MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 15.3.1986

Sheffield Wednesday’s on form striker Garry Thompson is the cover star, in a week where Shoot speculates that Manchester United might be trying to sign Sammy Lee from Liverpool.

Lee is the subject of a double page feature, where he states he is aiming to make up for lost time after a disappointing 84-85 due to injuries and loss of form.

Lee was linked with Manchester United by Shoot, whose Danish defender John Sivebaek has revealed he joined United for money, while manager Ron Atkinson revealed that it was his goal against Republic Of Ireland in a World Cup Qualifier which prompted United to sign him, beating off competition from Spurs, Celtic, Atletico Madrid and Club Brugge.

With the World Cup approaching, Shoot looks at the chances of those wanting to go. They did a report on Terry Fenwick’s performance during QPR’s 1-1 draw with Luton, concluding that he is being wasted in midfield.

One player not going to Mexico was Remi Moses, who would be missing out through injury. Bryan Robson writes about this in his column, and also states that Mark Hughes wants to stay at Manchester United, and then promotes his fan club, which you can join for £3.50 a year if you live in the British Isles.

In news, Reading’s Andy Rogers was saved by the club’s physio after he collapsed during a recent game.

Two youngsters getting full page profiles were Nigel Spackman (Chelsea) and Paul Stephenson (Newcastle United)

Shoot reports that Barcelona are looking at Mark Hughes, while Gary Williams is set to leave Aston Villa after a bust-up with manager Graham Turner.

One player agreeing with his manager was Peter Rhoades-Brown of Oxford, whos manager Maurice Evans described him as inconsistent.

Jimmy Greaves Star Letter comes from a Scotland fan complaining that it was unfair that Belgoium were considering playing their Euro 88 Qualifier against Scotland to a neutral country, due to the fear of hooliganism.

John Bond gets a double page spread, with the recently appointed Birmingham City manager stating that he can revive the club. They were relegated in 1986, and almost get relegated again in 1987, before Bond was sacked.

In foreign news, Andreas Brehme has signed a pre-contract with Bayern Munich, while Janusz Torowski and Jaroslaw Biernat have both signed for Eintracht Frankfurt, but won’t be going to the World Cup, having claimed asylum in West Germany.

Shoot is in the World Cup mood, doing a double page feature on Denmark, comparing them to the Holland side of 1974 and 1978.

Peter Davenport’s chances of going to Mexico received an endorsement from his manager at Nottingham Forest, Brian Clough, who wrote a column to urge England manager Bobby Robson to put him on the plane.

Talking of managers, Kenny Dalglish picked up his first Manager Of The Month award, but defeat to Everton ruined his day when he was presented with the award.

A future manager, was Alan Curbishley of Charlton, who was on the pitch for them in 1986, leading their promotion charge as they aimed to reach the top flight for the first time since 1957.

In Scotland, a former Rangers man has done Celtic a favour, as Mo Johnston has had a run of form kickstarted by being dropped from the Scotland squad by Alex Ferguson.

Brighton get a full page profile, as they aim to be promoted back to the top flight after being relegated in 1983.

Returning to Scotland, Shoot previewed the Scottish Cup Quarter-Finals between Hibs and Celtic, and Aberdeen v Dundee. At the time of going to print, they were the only two Quarter-Finals definitely confirmed.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9.11.1985

Bryan Robson is the cover star of this week’s edition of Shoot, as he aims to lead Manchester United to their first title in 19 years.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on the decline of Ipswich Town, who have gone from title challengers to fighting against relegation, with stars deserting over the previous three years since Bobby Robson left to become England manager.

In news, Frank McAvennie suggests that John Robertson and/or Gordon Durie could be the next Scottish strikers to move to an English club. One player not moving from Scotland to England is Richard Gough, after Dundee United rejected a bid from Aston Villa to sign him.

Norman Whiteside won Young Player Of The Month, while Manchester United offered new contracts to Arthur Albiston and Remi Moses.

Meanwhile, Trevor Francis hits back at Malcolm MacDonald, who criticised his continued selection for the England team.

Shoot’s editorial pleads for English fans to behave whenever they are abroad, after England had been allowed to enter the qualifiers for Euro 88.

Gary Lineker gets a double page photo story of his recent hat-trick against Turkey, the 34th hat-trick by and England player since World War II.

Another young player doing well is Alan Dickens, who is hoping to break free from the shadows of Trevor Brooking.

You wouldn’t have seen any of Lineker or Dickens goals due to a TV blackout caused by a dispute between the governing body and boradcasters, so Shoot does a double page photo collage of the best goals in that time.

