MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10.4.1982

It’s the FA Cup Semi-Finals, and this is reflected on the cover with a player from each competing club – Leicester City, Queens Park Rangers, Tottenham Hotspur and West Bromwich Albion – are featured.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on the two games, with a player from each club giving their thoughts ahead of their game.

In news, Bobby Charlton was complimentary about Wigan Athletic, stating they had the potential to become a top flight club. They eventually would be, 23 years later.

After having their most successful season in the top flight, Brighton players are bringing out a pop record called “In Brighton”, described by captain Steve Foster as “It’s got a pop disco sound and it’s very complimentary about the team”

Talking of pop records, Northern Ireland have done one as well for the World Cup with former Eurovision winner Dana. It got better for the squad. As well as getting to do a record with Dana, they got a £77,000 bonus between them.

It’s all change at Everton with manager Howard Kendall placing his emphasis on young players, including goalkeeper Neville Southall, who he compared to Peter Shilton.

In competitions, you can win a trip to the World Cup Final in Madrid.

Phil Thompson uses his column to bemoan the standard of refereeing in Liverpool’s European Cup exit against CSKA Sofia, claiming they were robbed. Down to the Semi-Final stage, Thompson predicts that the final will be between Aston Villa and Bayern Munich,

There is a full page feature on club football in the USA.

There is a poster of Pat Jennings for a series called “World Cup Stars To Watch”. Jennings was rumoured to be attracting attention from clubs in North America. Not content with heading to Spain that summer, Jennings was also looking at trying to play in the 1986 World Cup.

In Scotland, the Scottish Cup is also at the Semi-Final stage, with both games being previewed. Danny McGrain’s column discusses a recent 5-0 win for Celtic against Rangers, but it wasn’t their Ibrox rivals they faced, it was a Hong Kong team with the same name, during a mid season break for Celtic.

Staying in Scotland, one of those Semi-Finalists, Forfar Athletic get previewed. Airdrie have tried a novel way to improve morale, by getting a comedian, Hector Nicol to entertain his team before matches. Nicol’s humour was described by Shoot as “Making Billy Connolly look like a choirboy”

With the World Cup approaching, Cameroon get a double page feature, with an interview with Francois Doumbe Lea and a profile of their manager, Branko Zutic.

Manchester City manager John Bond uses his column to clarify rumours about his son Kevin’s future, stating that he was staying at Maine Road.

In adverts, there is an advert for Panini’s World Cup sticker book, which is going to be free in Shoot in the coming weeks.

Going to the World Cup is Jim McLean, as part of Scotland’s backroom team. He combine that with his role as Dundee United manager, and Director at Tannadice, a role he has recently accepted.

1981-1982 was the first season of 3 points for a win in England, and Ray Wilkins uses his column to declare it a success, though admitting he’s not a fan of it.

In international news, El Salvador will only be taking 18 players to the World Cup due to costs, while Felix Magath faces a race against time to be fit for the World Cup due to injury, with the story accompanied by a picture of him being visited in hospital by Horst Hrubesch, Ernst Happel and Gunter Netzer.

In adverts, you could buy pyjamas in the colours of your favourite team’s kit – as long as you supported England, Northern Ireland or Argentina. There were also various club team options not pictured.

Gary Shaw uses his column to describe the European Cup Semi-Final draw against Anderlecht as “Ideal” as it avoided a trip behind the Iron Curtain (CSKA Sofia) and the favourites (Bayern Munich)

Shaw also comments on team-mate Allan Evans getting a Scotland recall, stating that playing against Dynamo Kiev in the previous round could be helpful for Scotland’s group game against the Soviet Union, as most of their squad is made up of Dynamo players.

He signs off by wishing Tottenham Hotspur good luck in their European Cup Winners Cup Semi-Final against Barcelona.

Villa and Spurs ties are previewed from the Spanish and Belgian viewpoints, with West Ham’s Francois Van Der Elst stating that the winners of Aston Villa v Anderlecht will go on to win the trophy.

