MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10.2.1979

Terry Butcher and Frank Worthington are the cover stars of Shoot, in a week that sees England, Scotland and Northern Ireland playing European Championship Qualifiers, with England facing Northern Ireland at Wembley.

That match gets a double page feature as you open the magazine.

Brian Talbot might have just signed for Arsenal, but he says he still supports his former club Ipswich Town.

Ray Clemence uses his column to declare that West Bromwich Albion are Liverpool’s biggest rivals for the title.

Emlyn Hughes of Liverpool tells Shoot that he is at a crossroads in his career, as he looks to recover from injury.

Mick Mills of Ipswich Town has a revolutionary plan for the future of English football – A Winter break and reduction of the top two divisions to 16 clubs each.

Nottingham Forest are the subject of this week’s Club Spotlight, having won the title in 1978. They are described as “History makers”, and the day before the publication date, they signed Trevor Francis from Birmingham City, Britain’s first million pound transfer.

Watford have reached the Semi-Finals of the League Cup, and manager Graham Taylor says this was no shock to him.

In foreign news, Argentina star Rene Houseman tells Shoot of his dismay after a move to Middlesbrough fell through.

Cover star Frank Worthington is being nominated for a place in the England team by his Bolton team-mat Willie Morgan.

The magazine ends with Derek Johnstone’s column, as he gets ready for big European games at club and international level – A European Cup Quarter-Final for Rangers against Koln, and a European Championship Qualifier for Scotland against Belgium.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.7.1989

It’s the summer of 1989 and clubs are getting ready for the new season, as Paul Stewart is cover star of Shoot, telling him of his “White Hart Pain”

The pain in question was a disappointing 1988-1989 season following his move from Manchester City, which gets a double page feature as soon as you open the magazine.

Everton’s new signings Stefan Rehn and Martin Keown get a double page, with Rehn giving up his job as a Painter and Decorator to play in England, while Martin Keown hopes his move to Goodison Park will fulfill his dream of winning the league, which he thought had disappeared when he left Arsenal.

Also leaving Aston Villa was Alan McInally, with Graham Taylor facing criticism from angry fans over the sale. Taylor himself was angry with the conduct by Bayern Munich in the deal, who he says illegally approached his player.

Another player heading to the Continent was Chris Waddle, who has just left Tottenham Hotspur for Marseille, with Spurs manager Terry Venables telling Shoot that this is an opportunity for Gazza to come out of the shadows and become a big star.

Brits abroad were all the rage is this issue, with John Toshack getting a full page profile having just been appointed manager of spanish champions Real Madrid.

Rangers and Celtic are hoping that the Home Office will grant them permits for foreign signings, with Thomas Madigage of South Africa wanting to go to Rangers, and Dariusz Dziekanowski wanting to sign for Celtic.

Lou Macari is the new manager of West Ham, and has told his players they have to toughen up if they want to win promotion.

Tony Agana and Brian Deane are featured as part of a feature called Dynamic Duos, inspired by the cinematic success of the Batman movie, which didn’t actually feature Robin.

This week’s Player Profile was Alan McCleary of Milwall. Disappointingly, they asked him football related question and not who is favourite band is.

The magazine ends with Bryan Robson using his column to declare that Manchester United’s signing of Mike Phelan and Neil Webb will be the best signings of the summer.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – NOVEMBER 2002

Kanu and Thierry Henry are the cover stars of this edition of When Saturday Comes, modestly complimenting themselves on Arsenal’s brilliant start to the season.

This editions editorial focuses on footballer’s autobiographies, after Manchester United have banned their players from writing autobiographies after the fall-out from Roy Keane’s recent book.

The furore, gets further investigated in a full page article.

Across the page, there is an article about Darlington’s failed bid to sign Faustino Asprilla, ahead of their move to a 25,000 seater stadium in 2003.

Talking of new stadiums, there might be new ones coming in Republic of Ireland and Scotland, as both countries are making a joint bid to host Euro 2008, with the lack of current stadiums in both countries getting featured by WSC.

The 2003 Women’s World Cup Qualifiers get featured, with France standing between England and a place in the finals.

The French are now allowing their women’s team to use the Clairefontaine facility that the men’s team used to win the 1998 World Cup, and have set a goal of winning the women’s one by 2007.

