MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 12.5.1990

Later today, Alan Pardew will lead out Crystal Palace for the FA Cup Final. In 1990, he was playing for Crystal Palace, appearing on the cover of Match with current Stoke City manager Mark Hughes, then a Manchester United player, with the FA Cup sandwiched inbetween them.

As you open the magazine, Mark Bright is interviewed, urging Crystal Palace to make him a contract offer he can’t refuse, amid speculation over his future.

Across the page, Gary Pallister is interviewed, stating the the FA Cup offers a lifeline to a disappointing season for both him and United.

In traditional cup final fashion, the teams get profiled by a team-mate, Gary O’Reilly for Palace and Mike Phelan for United.

Phelan reveals that Steve Bruce is known as “Empty head” due to knowing a lot of useless facts, and Paul Ince is known as “Mr Quote” due to his love of speaking to the press.

In news, Ronnie Rosenthal states he won’t be returning to Standard Liege for the following season, with Liverpool, where he on loan, being his preferred destination.

It’s also Cup Final Day in Scotland, where Celtic face Aberdeen, and this gets a double page profile.

With the World Cup in Italy approaching, Match looks at those players with ambitions of being on the plane, and the choices Bobby Robson has to make.

Ally McCoist gets a profile, where he reveals a fondness for Brooke Shields, a fear of Spiders, and that his favourite thing about Match is photos of Ally McCoist.

In Match Facts, 18 year old Mark Bosnich made what Match described as a “reasonable” debut for Manchester United in a 0-0 draw with Wimbledon.

In their foreign round-up, Napoli win Serie A, but their star player Diego Maradona wants to leave and join Marseille.

As part of their World Cup preview, South Korea get a double page profile.

The magazine ends with a double page profile on Paul Gascoigne, as Match assesses his performance against Czechoslovakia in one of England’s warm-up games.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.5.1990

Today at Wembley, an expensively assembled and underachieving Manchester United side with a manager under pressure and living in the shadow of a retired Scottish legend arrive at Wembley to take on Crystal Palace in the FA Cup Final, hoping that winning the FA Cup will be the springboard to an era of success.

If that sounds familiar, it’s because we’ve been here before, in 1990.

As supporters sat in front of their TVs with only four channels, unless you had one of those new on the market satellie dishes, it’s possible they may have been reading Shoot’s preview, which had a split cover of Brian McClair and Ian Wright as Manchester United face Crystal Palace.

As you open the magazine, Shoot has full page profiles on central defenders set to be involved, with Andy Thorn of Palace prepared to play through the pain barrier, and Gary Pallister of United aiming to prove he won’t be a flop at United, after a British Record transfer from Middlesbrough.

In news, Celtic manager Billy McNeill is planning a clear out in the summer, while Manchester United are planning to sign Denis Irwin from Oldham Athletic, who Shoot have erroneously described as a Dubliner.

Bray Wanderers will be facing St Francis in the FAI Cup Final at Lansdowne Road, the game moved from Dalymount Park after the FAI anticipated Derry City to win their Semi-Final against Bray.

Midfielders aren’t ignored in the game at Wembley, with Shoot doing a profile of Bryan Robson and Andy Gray.

Celtic are facing Aberdeen in the Scottish Cup Final, and Shoot does a full page profile on Jacki Dzieckanowski, where he reveals his favourite band is Dire Straits.

Aberdeen are represented with a full page profile of Brian Irvine, who talks about his Christianity.

After scoring winning goals in the 3rd Round and Semi-Final, Mark Robins gets profiled.

In world news, Bayern Munich became the first German club to be floated on the Stock Exchange.

Austria are this week’s preview ahead of the World Cup in Italy, mostly focusing on Toni Polster.

Curiously, Shoot does a double page interview with Mark Bright and Ian Wright as they go out for a cycle.

Liam Brady gets profiled ahead of Republic Of Ireland’s friendly against Finland, but his appearance will only be symbolic, as it is a farewell in his own testimonial, having retired from international football the previous September.