The magazine ends with an interview with Martin Buchan, who states he is not planning to leave Manchester United, despite losing the captaincy.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.8.1984

The 1984-1985 season is about to start, and it’s Mark Hughes, billed as “one of the young hopefuls trying to break into the team at Old Trafford next season” who is the cover star of Shoot.

Shoot gives United a double page spread, saying they have the potential to be England’s biggest box office attraction, due to the number of attacking players in their squad.

Vince Hilare gets a full page profile, after being blasted for leaving Crystal Palace for Luton Town, citing the lure of top flight football and Luton’s attacking style of play as the reason for his move.

Another player on the move is Mick Mills, who has left Ipswich for Southampton. At the age of 36, he feels this is his last chance to win the title, having gone close with Ipswich in 1981 and 1982.

European draws have thrown up trips behind the Iron Curtain for Liverpool and Aberdeen in the European Cup, as well as a Northern Ireland v Republic Of Ireland clash between Linfield and Shamrock Rovers.

The UEFA Table is used to allocate UEFA Cup places based on results, with England top ahead of Italy and USSR.

Shoot does a double page feature on new Barcelona manager Terry Venables, where he describes the job as the biggest test of his career.

Venables old club QPR are getting used to life without him, but Terry Fenwick predicts a title challenge under new manager Alan Mullery.

Charlie Nicholas reveals in his column that Kenny Sansom fancies himself as an impressionist, with Norman Wisdom, Frank Spencer and Prince Charles his favourites.

Shoot looks at he the lack of job security for managers in Scotland, with 20 of the 38 league clubs changing manager between the summers of 1983 and 1984.

Mike Hazard gets a full page feature, having overcome an addiction to chocolate and hamburgers to get a place in the England squad.

Kenny Dalglish writes about his excitement of the forthcoming season, as Liverpool face Everton in the Charity Shield at Wembley. The two sides had met earlier in the year in the League Cup Final, which Liverpool won the replay 1-0 at Maine Road, though Dalglish incorrectly says the game was at Old Trafford.

In news, West Ham are looking to replace Frank Lampard Snr with Colin Gibson from Aston Villa, Liverpool have been told that Celtic won’t sell Paul McStay to them, and Billy Bingham says he have to rethink his tactics for away games after Northern Ireland’s defeat to Finland in their opening World Cup Qualifier.

Steve Foster is this week’s “Focus On ….” subject, where he reveals he likes all music, except Boy George.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 18.4.1981

John Wark, in action with Nottingham Forest’s Stuart Gray, is the cover star of Shoot, previewing cup Semi-Finals in both England and Scotland, as title chasing Ipswich Town face Manchester City at Villa Park.

The editorial, calls for a change in the structure of English football, claiming there are too many games (there were 42 games in England’s top flight that season) as the national team is struggling as a result of players being too tired.

Shoot previews both FA Cup Semi-Finals, making the bold prediction that the final will be Wolves v Ipswich. The final, was Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester City. They also predict that it would be an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final. They were half right, as it was Rangers v Dundee United.

Andy Gray has a column in this edition, focusing on Scotland’s recent World Cup Qualifier against Northern Ireland (which finished 1-1), complaining about the defending for Northern Ireland’s goal, and stating that Scotland were confident of getting a good result in the return game in Belfast (It finished 0-0)

He states that Scotland were happy with two wins and two draws, but had expected the two wins to be at home rather than away.

He also previews the FA Cup Semi-Finals, unsurprisingly predicting his Wolves team would beat Spurs, and that Ipswich would beat Man City. He’s got a future in the punditry game, that boy.

In news, Arsenal are battling with Inter Milan, Juventus, Bayern Munich and Hamburg for Michel Platini, set to leave St Etienne at the end of the season, and TV Commentator Martin Tyler has a book about the history of the FA Cup Final ahead of this year’s game, the 100th FA Cup Final.

