MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – FEBRUARY 1989

Lou Reed and Simply Red, are the co-cover stars, as Q looks ahead to the final year of the 1980s.

But first, who feels Q’s wrath this month? Sunday Sport, since you ask, the subject of their “What the hell does ……..” column.

Q does a three page feature on Viz, an unlikely success in recent years, as well as an emerging talent in the world of Blues, Jeff Healey.

There is a full page tribute to Roy Orbison, who died in December 1988.

In news, Billy Idol appeared at a charity gig, doing an acoustic set, while Simple Minds announced the release of a new single called “Belfast Children”

Not sure if it was an error by Q, or a late change, but it was eventually released as “Belfast Child”, and became Simple Minds only UK Number 1.

Mark Knopfler got 5,900 spoilt vites in the recent US Presidential Election.

In letters, Q got correspondence asking what both The Buzzcocks and Cat Stevens were up to these days.

Lou Reed gets five pages, giving a rare interview, where he defends himself for doing an advert for American Express.

Mick Hucknall is interviewed, laughing at a Daily Mirror story claiming he was to become a hermit, living in Milan with a 500 sq ft kitchen.

Between recording in Spain and living in Italy, Hucknall hasn’t seen much of his home city of Manchester lately, defending it’s reputation, saying “I never get hassled in Manchester. Northerners aren’t like that”

One thing that Manchester has over Milan is Indian restaurants, “There isn’t an Indian restaurant in Milan, which I find incredible”, moans Hucknall.

Q does a feature on “Songwriters For Hire” and what they do, focusing on the main hitmakers (still working to this day) such as Albert Hammond (Dad of Albert Hammond Jr from The Strokes) and Diane Warren.

Q makes their predictions for who’ll be big in 1989, predicting big things for Guns n Roses and Londonbeat.

50 YEARS OF TOP OF THE POPS : JUN 6 – JUN 12

It’s been a struggle to get this week’s round-up done, as i’ve spent most of the week in hospital.

I’ve been diagnosed with a condition called Tomjonesitis, where you randomly start singing Tom Jones songs. I asked the doctor if it was common, he replied …… It’s Not Unusual.

And now to a song which is just as brilliant and ridiculous as my Tom Jones joke.

Meanwhile, Charlie Simpson off of Busted (but not McBusted) turns 29 this week. Pop fact, this song was originally called “Crash and Burn” but was changed after the Columbia Shuttle Disaster

This week’s sad anniversary, 4 years since the death of Stuart Cable. This, filmed in his hometown of Cwmbran.

If you don’t know Mick Hucknall by now, you will never ever know him.

Nick Rhodes from Duran Duran turns 52 this week. Incidentally (according to the Youtube bio) this performance was broadcast on 6th November 1986, the day Sir Alex Ferguson became Manchester United manager.

Rob Pilatus from Milli Vanilli would have been 49 this week. Seriously, how did people not know they didn’t sing on their records?

It got worse for Fabrice Morvan, as he lost out on an insurance ad deal to Morgan Freeman.

Meanwhile, much loved popular Darts player Jackie Wilson would have been 80 this week.,

Matt Bellamy from Muse is 36 this week. Pop fact, his dad was in The Tornadoes. You know, Telstar.

Reg Presley from The Troggs would have been 73 this week. Wet Wet Wet ensured he never had to worry about money for the last 18 years of his life. Don’t you just want to run your hands through Marti Pellow’s hair? Just me?

Holy Europop!!! It’s Robyn

And finally, some Good Souls

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JANUARY 1997

January 1997 is the subject of the latest Magazine Archive, set during the peak years of Britpop, and featuring Oasis on the cover, focusing on the Q Awards, which had just been recently staged.

It was a period when Q was mourning one of their main writers, John Bauldie, who was a passenger in the helicopter crash which killed then Chelsea Chairman Matthew Harding, which is commemorated in the obituaries section.

A whopping fifteen pages are dedicated to the Q Awards, with the first page of the feature having a double paged photo of various guests on stage, engaging in small talk.

Eagle eyed readers will have noticed Dermot Morgan and Ruud Gullit in conversation. It is worth clarifying that Ruud Gullit wasn’t sat on a shed, possibly because it wasn’t Christmas.

1996 was the year that saw Q celebrate it’s 10th anniversary, and the awards ceremony saw various celebrities record video messages of congratulations.

Amongst them, was Tony Blair, then Leader Of The Opposition, recorded one saying “Ten years in power with no opposition – Sounds good to me”. It was almost prophetic.

Ian Brodie was riding on the crest of a wave in 1996 on the back of “Three Lions” and gets five pages looking at his career to date, with minimal mentions of Baddiel and Skinner.

That month, Lightning Seeds were 11 in the Album Chart, being kept out of the Top Ten by Robson and Jerome, Spice Girls, East 17, Simply Red, The Smurfs, Boyzone and Rod Stewart.

Sometimes, history is better off being rewritten.