It won’t stop him going to Italy, as he’ll be going to the World Cup as a pundit for RTE.

David Rocastle talks to Shoot about his frustration at injuries leading to his loss of form. The article is accompanied by a competition where you can win The Rocky Road To Success, a VHS tape profiling David Rocastle.

Liverpool’s recent title success gets profiled, with Alan Hansen claiming the club can dominate English football for the next twenty years.

The magazine ends with a double page profile of Scotland ahead of the World Cup in Italy.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 28.5.1983

It’s Cup Final Day in England and Scotland, but it’s the English game that is on the cover of this week’s edition of Shoot, as Brighton take on Manchester United at Wembley.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread with Bryan Robson, Jimmy Case and Michael Robinson giving their thoughts on the game, with Robson wanting to win the cup for Remi Moses, who was suspended for he game, alongside Steve Foster of Brighton.

There is also a double page interview with the two managers, Ron Atkinson and Jimmy Melia, both Scousers.

There is a feature on the two referees in London and Glasgow, with David Syme achieving a rare double, referee the Scottish Cup Final 16 years after his dad did.

In ads, you could buy a Paolo Rossi branded boot, made by Pony.

In posters, the centre page spread is a poster collage of Manchester United and Brighton players.

Gary Shaw previews the European Cup Final between Juventus (who eliminated holders Aston Villa) and Hamburg, with Shaw predicting a win for Juventus, and addressing rumours of a move for him and Gordon Cowans to Italy, stating he is well suited to continental football.

Shaw also previews the FA Cup Final, stating he wants United to win, only because it would secure a UEFA Cup place for Aston Villa.

Staying in the West Midlands, West Brom’s Dutch duo of Romeo Zondervan and Martin Jol being annoyed about their exile from the national team, and declaring that the standard of football in England is better than in Holland. Jol speaks about Holland’s best young players, including Frank Rijkaard, stating “He would only last one game in England, he twists and turns too much and holds the ball too long”

1983 was the year Everton won the league …….. for Liverpool, with a 2-0 win over Manchester United at Goodison Park which ended United’s title challenge, with Everton defender Mark Higgins believing the club are on the verge of making a serious challenge in future years to send the title to the blue half, rather than the red half of Merseyside.

Another Blue (of the Manchester variety) hoping for a big future was Alex Williams, who had a breakthrough season at Manchester City, and was setting his sights on being England’s goalkeeper.

It wasn’t a World Cup year, but there was news about the competition this week, with the official film of the 1982 tournament being broadcast on TV after cinemas in the country deemed it too expensive to show., while Toluca was rejected as a host city for Mexico 86 sue to security fears.

From the World Cup to the British Championship, Northern Ireland head to Hampden Park looking to get their first win in 7 visits. A more prouder record, is Sammy McIlroy, who has played in Northern Ireland’s last 22 games and is looking to continue that run.

There was also coverage of the Scottish Cup Final, with a poster of Aberdeen and Rangers, and interviews with John McClelland, Peter McCloy and Jim Leighton.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 18.4.1981

John Wark, in action with Nottingham Forest’s Stuart Gray, is the cover star of Shoot, previewing cup Semi-Finals in both England and Scotland, as title chasing Ipswich Town face Manchester City at Villa Park.

The editorial, calls for a change in the structure of English football, claiming there are too many games (there were 42 games in England’s top flight that season) as the national team is struggling as a result of players being too tired.

Shoot previews both FA Cup Semi-Finals, making the bold prediction that the final will be Wolves v Ipswich. The final, was Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester City. They also predict that it would be an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final. They were half right, as it was Rangers v Dundee United.

Andy Gray has a column in this edition, focusing on Scotland’s recent World Cup Qualifier against Northern Ireland (which finished 1-1), complaining about the defending for Northern Ireland’s goal, and stating that Scotland were confident of getting a good result in the return game in Belfast (It finished 0-0)

He states that Scotland were happy with two wins and two draws, but had expected the two wins to be at home rather than away.

