pride at winning his 7th title medal, a record for a player in English football, predicting that there will be more to come.

In West Germany, football authorities have expressed concern at falling attendances in the top flight.

Shoot does a feature on Andy Ritchie and Terry Connor, who have moved opposite ways in a player swap between Leeds ans Brighton.

England are hosting the European Youth Championship, with England manager Graham Taylor, who would be appointed senior manager in 1990, praising the youth football of neighbours and holders Scotland.

Gary Shaw uses his column to congratulate Aston Villa team-mate Peter Withe on being selected for the England team for their recent match against Hungary.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Flanagan of QPR, who reveals his favourite singers are Joe Jackson and Elkie Brookes.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 1.3.1986

Celtic and Manchester United are on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot as they prepare to face each other in a mid-season friendly, with the headline “Soccer on trial”.

The headline refers to the fact that it was the first high profile away game by an English club since the previous season’s European Cup Final, which resulted in English clubs being banned from Europe.

As you open the magazine, Danny Wallace fires a message to John Barnes and Chris Waddle that he is after their World Cup place following an impressive England debut in a recent friendly away to Egypt.

The friendly at Parkhead that featured on the cover gets a double page spread, with the game billed as an unofficial British Cup Winners Cup Final, after both teams won their respective national cup competitions in 1985.

Paul McStay of Celtic suggests that a former Rangers player might have a keen interest in this game, as Scotland manager Alex Ferguson might take the opportunity to spy on Jesper Olsen of United, with Denmark being a group opponent of Scotland in the forthcoming World Cup.

In ads, you can buy The Official FA Cup Game for just £7.75 on Spectrum, Commodore or Armstrad.

Talking of adverts, England’s squad has agreed a sponsorship deal with the Health Education Council to front an anti-smoking campaign.

Bryan Robson uses his column to praise Peter Beardsley, who recently made his international debut during that recent friendly in Egypt.

Northern Ireland are also in international action, with an away friendly against France, with the game getting a double page feature, with John McClelland being interviewed.

Shoot looks at the options for Scotland’s squad, and they urge Alex Ferguson to find a place for Pat Nevin in the 22.

Staying in Scotland, Hibs youngster Gordon Hunter gets praised by his manager John Blackley.

Phil Thompson is interviewed, where he states that if he could lead Sheffield United into the top flight, it would be as big a thrill as all the trophies he won with Liverpool.

Across Sheffield, Wednesday striker Carl Shutt gets a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves awards his Wally Of The Week Award to Nick Gregory from Banbury, who states that Oxford United are the best team in England.

In Spain, Terry Venables is eyeing up a move to Tottenham Hotspur, but he could be replaced at Barcelona by another British manager, John Toshack of Real Sociedad.

Andy King is interviewed where he expresses his frustration at not getting much action at Luton Town.

Jack Charlton, newly appointed Republic Of Ireland manager, has a big decision to make, as he might have to drop 30 year olds Liam Brady, Frank Stapleton and Tony Grealish.

Charlton has faced some resentment for his appointment due to not being Irish, but also shock that he got the job ahead of Bob Paisley.

Much loved referee Clive Thomas comments on the number of penalties missed in recent years, pointing the finger at his fellow referees for allowing keepers to steal yards.

Craig Levein of Hearts gets a profile as he dreams of a World Cup place, just a few years after almost quitting football to work in an Electronics Factory.

The upcoming Merseyside Derby gets a double page feature, with contributions from Peter Reid and Steve McMahon.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Channon. His favourite music is Paul McCartney, Elton John and Rod Stewart.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.7.1979

Match action from England’s recent visit to Sweden is the cover of Shoot, as they try to fill in the gap during the pre-season of 1979.

In news, Brian Clough has drawn praise from pundits in the Soviet Union after Nottingham Forest’s European Cup win, and Northern Ireland have announced a tour of Australia for the summer of 1980.

Pierce O’Leary of Shamrock Rovers was linked with a move to Coventry City, potentially, the first League Of Ireland player to move to an English club for a six figure fee. Staying in Dublin, Pele was a surprise visitor to Dublin for the friendly between Republic of Ireland and Argentina.

Distillery were facing expulsion from the Irish League if they couldn’t have a new ground by the start of the 1980-1981 season.

And finally, Coventry City became the first Football League team to visit the Faroe Islands, beating a local team 6-0.

