MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.8.1989

It’s the kick-off of the 1989-1990 season, and Shoot’s famous League Ladders poster, which came free with this edition, is the cover image.

The magazine opens with Bryan Robson’s column, where is confident that Manchester United can win the title, and believes his side are ready to show their credentials against reigning champions Arsenal on the opening day of the season.

He also touches on the World Cup in Italy, coming up at the end of the season, predicting that it will be won by a European team and that England aren’t far off.

Shoot itself gets a feature. The reason for the trumpet blowing? Shoot had just celebrated it’s 20th anniversary.

Real Madrid have signed a young player, but in tragic circumstances, symbolically signing one year old Sergio Cunningham, after the death of his dad, former Real Madrid player Lawrie Cunningham.

Terry Butcher showed off his drumming skills in Stirling recently for the band Tonto. Shoot describes Butcher as a self confessed head banger who lists Iron Maiden as his favourite band.

Theo Snelders tells Shoot of his determination to get back into the Holland squad after being controversially dropped after the manager said he was too scared to play against Germany.

John Fashanu has just joined Shoot and uses his debut column to put an end to rumours that he wants to leave Wimbledon.

In posters, you can get one of new Everton signing Norman Whiteside, while Gazza advertises Brooks boots.

Graham Roberts uses his column to reveal the reason why he left Rangers to join Chelsea – a dressing room falling out with manager Graeme Souness.

In news, The Football League is negotiating for the use of Wembley Stadium for the Play-Off Finals.

John Robertson tells Shoot that he is glad to have rejoined Hearts from Newcastle United, believing it will be a boost to his chances of going to the World Cup if Scotland qualify.

Shoot isn’t the only one celebrating a milestone birthday, Match of the Day turns 25 and gets a full page feature.

Jimmy Greaves predicts how he things the league table will look in 1990, predicting Liverpool to take the title back from Arsenal, with Charlton, Luton and Southampton getting relegated.

Jan Molby gets a full page interview, telling Shoot he is desperate to become a regular starter for Liverpool again, and win back his place in Denmark’s squad.

Kevin Gallacher gets a double page profile, where he reveals Deacon Blue are one of his favourite bands, and met Ricky Ross at a concert for Paul Sturrock’s testimonial, and that Ross was more nervoud of meeting Dundee united players than they were of meeting him.

There is a full page feature on Gerry Francis, who is remaining loyal to Bristol Rovers despite financial troubles at the club, but warns they won’t have any success in the future unless they get a new stadium, with the club playing at Twerton Park in Bath.

Ray Wilkins has just rejoined Rangers, and has hit back at suggestions that English players who join the Ibrox club (Wilkins was the 13th to do so under Graeme Souness) are jeopardising their international career.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 31.7.1982

The cover image is of Dino Zoff lifting aloft the World Cup trophy, as Shoot reviews the 1982 World Cup, won by Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a single page report of the final, with a statistical analysis of the tournament beside it.

There is then a double page profile of the three UK teams at the tournament – England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Shoot then does a more indepth report on the tournament, saying that overall it wasn’t good, but the performances of teams such as Algeria, Cameroon and Honduras meant that expanding it to 24 teams was a success.

Bryan Robson writes in his column that Brazil were the team of the tournament, England would have won it if they had Zico, and that the biggest disappointment was Diego Maradona.

Ron Greenwood is interviewed, saying it had been a great five years as England manager, and that he won’t use his role as an Advisor with the FA to interfere with new manager Bobby Robson.

Phil Thompson uses his column to state he was proud of England’s performances, and that if England weren’t to win it, he would have loved Brazil to do so.

Danny McGrain uses his column to express his pride at Scotland winning the youth version of the European Championship, as well as the emergence of players such as Ally McCoist, David Moyes, Neale Cooper and Scott McGarvey.

Malcolm Allison believes that he should have been appointed England manager, and told Shoot that. Shoot also profiled his current club, Portugese champions Sporting Lisbon.

Ray Wilkins provides a full page World Cup diary for Shoot. He had a shopping trip to Madrid ruined by the weather.

Shoot does a story on Kenny Dalglish, whose international career looks over at the age of 31 after being dropped during the World Cup by Jock Stein.

It wasn’t all about the World Cup. In domestic football, Eddie Gray has been appointed manager of Leeds United, which he describes as a mammoth task.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.5.1983

There’s a Scottish theme to this edition of Shoot, with Kenny Dalglish and Charlie Nicholas sharing the cover with Aberdeen, facing Real Madrid in the European Cup Winners Cup Final.