He also previews the FA Cup Semi-Finals, unsurprisingly predicting his Wolves team would beat Spurs, and that Ipswich would beat Man City. He’s got a future in the punditry game, that boy.

In news, Arsenal are battling with Inter Milan, Juventus, Bayern Munich and Hamburg for Michel Platini, set to leave St Etienne at the end of the season, and TV Commentator Martin Tyler has a book about the history of the FA Cup Final ahead of this year’s game, the 100th FA Cup Final.

For just £1.60 plus P and P, you could have a framed portrait of the 1981 Aston Villa team. To be fair, they did win the league that season.

There is a double page poster of all four FA Cup Quarter-Finals, and the goals which decided them.

Derek Johnstone and Danny McGrain take it in turns to do a Scottish football column for Shoot, and it was Johnstone’s turn, hoping for an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final, so that Rangers could get the chance to avenge their defeat to Celtic in the 1980 final.

There is then a double page poster of the Home Nations (England in a friendly v Spain, Scotland v Northern Ireland and Turkey v Wales World Cup Qualfiers) and Republic of Ireland (v Belgium) internationals. Shoot describes Wales as “The best placed Home Nation to reach the finals”

As it turned out, Wales were the only home nation not to reach the 1982 World Cup finals.

Rotheram United, battling for promotion to the Second Division, get a full page profile, focusing on the success of their young manager, Ian Porterfield, with a team poster overleaf.

After 14 years without the league title, there wasn’t much cheer for Manchester United supporters in 1981, but they did win one trophy that year …….. Shoot’s Best Programme of all England’s top flight clubs.

In 1981, a copy of United Review cost 20p, had 24 pages and only 1 page of adverts.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a feature on promising youngsters at West Bromwich Albion dubbed “Atkinson’s Angels” featuring Remi Moses and Bryan Robson. Within six months, Robson, Moses and Atkinson would all have left Albion for Manchester United.

On the back page, there is a profile of Brighton star Steve Foster, pictured with trademark headband, where he reveals his favourite singers are Paul McCartney, George Benson and Dennis Waterman.

2013 IN PICTURES – APRIL

It’s fair to say that April was a busy month.

The first Saturday of the month, I went to two football matches in a day, both Irish Cup Semi-Finals. That night, I went to see Ellie Goulding at Waterfront Hall.

The following morning, I went to get some Street Art photos from the Lagan Towpath.

Three days later, I was in Glasgow to see Linfield in a friendly. I stayed for a few more days so I could see James at SECC, supported by Echo and the Bunnymen.

While I was in Glasgow, I managed to get some Street Art pictures, and attended the Scottish Cup Semi-Final between Falkirk and Hibs.

As you can imagine, I went camera happy during that trip.

Upon my return to Belfast, I was out getting photos of a mural of Bananaman in Great Victoria Street, as you do, before seeing Linfield finish off a miserable season with two home defeats.

Glentoran v Portadown

Glentoran v Portadown Photo Album

Cliftonville v Crusaders

Cliftonville v Crusaders Photo Album

Ellie Goulding Live At The Waterfront Hall

Ellie Goulding Live At Waterfront Hall Photo Album

Down By The Towpath

Glasgow Street Art

Glasgow Street Album Photo Album

Rangers v Linfield

Rangers v Linfield Photo Album

Falkirk v Hibernian

Falkirk v Hibernian Photo Album

Echo and the Bunnymen Live At SECC

Echo and the Bunnymen Live At SECC Photo Album

James Live At SECC

James Live At SECC Photo Album

Bananaman/Stay Puft

Linfield v Ballinamallard United

Linfield v Crusaders

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 12.3.1994

Ryan Giggs is the cover star, as Shoot are previewing the Quarter-Finals of the FA Cup and Scottish Cup.