For just £1.60 plus P and P, you could have a framed portrait of the 1981 Aston Villa team. To be fair, they did win the league that season.

There is a double page poster of all four FA Cup Quarter-Finals, and the goals which decided them.

Derek Johnstone and Danny McGrain take it in turns to do a Scottish football column for Shoot, and it was Johnstone’s turn, hoping for an Old Firm Scottish Cup Final, so that Rangers could get the chance to avenge their defeat to Celtic in the 1980 final.

There is then a double page poster of the Home Nations (England in a friendly v Spain, Scotland v Northern Ireland and Turkey v Wales World Cup Qualfiers) and Republic of Ireland (v Belgium) internationals. Shoot describes Wales as “The best placed Home Nation to reach the finals”

As it turned out, Wales were the only home nation not to reach the 1982 World Cup finals.

Rotheram United, battling for promotion to the Second Division, get a full page profile, focusing on the success of their young manager, Ian Porterfield, with a team poster overleaf.

After 14 years without the league title, there wasn’t much cheer for Manchester United supporters in 1981, but they did win one trophy that year …….. Shoot’s Best Programme of all England’s top flight clubs.

In 1981, a copy of United Review cost 20p, had 24 pages and only 1 page of adverts.

Meanwhile, Shoot does a feature on promising youngsters at West Bromwich Albion dubbed “Atkinson’s Angels” featuring Remi Moses and Bryan Robson. Within six months, Robson, Moses and Atkinson would all have left Albion for Manchester United.

On the back page, there is a profile of Brighton star Steve Foster, pictured with trademark headband, where he reveals his favourite singers are Paul McCartney, George Benson and Dennis Waterman.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 23.1.1993

There’s a Welsh theme to this week’s cover of Shoot, as Gary Speed and Dean Saunders, battling for possession are the cover stars.

The editorial for this edition looks at recent postponements, and dismisses the idea that English football should have a Winter break. Seems some debates never die.

Posters included in this week’s edition are a random bunch : Don Hutchinson, Lawrie Sanchez, Dundee United team, Martin Keown and Jorginho.

It’s the weekend of the FA Cup 4th Round, and Manchester United take on Brighton at Old Trafford, in a repeat of the 1983 Final. Steve Foster, in a second spell at Brighton, played in the replay (He was banned from the final) and was interviewed about the game, and his memories of 1983.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, a reader from Corby writes in to question QPR’s 5 million pound valuation of Les Ferdinand. In 1995, Les Ferdinand left QPR for Newcastle for a fee of 6 million pounds.

Shoot dedicates a double page spread to reviewing the standard of punditry on BBC, ITV and Sky Sports.

Gary Lineker is described as “His attempts at humour are like Ian Botham on A Question Of Sport (ie – not funnny at all)” – I could not possibly comment.

Shoot also mocked Andy Gray for his frequent use of the term “That’s a great example for all the kids watching”

Meanwhile, Kevin Keegan is given a platform to showcase his four point plan for the future of English football, which includes reducing the Premier League to 18 teams (It was reduced to 20 teams in 1995), Professional referees, five subs (This was introduced to the Premier League in 1996) and games being split into four periods of 25 minutes.

Oh well, three good ideas out of four aren’t bad.

Neil Webb, having rejoined Nottingham Forest from Manchester United gets a double page profile about the move.

Shoot did a series during this season where they visited clubs to see who could win a 100m Sprint, Hardest Shot, Long throw.

There was a shock at Dundee as goalkeeper Paul Mathers had the hardest shot. Unfortunately, his score for Longest Throw and Hardest Shot weren’t enough to get him in the overall Top Three, taken from all the clubs who had participated so far.

Maybe it was that article which convinced David Jeffrey to sign him for Linfield in 1999?

Harvey Lim of Gillingham (Longest Throw) and Neil Masters of Bournemouth (Hardest Shot) were the leaders, since you ask.