As you open the magazine, there are features on Dalglish and Nicholas, voted Most Exciting Player and Most Exciting Young Player respectively.

In news, Manchester United, Ipswich Town and West Ham United are showing an interest in Leicester City’s Gary Lineker, while West Bromwich Albion have denied that Martin Jol and Romeo Zondervan will be leaving the club.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to express his delight at being recalled to the England squad, and paying tribute to Manchester United team-mate Martin Buchan ahead of his testimonial.

Another United player with England ambitions is Gary Bailey, who tells Shoot that he is ready for a call-up. Shoot lists rivals for a place in the squad, which includes Andy Goram of Oldham Athletic.

Across Manchester, Kevin Bond tells Shoot of his delight at winning over Manchester City supporters following a difficult start to his time at the club.

Following Jimmy Case’s winning goal from a free-kick for Brighton in the FA Cup Semi-Final, Shoot does a double page spread on the importance of goals from set pieces.

There is a feature on 15 year old Dean Vokes, who won a competition to be Assistant Manager to Malcolm MacDonald at Fulham for a day. Fulham beat Charlton 2-1.

As the 1982-1983 season comes to an end, Shoot does a feature on four hat-trick during the season, by Clive Allen, Ian Rush, Luther Blissett and Gary brooke

Aberdeen’s match against Real Madrid gets previewed with Alex Ferguson doing a profile of the Aberdeen squad for Shoot.

There is also a profile of the Real Madrid squad.

Bobby Russell of Rangers uses the Tartan Talk column to reveal that he planned on emigrating to New Zealand as a teenager, but red tape stopped it, something he says he is grateful for in retrospect.

Phil Thompson uses his column to speak of his pride at winning his 7th title medal, a record for a player in English football, predicting that there will be more to come.

In West Germany, football authorities have expressed concern at falling attendances in the top flight.

Shoot does a feature on Andy Ritchie and Terry Connor, who have moved opposite ways in a player swap between Leeds ans Brighton.

England are hosting the European Youth Championship, with England manager Graham Taylor, who would be appointed senior manager in 1990, praising the youth football of neighbours and holders Scotland.

Gary Shaw uses his column to congratulate Aston Villa team-mate Peter Withe on being selected for the England team for their recent match against Hungary.

The magazine ends with a profile of Mike Flanagan of QPR, who reveals his favourite singers are Joe Jackson and Elkie Brookes.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 24.5.1986

Bryan Robson, in action for England, is the cover star as the 1986 World Cup gets closer.

The magazine opens with rumoured tansfer activity by the Old Firm, with Rangers wanting to sign Richard Gough (he would eventually sign in 1987, after a year at Tottenham Hotspur) from Dundee United and Andy Goram (It took until 1991, from Hibs, for him to join) while Celtic want to sign Stevie Clarke from St Mirren. That is ex Chelsea player and West Brom manager Steve Clarke.

Another Scottish player potentially on the move is John Robertson of Hearts, who has been attracting attention from Tottenham Hotspur.

With the World Cup getting closer, there is a double page spread previewing Poland’s chances.

Canada also get a preview. UK fans will get a glimpse of them before the tournament as they play England in a friendly at a 16,000 capacity venue, due to England manager Bobby Robson insisting that the game be played on grass, and not artificial grass that is used in Canada’s bigger stadiums.

Bryan Robson uses his column to argue the case for England as World Cup winners, giving a brief profile of the 22 players tasked with taking the trophy home from Mexico.

Swindon Town won the 4th division, and this gets a double page spread, with manager Lou Macari giving most of the credit to defender Colin Calderwood.

Also promoted and getting a double page spread were Norwich City.

In World Cup news, Socrates was left out of Brazil’s friendly against East Germany, while West Germany manager Franz Beckenbauer says this World Cup has come too soon for his team, but they have a great chance of winning the trophy in 1990.

The centre page poster is of AC Milan’s English duo of Ray Wilkins and Mark Hateley, settling in in Italy, complete with family portraits. Former Motherwell player Tom Hately wasn’t pictured, because he wasn’t born until 1989.

Charlie Nicholas uses his column to discuss the vacant manager’s position at Arsenal, suggesting that his preference is Alex Ferguson or Billy McNeill.

