Bryan Robson, in action against Notts County, is the cover star, with the headline “Robbo’s Back”, as he is interviewed in this edition.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature on Wales European Championship Qualifier in Germany, where Wales need a draw to virtually qualify for the finals in Sweden.

Jimmy Greaves assesses the two teams and predicts a win for Germany, and so it proved, with Germany winning 4-1.

Bryan Robson’s interview is part of Shoot’s preview of England’s European Championship Qualifier against Turkey. Turkey had been good opponents for Robson, with 5 goals in his 3 previous appearances against them.

England’s previous game against Turkey saw Robson left out of the squad, and he thought his international career was over at the age of 34, but his recent form for Manchester United saw him earn a recall.

As it turned out, the game against Turkey was Robson’s last cap for England.

Another player making an England comeback was Stuart Pearce, who explains that he was left out of the squad for the recent friendly against Germany as he was serving a domestic suspension.

Elsewhere in the group, Republic Of Ireland face a crunch game in Poland, and Shoot interviews Mick McCarthy in preparation of this.

In news, Charlie Nicholas had all his medals stolen after a burglary at his house, while Celtic have had a bid rejected for Terry Phelan, while Chelsea are planning a move to sign Matt Le Tissier.

Also in Scotland, John Robertson of Hearts gets a double page interview where he says that Hearts are determined to bounce back after defeat against Celtic, their first of the season. Robertson also gives Shoot the lowdown on his Hearts team-mates.

Peter Ndlovu of Coventry City gets interviewed s he adjusts to life in England, telling Shoot that he mostly listens to the radio and watched TV.

Also adjusting to life in a new country is David Platt, who tells Shoot he is enjoying life in Italy, despite Bari not winning a game and their manager resigning.

Talking of English players in Italy, former AC Milan striker Mark Hately rubbishes former Bari striker Paul Rideout’s claim that no English striker has come back from Italy a better player.

I wonder did they discuss the matter a few months later in the dressing room when Rideout signed for Rangers?

Talking of Rangers, a reader writes to Jimmy Greaves to say that Rangers will continue to be minnows on a European stage due to a lack of competition in Scotland, while another reader asks about the possibility of Leeds winning the league, and Greaves says they need Lee Chapman to start scoring in order for that to happen.

In competitions, you could win a pair of Quaser boots, and get to meet Gary Lineker, Matt Le Tisser or Charlie Nicholas at one of their respective team’s home games.

Tony Cottee gets a profile, revealing that if he wasn’t a footballer, he would be a Fireman, or work for his dad as an Insurance Broker.

In ads, there was an advert for a teen mag called Look-In (possibly an IPC publication, I can’t verify) which had Rik Mayall as it’s cover star, talking about his role in Drop Dead Fred.

Alongside that, is an advert for the following week’s edition of Shoot, which comes with free Pro Set cards.

The magazine ends with a double page feature on Scotland’s European Championship Qualifier in Bucharest where a win would virtually guarantee qualification to the finals.

They lost, but other results went their way which meant they made it to Sweden.



The 1985-1986 season is nearing it’s end, and Malcolm Shotton of Oxford United is the cover star of Shoot, with the club having won their first major piece of silverware, the League Cup, after a 3-0 win over QPR.

Mark Hughes talks about his transfer from Manchester United to Barcelona, admitting that he should have done what Kevin Keegan did when leaving Liverpool, announce his plans to leave at the start of the season, as the protracted move turned out to be a distraction.

Hughes signed an 8 year contract with Barcelona, and he says this will be his only club on the continent. As it turned out, he did emulate Kevin Keegan, by playing in Germany, joining Bayern Munich on loan, before returning to Old Trafford in 1988. He never played for a club on the continent in the final 14 years of his career.

In adverts, there’s an advert for the following week’s edition, which has a free World Cup stickerbook, as well as previews of the FA and Scottish Cup Finals.