All eight teams in the FA Cup Quarter-Finals get featured, including a double page spread where West Ham midfielder Matt Holmes visits his old school in Luton, who West Ham face.

John McGinlay wrotes a two page profile of his Bolton Wanderers team-mates, including describing one team-mate as permanently on a sunbed.

You may or may not be surprised to learn that he was referring to Phil Brown.

Shoot previews the Scottish Cup Quarter-Finals by interviewing Hearts midfielder Jon Colquhoun ahead of their tie at Ibrox against Rangers, where he focuses on their former Rangers Striker Mo Johnston, as being key to their hopes.

The final two pages are dedicated to the Merseyside Derby, also taking place that weekend, pointing out that football in the city is in decline with both teams out of the FA Cup and not challenging for the title (Everton eventually avoided relegation on the last day of the 93/94 season)

The piece ends ‘Will Liverpool and Everton ever regain their crown?’

Almost 19 years on, the answer remains no.

PHOTO DIARY OF A FOOTBALL SEASON – APRIL/MAY

April began, like February, with two matches in one day.

Unlike when I was in London, I knew where I was going. I went to both Irish Cup Semi-Finals as a neutral.

The Glentoran v Portadown game wasn’t very good, and I didn’t get much in the way of photos. Crusaders v Cliftonville was a batter game with better photos, the Sydenham End of The Oval being a lot more photo friendly

The following midweek, I was in Glasgow for the friendly between Rangers and Linfield. The match wasn’t great, but it was a friendly, so I was hardly expecting both teams to go for it, especially with it being towards the end of the season (ie – if it was in pre-season, it would have been a lot more intense, with teams working towards the new season)

Ibrox is a fantastic stadium, architecturally stunning on the outside and inside. Managed to get some fantastic shots of the ground. Not so much match action, as I was closer to the corner flag when Linfield had their bets spell of attacking, in the second-half.

I stayed in Glasgow for a few more days, and went to the Scottish Cup Semi-Final between Falkirk and Hibernian. A brilliantly crazy game for a neutral, maybe not so much if you supported one of the two teams. Got some ok photos, Hampden PArk, as fantastic stadium as it is, isn’t very photo friendly.

Upon my return, I went to Linfield’s last two games of the season. Fixture fulfillment really, and making sure I got my money’s worth out of my Season Ticket.

I would have got more Value For Money if i’d stayed at home.

But that wasn’t the end of the season. The following week, I went to Clandeboye Park to see Bangor beat Tobermore United and avoid relegation.

And with that, my season was over.

Glentoran v Portadown

Glentoran v Portadown Photo Album

Crusaders v Cliftonville

Crusaders v Cliftonville Photo Album

Rangers v Linfield

Rangers v Linfield Photo Album

Falkirk v Hibernian

Falkirk v Hibernian Photo Album

Linfield v Ballinamallard United

Linfield v Crusaders

Bangor v Tobermore United

Bangor v Tobermore United Photo Album

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF A FOOTBALL SEASON : 2012-2013

Barring something dramatic, the 2012-2013 season is over for me in terms of football attending.

The season began in June at the Amsterdam Arena, and ended in May at Clandeboye Park.

Unsurprisingly, most of the Linfield matches I attended weren’t particularly enjoyable.

There wasn’t much in the way of curiousities (last season, I saw two twins on opposing sides) apart from going to two matches in once day – twice, and there being a power failure at a match I was at.

Amazingly, it was an FA Premier League game, rather than an Irish League game.