The tournament was moved from China to USA due to the SARS outbreak, while France won the Qualifier but went out in the group stages. They didn’t win the 2007 competition.

There are features on recently relegated Midlands clubs Derby County (2002) and Coventry City (2001) as they try to get back to the Premier League.

Ahead of a documentary which is about the be premiered, there is a double page spread on the North Korea team that reached the 1966 World Cup Quarter-Finals.

Peter Taylor is helping out at Peterborough, just two years after being England manager, which is covered with the witty headline “From Becks To Posh”

There is a profile of Richard Witschge, highly rated by Johan Cruyff but couldn’t get a game for Blackburn.

Sepp Blatter has just been re-elected FIFA President, and one writer takes him up on his promise to give Oceana an automatic World Cup place.

The monthly look at the best of the web takes a look at the best Welsh football websites, with the national team making a good start to the Euro 2004 Qualifiers.

WSC heads to Norway to look at the problems in club football caused by Rosenborg’s dominance in the 1990s.

Talking of declines, WSC looks at the decline of Scotland and Austria as European forces, focusing on a Champions League game between Sturm Graz and Rangers in 2000.

The magazine ends with a look at the highlights and lowlights of Sheffield United.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : 90 MINUTES – 6.4.1996

Gary and Phil Neville of Manchester United are the cover stars of this edition of 90 Minutes, as the 95-96 season enters it’s final stages.

In news, Rangers are linked with a move to sign Danish striker Mikkel Beck, while Wolves have opened up a Cyber Cafe at Molineux.

Ruud Gullit has joined the BBC as a pundit for Euro 96, while Sasa Curcic has pledged his future to Bolton, even if they get relegated.

Cover stars Gary and Phil Neville get a three page interview, described as the most famous brothers in Manchester, after the Gallaghers.

Kevin Lloyd, AKA Tosh from The Bill, talks to 90 Minutes about his love of Derby County.

There is a full page profile of new Fulham manager Micky Adams.

90 Minutes Live canvasses opinions at Exter v Plymouth, asking if the recent stories about Mad Cow Disease will put fans off getting a burger at the match.

The magazine ends with a report on a celebrity match at Wembley between England and Scotland, which England won 2-1, ahead of the Euro 96 match between the professionals in just over two months time.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – NOVEMBER 2011

A Glum looking Carlos Tevez is the cover star of this week’s edition of When Saturday Comes, with a thought bubble stating that he won’t play with players who are only there for the money. A few weeks earlier, he had refused to come on as a substitute for Manchester City against Bayern Munich.

There is a look at Sion, expelled from the UEFA Cup but a pursuing the matter through the courts.

Brazil had recently played Ghana in a friendly at Craven Cottage, which saw a crush outside the ground of supporters trying to get in, with WSC looking at the events of that night.

In Scotland, it is reported that Rangers were on the verge of going bankrupt, a story which dominated Scottish football throughout 2012, which resulted in Rangers getting relegated to the fourth tier.

Truro City get a profile, currently in the Conference South, but with ambitions of being the first Cornish club to play in the Football League.

There is a photo feature of Birmingham City’s UEFA Cup tie against Braga, the first time in 50 years that European football had come to St Andrew’s.

Garry Cook had recently left Manchester City, and WSC looks at his successes at the City Of Manchester Stadium, to balance out the criticism he received over the manner of his departure, mocking the mother of one of City’s players.

The global appeal of English football is looked at, looking at Norwich City supporters across the world.

WSC also looks locally, wondering why it is considered a risk for English clubs to sign players from the lower leagues.

Talking of local issues, WSC looks at Hartlepool United, who are coming to terms with the fact they don’t have a local derby rival.

Match of the Month is the Conference clash between Gateshead and Cambridge United.

There is a look at the recent trend of clubs offering fans refunds after bad away results, asking if it is the right thing to do.

On a season long loan to Lille, there is a look at Joe Cole as he begins life in France.

There is a look back at George Best’s brief spell at Cork Celtic in 1975.

Socrates gets a profile after a spell in hospital due to Liver problems. He died the following month.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : 90 MINUTES – 24.2.1996

Dennis Wise and Dan Petrescu are the cover stars of this week’s edition of 90 Minutes, which has declared Chelsea as the season’s surprise package.