Mickey Thomas hits back at his critics, having just signed for West Brom, and hoping to keep them in Division One.

Argentina’s preparations for the World Cup in Mexico have been rocked by a dispute between manager Carlos Bilardo and players Daniel Passarella and Ubaldo Filol, after Bilardo declared the only player guaranteed a place in the squad was Diego Maradona.

Terry Venables criticises Andoni Goicochea of Athletic Bilbao, after his playacting got a Barcelona player sent-off in a recent game between the sides.

Meanwhile, Michael Laudrup urges his club Juventus to sign his 16 year old brother Brian, who he describes as being better than him.

Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson, hoping to lead the club to a 3rd successive title, states that any team wanting to win the title can’t afford to lose more than four games.

Celtic won the league with six defeats that season with Aberdeen finishing 4th, with Ferguson leaving Aberdeen soon afterwards.

Meanwhile, Watford defender Nigel Callaghan concedes he won’t be going to the World Cup, but wants to be an England player beyond 1986.

Shoot interviews a player from each division to see what life as a footballer is really like, with Frank Lampard of 4th division Southend revealing that the club are considering flying to their away match at Wrexham.

In Scotland, 21 year old Andy Goram has caused a sensation by getting his first international call-up and keeping a clean sheet in the friendly against East Germany, as he provides competition for regular choice Jim Leighton.

Based in the North-West of England, Goram was contacted by Arthur Albiston of Manchester United to offer him a lift to the squad.

Talking of Scottish footballers, Charlie Nicholas uses his column to state that he won’t be signing for Liverpool.

Staying in Scotland, St Mirren get a full page profile.

Jimmy Greaves Star Letter came from Jeremy Butler from Southampton, who complains that teams like Canada devalues the World Cup, but Jimmy disagrees with him.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 27.12.1980

Santa Claus of North Pole United in the cover star of Shoot, as the first Christmas of the 1980s approaches.

Except, that it’s not Santa Claus, it’s a footballer dressed up as him. All will be revealed on page 2.

Out mystery Santa is someone who enjoys dressing up in red and white, Tony Woodcock of Arsenal.

Shoot gets in the Christmas spirit by suggesting presents for various football personalities, with a razor for bearded Aston Villa player Dennis Mortimer, while Watford chairman Elton John is suggested a piano with a TV screen so that he can watch Watford matches while he is on tour. I’m not sure that has actually been invented. I might just try and copyright that.

Shoot reviews the first-half of the English league season, with Liverpool and Aston Villa level on points at the top, with Liverpool looking to become the first team since the 1930s to win 3 titles in a row, while Aston Villa are looking for their first title in 71 years.

Eamonn McCabe, Sports Photographer Of The Year, gets a double page spread showing his favourite photos from 1980, while there is a competition to win a camera.

Ray Clemence uses his column to look back at the year, with the high of Liverpool winning the league and a low of England’s group exit at the European Championship.

There is a double page photo collage of Wales and England’s recent World Cup Qualifiers, with the headline “Spain – Here We Come”.

Wales didn’t make it to Spain, and England just about qualified.

Liverpool’s reserve team gets a full page feature, asking four of their players – Ian Rush, Howard Gayle, Steve Ogrizovic and Richard Money – what it’s like to play for Liverpool’s reserves.

Liverpool’s title rivals Aston Villa are featured on the next page, looking at their “Dunfermline connection”, as two players from the Fife town, Allan Evans and Ken McNaught, playing their part in Villa’s title bid.

In news, Graham Gooch is training with West Ham to keep himself fit during Cricket’s off-season.

Shoot does a feature on “Forgotten Heroes”, the players who are struggling to get first team action in 1980.

Dundee get a team poster while Phil Neal gets a player profile. His favourite music is Michael Jackson, Gerry Rafferty and ELO.

There is a joint interview with Peter McCloy (Rangers) and Pat Bonner (Celtic) about what it’s like to play in goal for an Old Firm team.

Staying in Scotland, Gordon McQueen uses his column to look back at 1980, and reveals that a clairvoyant that a great 1981 has been predicted for him.

Aston Villa travel to Brighton over Christmas, and John Gregory of Brighton, a former Villa player, tells Shoot that the club deserves success.

In South America, Uruguay were hosting a tournament to celebrate 50 years since the first World Cup, involving all former winners. England declined the option as it would have involved postponing league games over Christmas. Meanwhile, Shoot does a joint interview with Diego Maradona and Alfredo Di Stefano.

Clive Allen uses his column to state that he is looking forward to Crystal Palace’s trip to Southampton, mainly for the opportunity to meet Kevin Keegan.