So here, is a statistical look back at my 2012-2013 football season :

Matches Attended : 52

Goals Seen : 147 (should be 149, but I missed 2 goals in 2 different matches due to being late)

Red Cards : 11 (Plus also 2 players sent-off in dressing room for on field incident)

Hat-Tricks : 2

Matthew Tipton (Orangefield OB v Linfield, Linfield v Coleraine)

Penalties Missed/Saved : 7

Highest Scoring Match : 7 (Linfield 5-2 Coleraine, Falkirk 3-4 Hibernian AET)

Countries Seen Matches In : 5

England, Holland, Northern Ireland, Republic Of Ireland, Scotland

Teams Seen Play : 35

Australia (1st time), Azerbaijan, B36 Torshavn (1st time), Ballinamallard United (1st time), Ballymena United, Bangor, Cliftonville, Coleraine, Crusaders, Donegal Celtic, Dungannon Swifts, Falkirk (1st time), Fulham, Glenavon, Glentoran, Harland and Wolff Welders (1st time), Hibernian, Heart of Midlothian, Holland (1st time), Israel, Linfield, Lisburn Distillery, Luxembourg (1st time), Manchester United, Northern Ireland, Norwich City, Orangefield OB (1st time), Portadown, Queens Park Rangers (1st time), Rangers, Reading (1st time), Rosenborg, Shamrock Rovers (1st time), Scotland, Tobermore United (1st time)

Competitions Watched : 11

County Antrim Shield, European Cup, FA Premier League, Irish Cup, Irish League, Irish League Championship 1, Scottish Cup, Scottish Premier League, Setanta Cup, UEFA Cup, World Cup,

Stadiums Visited : 20

Amsterdam Arena, Ballyskeagh, Clandeboye Park, Craven Cottage (1st time), Cregagh Sports Ground (1st time), Easter Road, Ferney Park (1st time), Hampden Park, Ibrox (1st time), Loftus Road (1st time), Mourneview Park, Old Trafford, Seaview, Shamrock Park, Stangmore Park, Solitude, Tallaght Stadium (1st time), The Oval, Tillysburn Park (1st time), Windsor Park,

FALKIRK 3-4 HIBERNIAN 13.4.2013

Having been in Glasgow over the weekend, I decided to take in the Scottish Cup Semi-Final at Hampden Park between Falkirk and Hibernian.

I turned up and got a ticket on the day with no problems from a ticket booth outside the ground. It was only 15 quid, which wasn’t bad for a match of this magnitude, seeing as I had paid the same amount for a friendly at Ibrox three days earlier.

I had the choice of ends, so went for the Falkirk end. Nothing against Hibs, I just fancied cheering on the underdogs.

My seat was right at the back of the stand behind the goal (to the left of your TV screen) but there were enough empty seats for me to head down for a closer view of the pitch.

That said, the seat I had at the back of the stand had a fantastic view.

Just over five minutes in, Falkirk went 1-0 up and the end I was in went delirious. Hibs missed an amazing chance to equalise. You need to Youtube it. It was easier to miss, but the player lost his composure.

In fact, the whole Hibs team had lost their composure, as Falkirk looked more comfortable with and without the ball.

By 29 minutes, Falkirk were 3-0 up. I looked around and saw people in disbelief. Falkirk deserved this lead.

At half-time, I walked around the forecourt, and saw grown men hugging each other in disbelief. I imagine it was probably the same in the Hibs end, but for opposite reasons.

When it went to 3-0, there were Hibs fans leaving the ground. The anger was clear to see. Every misplaced pass was met with groans.

The second-half was entirely different, with Hibs fans having a more United front, getting behind their team. Instead of groans, misplace passes were met with words of encouragement.

When coming from 3-0 down, you need an early second-half goal. When the ball went in, there seemd an inevitability that Hibs would go on to win.

The onslaught never happened. With each passing minute, Falkirk fans around me dared to believe they would win, especially when Leigh Griffiths missed a penalty.

That hoped was dashed when Hibs scored twice in five minutes to send the game to extra-time.

Despite a breather between full-time and extra-time, once the game restarted, it was all Hibs, and they went 4-3 up through Griffiths.

From there, Hibs didn’t look like losing the lead, though Falkirk had a great chance towards the end of the game.

It was an enjoyable game to be at as a neutral, maybe not so if you support one of the two teams, especially Falkirk.