Bryan Robson uses his column to sing the praises of Paul McGrath, stating that he wishes he was English as he’d walk into their defence. He comments on his top 11 players of the season.

Shoot previews the three European Finals, singing the praises of Terry Venables, who Shoot believes is set to become Barcelona’s first European Cup winning manager, totally dismissing the chances of their opponents Steaua Bucharest.

Shoot does a double page photo collage of the recent League Cup Final, where Oxford beat QPR 3-0.

Peter Reid writes in his column that Everton have the grit to win the title.

Reid is also complimentary of West Ham, whose young defender George Parris gets profiled, described as “A new Billy Bonds”

Andy Goram, a recent debutant for Scotland, despite being born in England, tells Shoot he wants to join a club in Scotland.

Football in Sheffield gets a double page spread, as both clubs yo-yo between divisions, with Shoot pointing out that there hasn’t been a top flight Derby between United and Wednesday in 18 years.

Bruce Rioch gets interviewed after just being appointed manager of Middlesbrough, talking about what he has learnt from managers in his career, especially Tommy Docherty.

Iraq get a preview ahead of Mexico 86, with their style of play moulded by the influx of British managers in the Middle East in the late 70s, and the current Brazilian manager they have, Edu (not the ex Arsenal player), who is Zico’s brother.

Davie Cooper is interviewed, stating that the appointment of Graeme Souness as manager was a “Bombshell”, but is a top class appointment.

Dual nationality Vince Mennie of Dundee is interviewed, stating that he wants a call-up to the Scotland team, and turned down an Under 21 call-up for West Germany in order to achieve his dream.

Ron Saunders has responded to West Brom’s relegation by having a clear-out of his squad.

Staying in the West Midlands, Birmingham City manager John Bond has appealed to local businesses for help to secure funding to bring Trevor Francis back to St Andrews.

The magazine ends with a double page profile of Sandy Jardine, aiming to win the Scottish League and Scottish Cup with Hearts, 14 years after winning the 1972 European Cup Winners Cup with Rangers.


The other way around from the movie series, it is Bond sending rather than receiving an SOS, as Birmingham City manager John Bond wants to bring cover star Trevor Francis beck to St Andrews from Sampdoria.

As you open the magazine, Mark Hughes tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Manchester United, amidst rumours of a move to Barcelona.

In news, Terry Venables is linked with a move to Spurs at the end of the season, while leaving White Hart Lane could be Ally Dick, linked with a move to Hibs.

In World Cup news, Billy Bingham hits back at criticism of Northern Ireland’s preparation being against heavyweight sides such as Denmark and France, while Scotland manager Alex Ferguson has added Archie Knox and Craig Brown to his backroom staff for their campaign in Mexico.

Cover star Francis tells Shoot he is still available for England, having missed a recent friendly due to injury, and suggests he could create a place for himself in right midfield in Mexico.

Bryan Robson uses his column to state that the recent signing of Terry Gibson could be a boost for Manchester United in the title race.

In Scotland, Falkirk winger Jimmy Gilmour is playing so well, he is drawing comparisons to his uncle, former Celtic winger Jimmy Johnstone.

Crystal Palace manager Steve Coppell, only 30, tells Shoot that his side have had to change their style of play in order to get results, after previously missing out despite playing well.

Having saved Manchester City and Swansea City from relegation, John Bond is looking for a hat-trick by keeping Birmingham City up. In order to do this, he tells Shoot he wants to bring Trevor Francis back to the club, after Francis left to join Nottingham Forest in 1979 in England’s first £1m transfer.

Gary Mabbutt gets scouted by Shoot during Tottenham Hotspur’s match against Nottingham Forest, stating that he was exposed against a striker like Peter Davenport.

Back to Scotland, and Aberdeen’s John Hewitt tells Shoot that Dons manager Alex Ferguson is hard to please.

West Brom’s George Reilly tells Shoot he is happy at The Hawthorns after a short spell at Newcastle United.

