MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : ROLLING STONE – 28.10.2010

We go back to late 2010 with a Rolling Stone on the cover of Rolling Stone, as they exclusively bring you Keith Richards memoirs.

Earlier in the month was what would have been John Lennon’s 70th birthday, and there was a tribute concert which Lady Gaga performed at, which was covered by Rolling Stone.

In news, Kid Rock is facing a battle against imposters and lookalikes who go out in public pretending to be him, while The Who are plotting to go on tour in 2011.

Robert Plant is the subject of a Q and A, where he reveals himself to be a fan of Los Lobos.

At the time, halfway through his presidency (though he would win a second term in 2012), there are seven pages dedicated to Barack Obama’s presidency, and the case as to why it has been a success.

The serialisation of Keith Richards memoirs gets twelve pages of coverage, focusing on Rolling Stones success in the 1960s and 1970s.

That was three times as many pages dedicated to Kings Of Leon, as they get set to release their 5th album, looking to follow on from the success of their 4th, Only By The Night.

That album gets reviewed in this edition, getting 4 stars out of 5, being described as “Their U2 moment”

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : KERRANG – 22.6.2002

Matt Bellamy of Muse is the cover star of this edition of Kerrang, which promises to reveal his dark side.

In news, Joey Jordison of Slipknot is unmasked, as he reveals his sideband Murderdolls.

Kerrang looks at the best of the web, and with the World Cup ongoing, lists a website dedicated to ugly footballers as their website of the week.

Cover star Bellamy gets five pages, revealing that he brought ouija boards into school as a ten year old.

There is a look at actors trying to be rock stars, as Jack Black and Jared Leto have gone into the recording studio with their respective bands.

Barney Greenway of Napalm Death shows Kerrang around his house, including a poster of Aston Villa’s 1996 League Cup winning team, and a Villa mug he has had for 12 years.

In album reviews, Dreamland by Robert Plant gets 3 out of 5.

In boxsets, both Buffy and spin-off show Angel both get 4 out of 5.

In upcoming concerts, Queens Of The Stone Age were gig of the week, while Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Vines were recommended.

The magazine ends with an advert for the following week’s edition of Kerrang, which offers free stickers.

50 YEARS OF TOP OF THE POPS : AUG 15 – AUG 21

It’s a Royal Edition this week, so put on your best clothes and be on your best behaviour.

This week saw the 37th anniversary of Elvis Presley faking his death to open up a chip shop. Remember, he’s not dead, he’s just having a break. The week after he faked his death, Legs and Co did a tribute. It’s what he would have wanted.

No even a Number 1 in 2002 off the back of a sportswear commercial could tempt him out of retirement.

That day, was Madonna’s 19th birthday. It’s unknown wether that ruined it. On her 34th birthday, Nottingham Forest played Liverpool in the first ever Sky Super Sunday. It’s unknown if she watched it.

Meanwhile, sharing a death date with Elvis, is Ronnie Drew of the Dubliners.

Born the day after Madonna, a woman who believes Heaven is a place on earth, and her surname is the most heavenly place on earth.

Kevin Rowland (no relation to Kelly Rowland) from Dexy’s turned 61 this week. They did more than one song you know.

So, we’ve had The King Of Rock N Roll, The Queen Of Pop, and now, John Deacon from Queen, 63 this week.

Queen’s TOTP appearances were rare. It’s a pity they didn’t do one for Radio Ga Ga. It would have looked amazing the whole audience doing the hand clappy bit at the chorus.

And now, Europe, who actually came from Europe (Sweden) with The Final Countdown.

Their follow-up single, The Final 15 To 1, didn’t chart so high.

It’s an onslaught of poodle hair rockers now. Led Zep’s lack of singles denied Robert Plant any TOTP action until his solo career.

Phil Lynott would have got his Bus Pass this week.

Joe Strummer would have been 62 this week. Here’s his only TOTP appearance, pretending to be a football commentator.