John Fashanu gets a full page profile, described as “articulate TV and radio star who listens to Dire Straits and Phil Collins”. His biggest ambition is to appear on The Cosby Show. Fashanu would be going to the World Cup in Mexico as a pundit for Nigerian TV. Fashanu describes himself as “Mean and nasty”

The magazine goes green for a few pages, with features on Northern Ireland and Plymouth Argyle.

There was an advert for the following week’s edition, which had a World Cup wallchart.

It was a World Cup that Trevor Francis won’t be playing. He tells Shoot of his disappointment of not being selected for England, and that he’s not planning on leaving Italy, where he is currently based.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.12.1989

Peter Beardsley, playing for England, is the cover star of Match, as England, Scotland and Republic Of Ireland have discovered their group opponents in the 1990 World Cup.

1989-1990 has been a season of violence on the pitch in English football, with Sports Minister Colin Moynihan calling for players who misbehave to be arrested. Bryan Robson and Terry Butcher hit back against such a suggestion.

England and Republic Of Ireland face each other in the 1990 World Cup groups, having met in Euro 88, while Scotland also face familiar opponents, Brazil, who they met in the 1982 World Cup group stages.

Gary Shaw, currently playing in Austria, is hoping to return to the Football League, but is still struggling from the effects of a knee injury.

Ajax are eyeing up English clubs for potential friendlies as they are currently serving a UEFA ban.

One English club playing a high profile friendly is Arsenal, who travel to Ibrox to take on Rangers in an Unofficial British Championship, with Arsenal midfielder Brian Marwood saying this match is an opportunity to enhance Arsenal’s reputation.

There is a feature on competition winners who got to meet the England team.

John MacPhail of Sunderland tells Shoot he still has the legs to take part in Sunderland’s promotion battle at the age of 34.

Talking on veterans, there is a full page profile of QPR’s midfield duo of Ray Wilkins and Peter Reid, both well into their 30s.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 9.11.1985

MEXICO HERE WE COME!! screams the headline on the cover of Match, as Northern Ireland head to Wembley looking for the result that will take them to the 1986 World Cup Finals.

The match gets a double page spread as soon as you open the magazine, featuring interviews with David McCreery and Glenn Hoddle. McCreery is in bullish mood, saying Northern Ireland will win on merit and not need any favours from England.

Gary Lineker uses his column to reveal that Frank Worthington was his footballing hero.

Match follows the progress of a young player they’ve adopted, Lee Martin of Huddersfield Town, as he gets ready to face Liverpool in the FA Youth Cup.

This player in question was a goalkeeper, and not to be confused with the Lee Martin who scored the winner in the 1990 FA Cup Final Replay.

There are posters of Northern Ireland and Aberdeen. Aberdeen had just beaten Hibs 3-0 in the Scottish League Cup Final.

Staying in Scotland, there could be a TV blackout of Scottish football due to a lack of agreement with broadcasters STV and BBC Scotland.

Match does a feature called Stars In The Shade, profiling players watching England’s top flight from the sidelines such as Alan Brazil, Michael Robinson and Gary Mabbutt.

David Speedie gets asked about his favourite things, his favourite music being Spandau Ballet, Sade and Barbara Dickson.

Match uses the ratings in their results service to do a feature on the best goalkeepers in England’s top flight, with Ray Clemence coming out on top with an average rating of 7.53 from 13 games.

Ray Wilkins, based in Italy with AC Milan, uses his column to declare that Michael Laudrup will be one of the stars of the 1986 World Cup.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10.4.1982

It’s the FA Cup Semi-Finals, and this is reflected on the cover with a player from each competing club – Leicester City, Queens Park Rangers, Tottenham Hotspur and West Bromwich Albion – are featured.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on the two games, with a player from each club giving their thoughts ahead of their game.

In news, Bobby Charlton was complimentary about Wigan Athletic, stating they had the potential to become a top flight club. They eventually would be, 23 years later.

After having their most successful season in the top flight, Brighton players are bringing out a pop record called “In Brighton”, described by captain Steve Foster as “It’s got a pop disco sound and it’s very complimentary about the team”

Talking of pop records, Northern Ireland have done one as well for the World Cup with former Eurovision winner Dana. It got better for the squad. As well as getting to do a record with Dana, they got a £77,000 bonus between them.