In news, Manchester United have taken Mark Fish on trial. United have also signed a new kit deal with Umbro worth £40m – £65m.

Leeds United have been ordered bu UEFA to upgrade their dressing rooms for Euro 96, at a cost of £500,000.

There is a three page spread on Chelsea, with 90 minutes describing it as their finest team since the 70s.

Clyde are facing Rangers in the Scottish Cup, and 90 Minutes has an interview with Clyde’s ageing Celtic legend Charlie Nicholas.

Also getting a feature is Blackpool, after it is claimed that their stadium is being haunted by the ghost of Admiral Nelson.

In competitions, you could spend a night with Paul Merson.

As Euro 96 approaches, there is a full page profile on the French team, so good, that David Ginola and Eric Cantona can’t get a game.

90 Minutes Live canvasses supporters at Coventry City v Manchester City for the worst refereeing decision they have ever seen.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.8.1989

It’s the kick-off of the 1989-1990 season, and Shoot’s famous League Ladders poster, which came free with this edition, is the cover image.

The magazine opens with Bryan Robson’s column, where is confident that Manchester United can win the title, and believes his side are ready to show their credentials against reigning champions Arsenal on the opening day of the season.

He also touches on the World Cup in Italy, coming up at the end of the season, predicting that it will be won by a European team and that England aren’t far off.

Shoot itself gets a feature. The reason for the trumpet blowing? Shoot had just celebrated it’s 20th anniversary.

Real Madrid have signed a young player, but in tragic circumstances, symbolically signing one year old Sergio Cunningham, after the death of his dad, former Real Madrid player Lawrie Cunningham.

Terry Butcher showed off his drumming skills in Stirling recently for the band Tonto. Shoot describes Butcher as a self confessed head banger who lists Iron Maiden as his favourite band.

Theo Snelders tells Shoot of his determination to get back into the Holland squad after being controversially dropped after the manager said he was too scared to play against Germany.

John Fashanu has just joined Shoot and uses his debut column to put an end to rumours that he wants to leave Wimbledon.

In posters, you can get one of new Everton signing Norman Whiteside, while Gazza advertises Brooks boots.

Graham Roberts uses his column to reveal the reason why he left Rangers to join Chelsea – a dressing room falling out with manager Graeme Souness.

In news, The Football League is negotiating for the use of Wembley Stadium for the Play-Off Finals.

John Robertson tells Shoot that he is glad to have rejoined Hearts from Newcastle United, believing it will be a boost to his chances of going to the World Cup if Scotland qualify.

Shoot isn’t the only one celebrating a milestone birthday, Match of the Day turns 25 and gets a full page feature.

Jimmy Greaves predicts how he things the league table will look in 1990, predicting Liverpool to take the title back from Arsenal, with Charlton, Luton and Southampton getting relegated.

Jan Molby gets a full page interview, telling Shoot he is desperate to become a regular starter for Liverpool again, and win back his place in Denmark’s squad.

Kevin Gallacher gets a double page profile, where he reveals Deacon Blue are one of his favourite bands, and met Ricky Ross at a concert for Paul Sturrock’s testimonial, and that Ross was more nervoud of meeting Dundee united players than they were of meeting him.

There is a full page feature on Gerry Francis, who is remaining loyal to Bristol Rovers despite financial troubles at the club, but warns they won’t have any success in the future unless they get a new stadium, with the club playing at Twerton Park in Bath.

Ray Wilkins has just rejoined Rangers, and has hit back at suggestions that English players who join the Ibrox club (Wilkins was the 13th to do so under Graeme Souness) are jeopardising their international career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 24.3.1984

It’s the League Cup Final, and this is reflected with both Everton and Liverpool being represented on the cover. Both teams are looking to make history. Liverpool by winning the trophy in four successive seasons, and Everton to win it for the first time.

The match gets a four page preview, with a series of top flight stars being canvassed for their opinion, and the consensus is that Everton will win.

There is a profile of Matchman Of The month, Davie Cooper of Rangers.

Also getting profiled is new Aston Villa signing Steve Foster, who is happy with the move as it means he won’t have to play against Peter Withe, who he rates as his toughest opponent.

Match assesses form of Liverpool and Everton in this season’s League Cup, based on the player ratings in Match Facts, with Everton edging out Liverpool by a score of 6.81 to 6.77.

