MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 7.10.1989

John Barnes is the cover star of Match as England face a crunch World Cup Qualifier away to Poland.

It’s not just England in a crunch game, as Match previews matches involving Republic of Ireland and Scotland.

One man hoping to go to the World Cup if England get there is Mike Newell, who is profiled after a goal filled start to his career at Everton since signing in the summer.

Peter Shilton gets interviewed by Match, and the feature is accompanied by a piece on the oldest footballers in history.

The magazine ends with an advert for the Match 1990 Football Yearbook.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 2.3.2002

The World Cup is not far off, and the race is on to be leading the line for England in the Far East. Michael Owen is guaranteed to go, but the race is on to partner him.

Match does a feature on current Premier League managers who have been cover stars in Match during their playing days.

Match assesses England’s striking options and their chances of going to the World Cup, and it’s good news for Michael Owen, Robbie Fowler, Teddy Sheringham and Emile Heskey.

Match has a weekly series called The Men For Sven, profiling England’s squad players. This week’s subject is Gareth Southgate.

Staying with World Cup previews, there is a profile of Group C teams Costa Rica and China.

One of the strikers profiled earlier, Emile Heskey, gets a three page profile.

Hot players profiled by Match include Patrick Suffo, Marco Di Vaio and Maurice Ross.

In Spain, Barcelona striker Patrick Kluivert reveals that he wants to one day play in England.

In letters, Ross Bissell from Dundee predicts that Scotland will do well at Euro 2004 under newly appointed manager Berti Vogts.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – NOVEMBER 2002

Kanu and Thierry Henry are the cover stars of this edition of When Saturday Comes, modestly complimenting themselves on Arsenal’s brilliant start to the season.

This editions editorial focuses on footballer’s autobiographies, after Manchester United have banned their players from writing autobiographies after the fall-out from Roy Keane’s recent book.

The furore, gets further investigated in a full page article.

Across the page, there is an article about Darlington’s failed bid to sign Faustino Asprilla, ahead of their move to a 25,000 seater stadium in 2003.

Talking of new stadiums, there might be new ones coming in Republic of Ireland and Scotland, as both countries are making a joint bid to host Euro 2008, with the lack of current stadiums in both countries getting featured by WSC.

The 2003 Women’s World Cup Qualifiers get featured, with France standing between England and a place in the finals.

The French are now allowing their women’s team to use the Clairefontaine facility that the men’s team used to win the 1998 World Cup, and have set a goal of winning the women’s one by 2007.

The tournament was moved from China to USA due to the SARS outbreak, while France won the Qualifier but went out in the group stages. They didn’t win the 2007 competition.

There are features on recently relegated Midlands clubs Derby County (2002) and Coventry City (2001) as they try to get back to the Premier League.

Ahead of a documentary which is about the be premiered, there is a double page spread on the North Korea team that reached the 1966 World Cup Quarter-Finals.

Peter Taylor is helping out at Peterborough, just two years after being England manager, which is covered with the witty headline “From Becks To Posh”

There is a profile of Richard Witschge, highly rated by Johan Cruyff but couldn’t get a game for Blackburn.

Sepp Blatter has just been re-elected FIFA President, and one writer takes him up on his promise to give Oceana an automatic World Cup place.

The monthly look at the best of the web takes a look at the best Welsh football websites, with the national team making a good start to the Euro 2004 Qualifiers.

WSC heads to Norway to look at the problems in club football caused by Rosenborg’s dominance in the 1990s.

Talking of declines, WSC looks at the decline of Scotland and Austria as European forces, focusing on a Champions League game between Sturm Graz and Rangers in 2000.

The magazine ends with a look at the highlights and lowlights of Sheffield United.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – OCTOBER 2004

Various stars from Barcelona are the cover stars of this edition of Four Four Two, as the club are at the beginning of a revival after a few lean years at the start of the century.

Steve McManaman is the subject of this Month’s Cash For Questions, where he urges Wayne Rooney to stay at Everton, and reveals his first footballing hero was Bob Latchford.

Brian Clough uses his column to suggest that Trevor Brooking should replace Sven Goran-Eriksson after a sex scandal involving the Swede. Clough died before this magazine hit the shelves.

Lloyd Dyer of West Brom and Alan Blayney of Southampton are the subject’s of this month’s The Boy’s A Bit Special. Blayney reveals he doesn’t share Antti Niemi’s love of Metallica and Iron Maiden.

Robbie Savage uses his column to talk about his excitement about the forthcoming World Cup Qualifier between England and Wales at Old Trafford. It would be a match he wouldn’t take part in as he was suspended after his red card against Northern Ireland the previous month. He never played for Wales again.

Lawrie McMenemy is subject to a Q and A where he reveals that he’s not much of a drinker.

New Chelsea goalkeeper Petr Cech is also subject to a Q and A, where he reveals that Arsenal were interested in signing him in 2002. Eventually, in 2015, he would sign for Arsenal.

Cover stars Barcelona get 15 pages of coverage, as they return to the Champions League after a season in the UEFA Cup, after a turbulent period at the start of the century. That month, they would give a debut to an unknown teenager called Lionel Messi.