It’s all change at Everton with manager Howard Kendall placing his emphasis on young players, including goalkeeper Neville Southall, who he compared to Peter Shilton.

In competitions, you can win a trip to the World Cup Final in Madrid.

Phil Thompson uses his column to bemoan the standard of refereeing in Liverpool’s European Cup exit against CSKA Sofia, claiming they were robbed. Down to the Semi-Final stage, Thompson predicts that the final will be between Aston Villa and Bayern Munich,

There is a full page feature on club football in the USA.

There is a poster of Pat Jennings for a series called “World Cup Stars To Watch”. Jennings was rumoured to be attracting attention from clubs in North America. Not content with heading to Spain that summer, Jennings was also looking at trying to play in the 1986 World Cup.

In Scotland, the Scottish Cup is also at the Semi-Final stage, with both games being previewed. Danny McGrain’s column discusses a recent 5-0 win for Celtic against Rangers, but it wasn’t their Ibrox rivals they faced, it was a Hong Kong team with the same name, during a mid season break for Celtic.

Staying in Scotland, one of those Semi-Finalists, Forfar Athletic get previewed. Airdrie have tried a novel way to improve morale, by getting a comedian, Hector Nicol to entertain his team before matches. Nicol’s humour was described by Shoot as “Making Billy Connolly look like a choirboy”

With the World Cup approaching, Cameroon get a double page feature, with an interview with Francois Doumbe Lea and a profile of their manager, Branko Zutic.

Manchester City manager John Bond uses his column to clarify rumours about his son Kevin’s future, stating that he was staying at Maine Road.

In adverts, there is an advert for Panini’s World Cup sticker book, which is going to be free in Shoot in the coming weeks.

Going to the World Cup is Jim McLean, as part of Scotland’s backroom team. He combine that with his role as Dundee United manager, and Director at Tannadice, a role he has recently accepted.

1981-1982 was the first season of 3 points for a win in England, and Ray Wilkins uses his column to declare it a success, though admitting he’s not a fan of it.

In international news, El Salvador will only be taking 18 players to the World Cup due to costs, while Felix Magath faces a race against time to be fit for the World Cup due to injury, with the story accompanied by a picture of him being visited in hospital by Horst Hrubesch, Ernst Happel and Gunter Netzer.

In adverts, you could buy pyjamas in the colours of your favourite team’s kit – as long as you supported England, Northern Ireland or Argentina. There were also various club team options not pictured.

Gary Shaw uses his column to describe the European Cup Semi-Final draw against Anderlecht as “Ideal” as it avoided a trip behind the Iron Curtain (CSKA Sofia) and the favourites (Bayern Munich)

Shaw also comments on team-mate Allan Evans getting a Scotland recall, stating that playing against Dynamo Kiev in the previous round could be helpful for Scotland’s group game against the Soviet Union, as most of their squad is made up of Dynamo players.

He signs off by wishing Tottenham Hotspur good luck in their European Cup Winners Cup Semi-Final against Barcelona.

Villa and Spurs ties are previewed from the Spanish and Belgian viewpoints, with West Ham’s Francois Van Der Elst stating that the winners of Aston Villa v Anderlecht will go on to win the trophy.

The magazine ends with an interview with Martin Buchan, who states he is not planning to leave Manchester United, despite losing the captaincy.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.5.1982

Kevin Keegan is the cover star of Shoot as the 1982 World Cup in Spain approaches, and the 24 competing teams are getting ready for their final preparations.

As you open the magazine, Glenn Hoddle tells Shoot that he will only replicate his club form for England if he is given a run of games, while Tony Morley of Aston Villa fears he may miss out in Spain due to manager Ron Greenwood only liking to play one winger.

In news, Keith Burkinshaw and John Toshack have declared that three points for a win, introduced in 1981-1982 season, has been a success, while Gordon Taylor hit back at Trevor Francis and Mick Mills over their criticism of the timing of the PFA Player Of The Year Awards.

Shoot does a full page profile of Arsenal youngster Stewart Robson, who broke into the first-team straight from school.

In adverts, you could get a series of World Cup wallcharts for just £3.50, plus 50p for P and P.

In letters, Liam Farrington from Dublin writes in to protest about English born Tony Galvin being called up to the Republic of Ireland squad.

Gary Shaw uses his column to talk about his joy at Aston Villa reaching the European Cup Final, but also his disappointment that the second leg of their Semi-Final against Anderlecht was ruined by trouble on the terraces.