Photo Album

 

 

GLASGOW

Spent a few days in Glasgow recently, arranged at just over two weeks notice, but had a brilliant time.

The main purpose of my visit, was to see Linfield take on Rangers in a friendly, but after checking the listings, as James were playing in Glasgow on the Saturday night, a plan came into my head to stay Wednesday to Sunday, making the most of some leave I was owed.

I’d only previously been to Glasgow twice, both making brief visits and not really getting to see much of the city.

I was there in 2002, stopping off between Kinross (I was going to T In The Park) and Belfast, and having some time to kill, I spent an afternoon there, then returning in 2008 for the Scotland v Northern Ireland match, only spending a brief time on the afternoon of the match in the city.

I’d always been meaning to spend an afternoon in Glasgow whenever I visit Edinburgh every August, but had never got round to it.

After an early morning flight, I was soon getting used to the city and wandering around. I found the City Centre to be quite easy to navigate, if you used Buchannan Street, Sauchiehall Street and Central Station as a reference point.

After an afternoon in the City Centre, it was a short underground ride to Ibrox for the match between Rangers and Linfield.

The match, wasn’t great, you could tell it was a friendly as neither side was getting too stuck in.

The quality of football, wasn’t important, as it was about seeing Linfield and visiting a new stadium.

Thursday, was a lazy day, taking the opportunity to catch up on sleep after an early morning flight on Wednesday.

After a wee browse around the City Centre, managing to stumble around new places and get totally lost, not that I was complaining, I headed to Hampden Park to visit the Football Museum there.

It was a well set up museum, with some interesting articles, focusing on many aspects of football, including off field stuff such as old Hampden press boxes, dressing rooms, as well as old shirts, memorabilia of Scottish clubs, and Scottish players/managers who have made an impact of the game further afield.

On the Friday, James were doing an intimate show in Stirling, I would have loved to have got a ticket for this and spent a day in Stirling. I was considering going on a day trip somewhere, but decided to stay in Glasgow for the day.

I spent late morning/lunchtime at Kelvingrove Museum. It’s a bit out from the City Centre (I had to get a taxi there) but it’s well worth a visit.

There was an exhibition on Scottish football history, very similar to the museum at Hampden, with a lot of exhibits on loan from Hampden.

Despite the similarity, it’s well worth a visit, as are some of the other exhibits. It’s a very family friendly place, and even had an organ recital over lunch.

I headed back into the City Centre and had some lunch in The Arches, a live music/drama/comedy workshop under the Central Station Bridge, before heading for a wee walk around the City Centre.

That evening, I headed to Mitchell Library, for a talk called ‘Where Is Scottish Football Going?’ as part of the Aye Write Festival.

The talk was interesting, and it was clear the passion was there from the contributors, there was little in the way of disagreement.

The following day, there was a talk looking at the Media industry post Leveson which I would have loved to have attended, but unfortunately, the time was inconvenient.

The reason for that, was that I was back at Hampden Park for the Scottish Cup Semi-Final between Falkirk and Hibs. I managed to get a ticket for 15 quid on the day, and it was an enjoyable game as a neutral, maybe not so much if you supported one of the two teams, especially Falkirk.

After a wee break in my room, it was straight to the SECC to see Echo and the Bunnymen, followed by James.

A fantastic concert featuring two bands I love.

From there, I headed back to the hotel. The three main events I attended were easily to get to, with a very good (in my experience) Public Transport network, with train stops convenient to the venues, and police managing post event crowds very well.

There was a comic moment on Saturday afternoon as a Policewoman on a horse was trying to give instructions to a crowd waiting to get into Mount Florida train station.

They weren’t listening to her as they were too busy laughing at her horse, which had just casually pissed itself.

Four days was possibly too much, but it was worth staying that long just to see James. I had a great time on my first proper visit to Glasgow, a nice city with a good event infrastructure, good selection of places to visit, shops, places to eat, etc.