Kenny Swain tells Shoot that he believes his experience of winning the title with Aston Villa in 1981 will help Portsmouth as they aim to get promoted to the top flight for the first time in 27 years.

West Ham goalkeeper Phil Parkes is having the best season of his career, and owes it to giving up booze after a drink driving ban in January 1985.

Ian Rush uses his column to praise his Liverpool team-mate Sammy Lee, who is celebrating his 27th birthday thsi week.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a double page spread on how Sunderland fans are losing patience with Lawrie McMenemy, after failing to launch a promotion bid.

The magazine ends with a “Focus On …..” Gordon Durie. His favourite bands are Depeche Mode and Simple Minds.


Action from a match between Stoke City and Manchester City is the cover image as the the 1970-1971 season approaches it’s final stages, with Shoot asking if Leeds or Arsenal will be Champions.

Shoot does a double page spread where they interview players such as Nobby Stiles, Glyn Pardoe, John Sissons, Bobby Gould and Mark Lazarus about what it is like to score at Wembley.

Even though he is a defender, Bobby Moore uses his column to declare that matches are won in midfield, and commenting on who his favourite midfieldes are.

Joe McBride of Dunfermline Athletic answers questions submitted by Shoot readers, with Shoot giving a list of upcoming interviewees, including Peter Shilton, Johnny Giles and Steve Perryman.

Peter Shilton gets given a full page by Shoot to explain how he manages to kick the ball so far up the field.

There is a poster of Sunderland defender Colin Todd.

Scotland are in action against Belgium in a European Championship Qualifier, with Shoot noting that history was on Scotland’s side, as they had a better record in head to head meetings between the two sides.

Belgium won the match 3-0. Scotland and Belgium would see a lot of each other over the next 16 years, being paired together in Qualification for 1980, 1984 and 1988, as well as 1972.

England were also in European Championship action, away to Malta, with Shoot’s preview pointing out that Malta have the ability to hold out against England. England won the match 1-0.

Shoot previews the title run-in between Leeds and Arsenal, listing their remaining fixtures but sitting on the fence with regards to who will win it.

Arsenal won the league that season, finishing 1 point clear of 2nd place Leeds, and then added the FA Cup, becoming the 2nd side in the 20th Century to win the League and FA Cup double.

John Hollins is interviewed, stating that he studies Bobby Charltopn and Billy Bremner in an attempt to be a better player, stating that he wants to be part of England’s squad for the 1974 World Cup.

Dick Staite of Clyde is interviewed, and he states that the person he would like to meet most is Alexander Dubcek, former Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia.

Alan Ball uses his column to state that stay away fans are affecting team morales, as players find it difficult to play in front of empty stands.

Peter Simpson previews Arsenal’s trip to Anfield, claiming that his side feel unbeatable.


August began for me at Wilgar Park, seeing Linfield take on Dundela in a Friendly.

The following night, was another Pre-Season Friendly, as I was on the road to see Manchester United take on Sampdoria at Lansdowne Road.

That weekend, I was travelling some more, heading to Edinburgh for a weekend away, getting some Street Art photos and taking in Edinburgh City v Montrose.

When I returned home, I was out getting some Street Art photos, the aftermath of Hit The East Festival in Eats Belfast.

The following weekend, the Irish League season started, with Linfield taking on Carrick Rangers at Windsor Park, followed by a midweek trip to Ards and a trip to Dungannon Swifts.

As soon as the final whistle blew at Stangmore Park, I was straight back to Belfast to see Amy MacDonald perform at Custom House Square.

A few days later, I was back at Custom House Square to see Blossoms warm up for Kasabian, or so I thought, as Kasabian pulled out at the last minute.

A few days after that, I was back at Custom House Square, to see Ocean Colour Scene in concert.

The following day, I headed to Windsor Park to see Linfield take on Ballymena United.

My photo adventures for August ended by getting snaps of murals of Jimmy Cricket, Jimmy Nesbitt, Jimmy Young and Carl Cox.