The volume of British players in the US meant the NASL got a page of coverage, the lead story being that George Best had went missing for a week.

Gordon McQueen, writing a column, expresses his concern that the games between England and Scotland could be banned due to crowd violence, expressing his anger at a Scottish fan who invaded the pitch with his side 1-0 up, causing a delay. England went on to win the game 3-1.

McQueen also spoke about an 18 year old called Diego Maradona, who faced Scotland and was described by McQueen as “Another Pele in the making”, but was disappointed at the lack of TV coverage of the game, due to a dispute with the BBC.

In letters, a Shrewsbury Town fan complains about the lack of acknowledgement given to boss Graham Turner for his success at the club. A reader from Perth wrote in to complain about the BBC being biased towards Rangers.

A young manager starting out in the game is 32 year old Howard Kendall, and his appointment at Blackburn Rovers gets 2/3 of a page coverage.

RC Strasbourg get a full page profile, with a team poster on the other side.

To fill up space with no football, we get a full page of footballers on holiday, including a picture of Phil Neal throwing Phil Thompson into a swimming pool.

Part 8 of Shoot’s review of the 1978-1979 season reveals that Barcelona want Bobby Robson to be their manager. It only took 17 years for them to get him.

Derek Johnstone’s Scottish football column is accompanied by a picture of him playing video games with his wife.

Wigan Athletic, having just completed their first season as a league club, feature in an article asking if they will “Do a Wimbledon” – Wimbledon (promoted to the Football League in 1977) got promoted in their second season.

Wigan did indeed “Do a Wimbledon” in terms that they reached the top flight (in 27 years compared to Wimbledon’s 9) and won the FA Cup (took them 35 years compared to Wimbledon’s 11)

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 2.6.1979

The summer of 1979 is almost upon us, but there are many things to be decided. Amazingly, the Home Championship game between England and Scotland, Scotland’s first visit to Wembley since the (in)famous 1977 game, taking more coverage on the cover ahead of Nottingham Forest’s European Cup Final against Malmo.

The game gets a double page spread, with Denis Law and Alan Ball talking about their memories of the fixture.

Phil Thompson gets a page to speak about his Anfield team mate and international opponent Alan Hansen, describing him as not having a weakness.

Northern Ireland and Wales aren’t left out with Gerry Armstrong and Malcolm Page both being posters, pictured in their international kits.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, heavy on international football with previews of vital European Championship Qualifiers for England (v Bulgaria), Scotland (v Norway), Northern Ireland (v Denmark) and Wales (v Malta), as well as an interview with Daniel Passarella.

There is also photos and reports of European Championship Qualifiers for Northern Ireland (v Bulgaria. Northern Ireland and England were in the same group), Scotland (v Norway) and Wales (v West Germany)

Euro 80 was the first European Championship with a pre-determined host, rather than selecting one of the four countries who won their Quarter-Finals.

Nottingham Forest and Malmo, contesting the European Cup Final, both get a double page spread, as well as a picture collage of how both teams reached the final.

Malmo had an English manager, Bob Houghton, described by Shoot as “The Brian Clough of Sweden”

In news, John Gregory is frustrated at being considered a utility, having worn every number from 2 to 11 in his 57 appearances for the club

Cliftonville get a mention with a short mention of Ciaran McCurry, who underline his potential with a “Near international display” in their Irish Cup Final win over Portadown.

Final league table for both Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland are published. Linfield were champions with 34 points from 22 games, 6 ahead of Glenavon in 2nd place.

It was 2 points for a win in them days. To translate it into 3 points for a win, Linfield would have finished 9 points clear of Glenavon with 48 points.

Steve Williams of Southampton is given a player profile. His favourite music is Three Degrees, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart. If he wasn’t a footballer, he would have been a Brain Surgeon.

Andy Gray writes for Shoot, saying that Scotland are favourites to win at Wembley. England won the match 3-1, and claimed the Home Championship.

Christine Nettugh, an 18 year old Aberdeen fan writes in to complain about the Glasgow centric coverage of Scottish football in Shoot.

She won 3 pounds as a prize for Letter Of The Week.

The editor replies that a club like Aberdeen winning the league would be refreshing for Scottish football. Little did they know that Aberdeen’s profile would be raising in UK and European terms over the next secen years.