Plymouth Argyle get profiled as they dream of a trip to Wembley after putting Derby County out of the FA Cup, with a Semi-Final against Watford at Villa Park standing in the way.

It’s also the League Cup Final in Scotland, with the game between Rangers and Celtic getting a double page preview. There is also a poster of Robert Prytz of Rangers.

Ratings seem to be a theme in this magazine, as Glenn Hoddle gets a go at rating Everton and Liverpool’s players.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mark Lawrenson, who says he wants to be a Commentator when he retires.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.3.1980

It’s the first Cup Final of the 1980s, as Wolves take on Nottingham Forest in the League Cup Final, and Shoot commemorates this by having Emlyn Hughes and John Robertson on the cover.

The match gets six pages, with Emlyn Hughes and John McGovern discussing the effect of their respective managers. It is a cup final which sees Nottingham Forest aiming to win the trophy for the 3rd successive season.

In Scotland, Derek Johnstone uses his column to welcome Ian Redford to Ibrox, having signed from Dundee for a Scottish record of £210,000.

Terry Venables uses his column to express his delight at George Best’s return to football with Hibernian, and wishes Alan Ball good luck in his role as Player/Manager at Blackpool.

Talking of Hibs, there is a feature on Peter Cormack, as he returns to the club where he started his career, after leaving for Nottingham Forest in the early 1970s.

Martin Thomas of Bristol Rovers gets a profile, as he is described as Wales next goalkeeper.

Norwich City are the subject of a Club Spotlight, and readers got a free poster.

There is a feature called Soccer’s Wasted Talent, looking at the players who are sitting on the bench for their club, such as Duncan McKenzie, Peter Barnes and Tony Currie.

Chris Hughton talks to Shoot about being happy at Spurs, and Steve Coppell issues a warning to Liverpool that Manchester United will fight until the very end for the title.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.4.1988

Terry Butcher is the cover star of Shoot as he makes a timely return from injury, with Euro 88 just around the corner.

As you open the magazine, Adrian Heath tells Shoot of his dismay at being singled out as a scapegoat by Everton fans when things don’t go well.

Cover star Butcher uses his column to declare he was back from injury, and that if he came through Rangers match against Hibs unscathed, he will be aiming for an England recall for the friendly in Hungary.

Butcher also defends his manager at Rangers, Graeme Souness, who has faced press criticism for a tackle he made in a European Cup tie against Steau Bucharest.

The Football League celebrates it’s centenary with a 16 team tournament at Wembley decided by the highest scorers in each four divisions. This competitions gets a four page profile.

In sponsorship news, England have signed a deal with Trebor Extra Strong Mints.

Bobby Barrett and his brother Lee get a full page feature as the lucky winners of a competition to travel to Turin to meet Ian Rush, and then see him in action for Juventus against Pisa.

In foreign news, Jean-Marie Pfaff is in dispute with Bayern Munich after they blocked him moving to Manchester United.

Another player in contract dispute, but possibly leaving rather than joining Manchester United is Norman Whiteside. Bryan Robson uses his column to say that such a departure would be a loss to United, amid rumours that Juventus want to sign him in a swap deal for Ian Rush.

St Mirren manager Alex Smith hits back at those who say the Scottish Cup holders are in crisis, by saying they will be back stronger than before.

With Euro 88 on the horizon, Shoot does a four page profile of Republic Of Ireland, with David Kelly warning John Aldridge and Niall Quinn that he is planning to keep them out of the side after a hat-trick on his debut against Israel.

Trevor Francis tells Shoot that he is not finished, at the age of 34, have left one Rangers (the Glasgow one) for another (the West London one) due a lack of games.

Despite being in the Second Division, Manchester City manager Mel Machin predicts his side will become the Liverpool of the 1990s. City’s main star is Paul Stewart, who says he gets embarrassed at being described as a million pound player.

A player worth a quarter of that is Leroy Rosenior, newly signed by West Ham, and off to a goalscoring start, gives an interview to Shoot.

Also off to a goalscoring start is Brian McClair at Manchester United, set to be the first United player in 20 years to score 20 league goals, but tells Shoot that he doesn’t consider himself to be a goalscorer.

The magazine ends with a full page on PFA Award winners John Barnes and Paul Gascoigne.