Dundela v Linfield

Manchester United v Sampdoria

Manchester United v Sampdoria Photo Album

Edinburgh Street Art

Edinburgh Street Art Photo Album

Edinburgh City v Montrose

Edinburgh City v Montrose Photo Album

East Belfast Street Art

East Belfast Street Art Photo Album

Linfield v Carrick Rangers

Ards v Linfield

Dungannon Swifts v Linfield

Amy MacDonald live at Custom House Square

Amy MacDonald live at Custom House Square Photo Album

Blossoms live at Custom House Square

Blossoms live at Custom House Square Photo Album

Ocean Colour Scene live at Custom House Square

Ocean Colour Scene live at Custom House Square Photo Album

Linfield v Ballymena United

The Three Jimmys and Carl Cox

The Three Jimmys Photo Album

Carl Cox Photo Album


Having just broken into the Everton team, teenage sensation Wayne Rooney give an interview to When Saturday Comes. Well, sort of.

A blank speech bubble represents the fact that Everton manager David Moyes has blocked media requests to interview his young player.

The editorial focuses on racism in football, most notably at the European Championship Qualifier between Slovakia and England, but warns that football authorities in England need to address concerns closer to home.

There is a profile of former Belgium goalkeeper Jean-Marie Pfaff, now forging a new career as a Reality TV star in a Flemish version of The Osbournes.

There is a feature on four clubs at differing ends of the football pyramid who are looking to move out of their current ground to a new one – Wimbledon, Chelsea, York City and Brentford.

In Scotland, there is a feature on the race for one of the more invisible honours, 3rd place, aka The Best Of The Rest after Rangers and Celtic, looking at those clubs aiming for that spot.

A more curious phenomenon in recent years was Masters Football, which WSC likened to ageing rock stars only playing hits from 20 years previously.

There is a feature on “lost footballers”, big money signings on high wages. The poster boy of this feature is Mark Bosnich, earning £40,000 in Chelsea’s reserves.

This edition focuses on young players, with a look at the number of French coaches at underage level in England.

Cover star Wayne Rooney is part of a feature looking at the history of hype of young players in English football.

There is also a feature on club football in Czech Republic, due to improved perfomances in Europe this season, with many teams boosted by Euro 96 stars coming home to play their club football.

Yeovil Town get a feature, so long a famous Non League giantkiller, and now on the verge of joining the giants they used to kill.

The rivalry between Cardiff City and Swansea City gets a feature, being described as becoming a poisonous affair in recent years.

The magazine ends with a brief look at the history of Cheltenham Town’s highlights and lowlights.

THE FRIDAY FIVE – 1.12.2017

1. Tom Grennan – Found What I’ve Been Looking For
2. Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds – If Love Is The Law
3. Sia – Santa’s Coming For Us
4. Embrace – Wake Up Call
5. The Divine Comedy – Something For The Weekend

First of all, an apology. To the entire nation of Scotland. Yes.

Yesterday was St Andrew’s Day and I forgot to do a themed chart last week. So, belatedly, here is a St Andrew’s Day chart, celebrating two of the best things on earth – Scotland and people called Andrew.


1. Pilot – Magic
2. Simple Minds – She’s A River
3. The View – Blondie
4. Aztec Camara – Somewhere In My Heart
5. Strawberry Switchblade – Since Yesterday


1. Wax – Bridge To Your Heart
2. Wham – Freedom
3. Depeche Mode – Never Let Me Down Again
4. INXS – Afterglow
5. Primal Scream – Jailbird

Sorry to Oasis, Duran Duran and OMD, but this chart is for Andrews only, no Andys.

It was announced that Blossoms will be supporting Noel Gallagher on his European tour next year. Fingers crossed they’ll be supporting him on his UK dates as well. The fact they’ll be touring in 2018 means we can hopefully expect new music from them as well. They’re brilliant by the way. If you haven’t already, you should check them out.