There are three pages dedicated to a round table discussion between fans of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ahead of the 2006 World Cup Qualifiers, where England, Wales and Northern Ireland were all the the same group.

Gilberto Silva of Arsenal reveals a dark secret to Four Four Two ……… he plays the Mandolin.

Pete Winkleman is interviewed as MK Dons begin their first season in Milton Keynes, having stolen Wimbledon’s place in the Football League.

Elswhere in the Football League, there is a full page feature on Nick Barmby, as he has signed for his local club Hull City.

In Scotland, there is turmoil at Hearts as the club plans to sell Tynecastle and play home games at Murrayfield.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 9.12.1989

Match action from Scotland v England is the cover image of this week’s edition, as the two countries could be paired together in the forthcoming draw for the 1990 World Cup.

Bobby Davison of Leeds United shows Match around his house, sharing his matchday routine and his CD collection.

It’s the 2nd Round of the FA Cup, and Aylesbury are hoping to shock Northampton Town. Their manager Trevor Gould knows someone with FA Cup pedigree, his brother Bobby won the competition 18 months earlier.

Hans Gilhaus of Aberdeen gets a profile, stating that his best form is yet to come, despite a goalscoring start to his career in Scotland, saying that Aberdeen have a lot of similarities to his former club PSV Eindhoven.

In news, South African born Roy Wegerle is hoping to play for USA in the 1994 World Cup, as he’ll have to wait until 1991 to get US citizenship.

David Platt tells Match he has no plans to leave Aston Villa, having turned down Watford and Hibs to join them from Crewe.

In foreign news, Chris Waddle could have increased competition at Marseille, with the club strengthening their squad.

2019 IN PICTURES – AUGUST

August 2019 began with a bit of a bang, it was hard to keep up.

On the 1st of the month, I went to see Linfield take on HB Torshavn in the UEFA Cup.

A few hours later, I headed to Edinburgh for a break, taking in two football matches, some Street Art and a walk up Arthur’s Seat

Upon my return from Edinburgh, it felt like I was having a permanent residency at Windsor Park for the rest of the month, taking in Linfield’s matches against Institute, Sutjeska, Coleraine and Qarabag.

Linfield v HB Torshavn

Edinburgh Street Art

Edinburgh Street Art Photo Album

Dunfermline Athletic v Dundee

Dunfermline Athletic v Dundee Photo Album

Hibernian v St Mirren

Hibernian v St Mirren Photo Album

Arthur’s Seat

Arthur’s Seat Photo Album

Linfield v Institute

Linfield v Sutjeska

Linfield v Coleraine

Linfield v Qarabag

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WORLD SOCCER – JULY 1973

Action from a recent international between England and Scotland is the cover image of World Soccer during the summer of 1973.

The editorial focuses on discipline, with Alan Ball getting an indefinite ban from international football after a red card in Poland, debating if players in English club football should be allowed to appeal a red card.

England’s end of season tour gets reviews – a World Cup Qualifier in Poland (defeat) and friendlies in Soviet Union (win) and Italy (defeat), which have provided more questions than answers.

In Czechoslovakia, Spartak Trnava’s title bid as back on track after some disappointing results.

East Germany’s hopes of qualifying for the World Cuop in West Germany are now relying on their qualifier against Romania later in the year.

In Yugoslavia, Red Star Belgrade have stormed through to take the title.

Going back to Germany, this time to West Germany, it is reported that manager Helmut Schon faces a tough task to add the World Cup in 1974 to the European Championship, after a run of disappointing results.

Meanwhile in France, it is reported that the future of football in the country is described as “healthy”

Despite winning a third successive European Cup, all is not well at Ajax, with Spanish clubs eyeing up their stars. One of those clubs is Barcelona, who blew the title in the run-in, finishing second to Atletio Madrid.

Sunderland’s recent shock FA Cup win, beating the two previous winners en route, has instigated a debate if the difference in standard between England’s first and second tiers is as large as is made out.

In Wales, it is expected that their away game in Poland will decide if they have a chance of going to next year’s World Cup, while Cardiff City are hoping to arrange a special friendly to commemorate the opening of their £250,000 grandstand extension.

There is article on Dave Clements, who has recently emerged as Northern Ireland’s star player.

There is a tribute to John Connelly, a World Cup winner in 1966, who has just retired.

In Spain, clubs are now allowed to play two foreign players, with the writer describing it as a “black day” for Spanish football, as it will attract money grabbing mercenaries rather than improving the standard of Spanish football.

There is a review of the European Cup Final, which focuses more on Juventus poor performance than Ajax’s win.

Juventus were not involved in this season’s Anglo-Italian Cup, with Brian Glanville spending two pages writing about why the competition should be scrapped.

There is a review of the final weeks of the Irish League season, where Glentoran beat Linfield 3-2 in the Irish Cup Final, despite losing goalkeeper Alan Patterson to injury.

There is also a focus on World Cup Qualifying, with the big headline in Europe being the elimination of Hungary.