John Chiedozie of Leyton Orient is profiled, with his manager describing his as “England’s best winger”

Unfortunately for Ron Greenwood, he was already declared himself for Nigeria.

Andy Gray writes in his column about how injuries have benefitted Wolves, as it has presented first-team opportunities to some of their promising youngsters.

Manchester United get featured, with Shoot focusing on the fanaticism of their fans, suggesting that girls born in Manchester are likely to be called Louise (after Lou Macari) or Samantha (after Sammy McIlroy)

Shoot does a double page spread on players they predict to be “England’s Superstars Of The 1980s”, listing players such as Craig Johnston, Gary Shaw, Steve McMahon, Remi Moses, Sammy Lee, Gary Mabbutt, Peter Beardsley and Adrian Heath to make an impact in the upcoming decade.

There is a photo compilation of the biggest footballing moments of 1980, while there is a calendar for 1981.

With 18 months to go, the countdown to the 1982 World Cup is already underway, with Spanish clubs spending a combined £50m modernising their stadiums to host games, with Shoot giving a club by club breakdown.

Peter Shilton uses his column to champion Terry Butcher’s cause for a place in the England team, and reveals he’s always been a fan of Tottenham due to the way they played football in the 60s.

Derek Johnston’s column recalls Andy Cameron’s stand-up routine at the Player Of The Year Awards where he made fun of players of every club, including his beloved Rangers.

There is also a feature on managers such as Dave Sexton, Brian Clough, Ron Saunders and Lawrie McMenemy who have all went on to bigger things despite experiencing the sack early in their career.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 18.4.1981

John Wark, in action with Nottingham Forest’s Stuart Gray, is the cover star of Shoot, previewing cup Semi-Finals in both England and Scotland, as title chasing Ipswich Town face Manchester City at Villa Park.

The editorial, calls for a change in the structure of English football, claiming there are too many games (there were 42 games in England’s top flight that season) as the national team is struggling as a result of players being too tired.

Shoot previews both FA Cup Semi-Finals, making the bold prediction that the final will be Wolves v Ipswich. The final, was Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester City. They also predict that it would be an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final. They were half right, as it was Rangers v Dundee United.

Andy Gray has a column in this edition, focusing on Scotland’s recent World Cup Qualifier against Northern Ireland (which finished 1-1), complaining about the defending for Northern Ireland’s goal, and stating that Scotland were confident of getting a good result in the return game in Belfast (It finished 0-0)

He states that Scotland were happy with two wins and two draws, but had expected the two wins to be at home rather than away.

He also previews the FA Cup Semi-Finals, unsurprisingly predicting his Wolves team would beat Spurs, and that Ipswich would beat Man City. He’s got a future in the punditry game, that boy.

In news, Arsenal are battling with Inter Milan, Juventus, Bayern Munich and Hamburg for Michel Platini, set to leave St Etienne at the end of the season, and TV Commentator Martin Tyler has a book about the history of the FA Cup Final ahead of this year’s game, the 100th FA Cup Final.

For just £1.60 plus P and P, you could have a framed portrait of the 1981 Aston Villa team. To be fair, they did win the league that season.

There is a double page poster of all four FA Cup Quarter-Finals, and the goals which decided them.

Derek Johnstone and Danny McGrain take it in turns to do a Scottish football column for Shoot, and it was Johnstone’s turn, hoping for an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final, so that Rangers could get the chance to avenge their defeat to Celtic in the 1980 final.

There is then a double page poster of the Home Nations (England in a friendly v Spain, Scotland v Northern Ireland and Turkey v Wales World Cup Qualfiers) and Republic of Ireland (v Belgium) internationals. Shoot describes Wales as “The best placed Home Nation to reach the finals”

As it turned out, Wales were the only home nation not to reach the 1982 World Cup finals.

Rotheram United, battling for promotion to the Second Division, get a full page profile, focusing on the success of their young manager, Ian Porterfield, with a team poster overleaf.

After 14 years without the league title, there wasn’t much cheer for Manchester United supporters in 1981, but they did win one trophy that year …….. Shoot’s Best Programme of all England’s top flight clubs.

In 1981, a copy of United Review cost 20p, had 24 pages and only 1 page of adverts.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a feature on promising youngsters at West Bromwich Albion dubbed “Atkinson’s Angels” featuring Remi Moses and Bryan Robson. Within six months, Robson, Moses and Atkinson would all have left Albion for Manchester United.

On the back page, there is a profile of Brighton star Steve Foster, pictured with trademark headband, where he reveals his favourite singers are Paul McCartney, George Benson and Dennis Waterman.