If there are any readers in the South-East of England, Victorious looks like it has a decent line-up on the Friday night : Lightning Seeds, Shed Seven and Kaiser Chiefs all playing on the Friday. Admittedly, Libertines headlining is underwhelming. Still, you can just use the time to get a bite to eat/go to the bar/go home early. Not going to lie, i’m jealous of that line-up.

….. and talking of Shed Seven, they’ve announced a Belfast gig to go with their rearranged concerts that were recently cancelled. Now that’s what I call a stroke of luck. I’ll be trying to get a ticket later this morning.

Finally, it’s the World Cup draw today. I’ll be doing a themed chart for each group with songs by artists from the countries when it comes along in June. I’d rather be including Baltimora than Yello to be honest. I’m over it, i’m over it. Ok, i’m still not over it. If Switzerland end up in a group with Panama, Russia and Iran, I might just cry.


Kenny Dalglish is the cover star of Football Monthly as the 1982 World Cup approaches, a tournament he will be playing in for Scotland.

There are rumours that the management duo of Brian Clough and Peter Taylor might be breaking up, with Taylor wanting to become a manager in his own right.

Arnold Muhren gets profiled as one of the best foreign players in England, while English players could be set for moves to Italy after the Italian FA passed a rule to allow teams to have two foreign players in Serie A.

Barry Davies writes a column where he praises Bobby Robson, describing him as a future England manager, while another columnist praises Stewart Robson of Arsenal, predicting he could be playing top flight football for 20 years.

In Northern Ireland, John Jameson of Glentoran is profiled, revealing that his middle name is Charles, and that he is named in tribute to John Charles.

In Scotland, Ruud Krol of Holland expects them to get to the Second Phased of the World Cup, with the Dutch having recently face Scotland in a friendly.


Running away with the league title, Mark Hughes is the cover star as Match asks if this is Untied’s best ever team.

Also making a good start was Reading, who secured the record for most successive wins at the start of the season with a win at Newport, and they get three pages.

Frank McAvennie gets a full page profile, with opposing players who have faced West Ham giving their opinions of him, after 10 goals in his first 11 games for West Ham.

Former Manchester United manager Tommy Docherty gets asked to compare the current United team with their European Cup winning side of the 1960s, giving each player a mark out of 10, with the 1985 team winning 98 to 89.

In Scotland, the East Terracing at Hampden Park will be renamed the Jock Stein Stand in memory of the former Scotland manager, who died recently.

Aberdeen, Dundee United and St Mirren are all flying the flag for Scottish football in Europe this week.

Also in European competition, Bangor City of Wales have hit the jackpot after being drawn against Spanish giants Atletico Madrid.

Glenn Roeder of Newcastle United gets asks about his favourites, and his favourite cartoon character is The Pink Panther.


Peter Beardsley, playing for England, is the cover star of Match, as England, Scotland and Republic Of Ireland have discovered their group opponents in the 1990 World Cup.

1989-1990 has been a season of violence on the pitch in English football, with Sports Minister Colin Moynihan calling for players who misbehave to be arrested. Bryan Robson and Terry Butcher hit back against such a suggestion.

England and Republic Of Ireland face each other in the 1990 World Cup groups, having met in Euro 88, while Scotland also face familiar opponents, Brazil, who they met in the 1982 World Cup group stages.

Gary Shaw, currently playing in Austria, is hoping to return to the Football League, but is still struggling from the effects of a knee injury.

Ajax are eyeing up English clubs for potential friendlies as they are currently serving a UEFA ban.

One English club playing a high profile friendly is Arsenal, who travel to Ibrox to take on Rangers in an Unofficial British Championship, with Arsenal midfielder Brian Marwood saying this match is an opportunity to enhance Arsenal’s reputation.

There is a feature on competition winners who got to meet the England team.

John MacPhail of Sunderland tells Shoot he still has the legs to take part in Sunderland’s promotion battle at the age of 34.

Talking on veterans, there is a full page profile of QPR’s midfield duo of Ray Wilkins and Peter Reid, both well into their 30s.