Ahead of Scotland’s World Cup opener, Shoot asks various Scottish players such as Alfie Conn, Frank McGarvey and Paul Hegarty what the starting 11 in Malaga on June 15th should be.

Shoot does a full page profile on Craig Johnston, who he says has passed his Anfield Apprenticeship, and is now a fully fledged first-team player.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to suggest that England won’t be putting out an experimental side in their friendly against Holland, ahead of the World Cup.

Talking of England, in World Cup Merchandise, you could buy a Memo Pad, complete with a photo of England’s official mascot, Billy Bulldog.

Karl-Heiz Rummenigge is interviewed ahead of the World Cup, and tells Shoot he fears that West Germany’s chances could be ruined by injuries.

It is revealed that Asa Hartford of Manchester City has an unusual hobby, collecting matchbook.

Motherwell were rocked by rumours that manager David Hay was set to resign, while Phil Thompson’s column comments on young players getting an opportunity to play at England’s biggest clubs.

Justin Fashanu uses his column to talk about change in football, as Nottingham Forest go through a transition after a successful period in the late 1970s.

Garry Thompson tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Coventry City, while Everton manager Howard Kendall says that Graeme Sharp is as good as Frank Stapleton.

The magazine ends with a profile of Gary Lineker, who reveals he wants to be a Bookmaker when his playing career ends.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.9.1979

The 1970s are almost over, but the focus is already on the first international tournament of the 1980s, Euro 80 in Italy, as Kevin Keegan, in action for England against Denmark, is the cover star of Shoot, ahead of the return qualifier between the two at Wembley.

England manager Ron Greenwood vows his side will attack Denmark, complimenting the Danes as England’s main rivals for qualification (only the group winners went to Italy), a point echoed by Northern Ireland manager Danny Blanchflower, whose side were also in the group.

Trevor Brooking was also wary of Denmark, stating that “Denmark’s breaks and power shooting a worry”

Newly appointed Denmark manager Sepp Piontek is interviewed for the game, stating that Denmark are aiming to use these qualifiers to boost their ranking for the 1982 World Cup Qualifiers, stating that Kevin Keegan was “World Class”, that he had a lot of knowledge of the England team, especially the two West Germany based players, Kevin Keegan and David Watson.

England won the match 1-0 and qualified for Euro 1980, going out in the group stage, while Denmark finished bottom of their qualifying group.

Denmark would have their revenge four years later when they would qualify for Euro 84 at the expense of England.

England were the only home nation in competitive action as Scotland and Wales had friendlies.

Scotland faced Peru, a side who had beaten them 3-1 in the previous year’s World Cup. Teofilio Cubillas, Peru’s talisman predicts a win for Scotland, as Peru had declined since the previous summer. Cubillas wasn’t able to confirm if he would be appearing at Hampden Park due to commitments with his club Fort Lauderdale Strikers.

Wales were in action in a friendly against Republic Of Ireland at Vetch Field, only the second meeting between the two sides, with Wales buoyed by Robbie James and Peter Nicholas scoring their first international goals that summer. Wales won the game 2-1.

Viv Anderson, now a columnist for Shoot, talks about the secret of Nottingham Forest’s success, having just been crowned European Champions. The secret, was Brian Clough’s man management. We probably knew that anyway.

In ads, there is an advert for a new football magazine called Top Soccer, with the headline “At last! Super NEW mag for young soccer fans” with Kevin Keegan on the cover of the first edition.

There is literally nothing about this magazine online, but i’d presume it was an IPC publication, seeing as it had been given an advertising platform in Shoot.

There was a free pull-out in this edition of Shoot, part of a series called “The Captains”, profiling captains of clubs in England and Scotland.

In letters, Ray Wilkins recent transfer to Manchester United has divided opinion, with Joseph Stanger wishing him good luck at Old Trafford, while David Ash from Catford expresses his disappointment that he didn’t stay to help Chelsea get promoted to Division One, pointing out that Trevor Brooking’s England career hasn’t suffered as a result of playing in the Second Tier.

Gregory Watts from Winkworth wants football matches extended to 120 minutes, while William Cook from Hoylake bemoans the fact that Liverpool have had their shirts sponsored by Hitachi.

Shoot give a double page spread to Rodney March’s retirement and the uncertainty as to where George Best’s next club will be.

Brighton, newly promoted to Division One get a club profile, where club Chairman Mike Bamber is dreaming of European football coming to Sussex.