Scotland’s hopes of reaching West Germany will decided in their crunch encounter against Czechoslovakia in September.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOOTBALL MONTHLY – MAY 1986

Gary Lineker is the cover star of this edition of Football Monthly in the early summer of 1986 as the World Cup in Mexico nears.

The editorial focuses on that World Cup, commenting that England, Northern Ireland and Scotland will be at a disadvantage due to a lack of preparation time due to club commitments.

England’s warm up friendly away to Soviet Union, a 1-0 win in Tblisi, gets a double page feature.

Meanwhile, Real Madrid were celebrating after winning their first title in six years.

Oxford United’s win over QPR in the recent League Cup Final gets a four page feature, including a team poster in the centre spread.

Also celebrating were Justin Finch and Darrell Dunscombe, who were crowned UK Subbutteo Champions, the tournament getting a full page of coverage.

Having just signed for Barcelona, there is a full page feature on the career so far of Mark Hughes.

Bryan Hamilton gets a full page interview as he aims to steer Wigan Athletic towards Division Two.

As the World Cup gets closer, there is a four page preview of Group F, which features England.

Ian McShane also looks forward to the World Cup, even though he will miss a lot of it due to filming commitments for the new series of Lovejoy, revealing that he travelled to Mexico to watch England when the World Cup was last there in 1970.

In Scotland, Alex Ferguson is facing the agonising decision of having to leave players out of his squad as he is set to decide who does and doesn’t go to Mexico.

Jack Charlton began his reign as Republic of Ireland manager with a defeat to Wales, while Martin Harvey will be back in Northern Ireland’s coaching staff in Mexico.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 29.9.1973

England, Scotland and Wales form part of a collage for the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot, ahead of a big week of international football. Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are in World Cup Qualifying action, while England face Austria in a friendly.

In news, Arsenal have used their matchday programme to defend the sale of Frank McLintock by stating that he wouldn’t be getting many first team games in the future.

After making a return to Manchester United’s team, Shoot have announced that George Best will be making a return to Shoot as a columnist.

Bobby Moore uses his column to state that England’s upcoming friendly is excellent preparation for the key World Cup Qualifier against Poland.

Shoot suggests that a defeat to Austria might be good for England as they lost a friendly to Austria in 1965 while preparing for the 1966 World Cup, which they won.

England are looking for a favour from Wales as they visit Poland, and Wales manager Dave Bowen promises that his team are going for the win.

Wlodi Lubanski of Poland is interviewed, stating that a win is far from guaranteed for Poland.

Kevin Keegan uses his column to state that the difference between players in England’s First and Fourth Divisions is Skill.

Ally Hunter of Scotland tells Shoot that the fans at Hampden must back the team all the way during their World Cup Qualifier against Czechoslovakia.

Pat Jennings tells Shoot about how Northern Ireland’s fanatical fans at Windsor Park give the side a 1-0 headstart. Unfortuntely, due to The Troubles, Northern Ireland are playing home matches in England, the upcoming World Cup Qualifier against Bulgaria will be at Hillsbrough.

The magazine ends with a poster collage of European stars from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Austria who will be facing UK teams this week.

ARTHUR’S SEAT

I planned to do something, and I went and did it, walking up Arthur’s Seat during my recent stay in Edinburgh.

It’s a hill in Edinburgh, not particularly demanding, but far from easy.

I’d always heard people talking about it, and walking it, so I decided to have a go myself.

I set aside a morning to do this. I decided I would get up early. When I say early, I mean early, my taxi dropping me off just after 6am.

The reason for this, my logic being is that the roads would be clear for my taxi, and there wouldn’t be many people around.

Arthur’s Seat is based in Holyrood Park. I’d seen signs all over the city for Holyrood Park but never really knew where it was. Turns out it’s a very big park.

Thankfully, my Taxi Driver was very knowledgeable when I asked to be dropped off at the start. He took me from my accommodation in Sciennes to an entrance just after the Royal Commonwealth Pool.

I decided to see how far I could get in 30 minutes, turns out I was near the top, so I just continued my journey.

When I reached the top, I was disappointed to learn (Just a joke, I already knew) that there wasn’t a seat in Arthur’s Seat. I really needed one.

I just stood and look over Edinburgh, it was wonderful, I could look over the entire city, with clear views. The only downside was that it was a bit of a rubbish sunrise.

I could even see Easter Road, the first in what might be the only one in a series called Football Stadiums Seen From The Top Of A Hill.

Amazingly, I wasn’t the only one there, as it was surprisingly busy for just after 6.30am on a Monday morning.

Somehow, I ended up taking a different route down than the one I went up, and ended up in Canongate. No problem, I knew how to get back to my accommodation from there, and it gave me an excuse to call in somewhere for breakfast.

From now on, every time i’m in Edinburgh, i’m going to put an early morning trip to Arthur’s Seat on my schedule.

I’m hoping that 2020 will be the year I finish off Bray Head, do Arthur’s Seat again, and at some point between now and then, see how much of Cavehill I can do.

And then in 2021, Kilimanjaro. Just joking, I get knackered walking up Pleasance.

Photo Album