Despite having made improvements to the Goldstone Ground, Bamber is planning to move the club away from the Goldstone Ground to a new stadium at a site in Waterhall at an estimated cost of £7m

It took 32 years for Brighton to get a new stadium, in Falmer, after a spell at an athletics stadium in Withdean, and a 2 year exile in Gillingham.

In international news, Shoot catches up with Lawrie Cunningham, recently signed for Real Madrid who face Valencia in their opening game. It was Valencia who face West Bromwich Albion in Europe the previous season , where Cunningham caught the eye of Real Madrid.

Meanwhile in Brazil, Garrincha has recently had a spell in hospital with health problems.

In Hertfordshire, Graham Taylor is trying to manage expectations of Watford, newly promoted to Division Two, after successive promotions, and the presence of a pop star chairman, in the shape of Elton John.

Panini took out an advert to announce that Football 1980 stickers would be given away by Shoot in January.

Danny McGrain writes that Celtic are going into the unknown ahead of their European Cup tie against Tirana. McGrain also argues that managers should have a transfer fee, following a rejected approach by Athletic Bilbao for Ipswich manager Bobby Robson.

On the back cover, was a team photo of Burnley.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.8.1979

Match action from Nottingham Forest v Liverpool is on the cover as the 1979-1980 season is close to kicking off. It was an appropriate choice for cover, as both sides had won League and European Cups in both 1978 and 1979.

In news, West Bromwich Albion met Real Madrid in a pre-season tournament in Spain, a chance for Albion players to say hello to former team-mate Lawrie Cunningham, who left The Hawthorns for The Bernebeu.

Meanwhile, Manchester United midfielder Mickey Thomas has announced his engagement to a beauty queen from Rhyl, Debbie Dean, who is the regining Miss Skol Lager.

Linfield’s signing of Lindsay McKeown, Steve McKee and Peter Dornan also feature in Shoot’s news section.

Liverpool made the most of their postponed game away to Wolves (Molineux was getting redeveloped, the ground not yet ready to host fixtures) to play a League Of Ireland XI at Dalymount Park.

Manchester United held their first ever Open Day, where supporters get to see a training session, having been entertained by a Police Dog Training Display and an Army Gymnastic Display. Supporters were charged one pound, and the proceeds went to the Variety Club Of Great Britain.

Gordon McQueen, in his column, says he’ll enjoy “Going to prison for a week”

He was speaking metaphorically, referring to United’s pre-season tour of Denmark and West Germany.

Meanwhile, Trevor Brooking speaks that West Ham might be recruiting continental players, specifically Dutch players, as British players “Cost too much”

Bristol City manager Alan Dicks is bemoaning the loss of several key players over the summer. He was proved right, City were relegated from the top flight, where they have never been back since, and almost went out of business a few years later.

In Ads, Puma were offering fans the chance to purchase a poster of their favourite Puma endorsing star for just 75p, including players such as Joe Jordan, Mario Kempes, Sammy McIlroy and Hans Krankl.

Clive Thomas, Football League referee was having his autobiography serialised in Shoot. In this week’s feature, he declares that referees should not fear the increase in analysis from TV coverage on Match Of The Day or The Big Match.

Andy Gray, in his column, is upset at the idea of the traditional England v Scotland game being cancelled due to crowd violence. The game in May 1979 had 400 arrests. Gray says it’s up to the fans to behave to ensure the fixture continues.

Gray also comments on the progress of his former club, Dundee United. United had a golden era in the 80s, winning the league in 1983, and reaching the UEFA Cup Final in 1987.

He is also glad that the League Cup Final now has live TV coverage. Who scored the winning goal in the 1980 League Cup Final? Andy Gray. How prophetic.

In letters, a reader writes warning Liverpool of the threat of Soviet champions Dinamo Tblisi in their forthcoming European Cup tie, and so it proved, with Tblisi winning 4-2 on aggregate. The following year, they won the European Cup Winners Cup.

A Manchester United supporter writes in to complain about United possibly signing Ray Wilkins from Chelsea, not rating him and saying the fee was too much, especially as United turned down Argentina World Cup duo Daniel Passarella and Ubaldo Fillol.

There is also a full page profile of AC Milan and a team poster.

Staying abroad, there is a full page feature on Real Madrid’s new major signing …….. England’s Lawrie Cunningham.