MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.1.1986

It’s a cup edition of Shoot this week, with the FA Cup 3rd Round, and a World Cup calendar included in this edition. The cover star, Ray Stewart of West Ham and Scotland, was hoping for glory in both.

Don Howe is interviewed, where he says he knows he could lose his job as Arsenal manager and his role in the England coaching set-up if both teams fail in 1986.

Manchester United’s FA Cup tie against Rochdale is previewed, with Shoot warning that Steve Taylor could be Rochdale’s danger man.

Nigel Callaghan gets a full page profile after handing in a transfer request at Watford, but denies he has had a bust-up with manager Graham Taylor.

Steve Moran tells Shoot that he hopes 1986 will bring him better luck that 1985, when he damaged knee ligaments in and end of season friendly in the Caribbean

Jan Molby gets a full page feature, crediting Kenny Dalglish for his turnaround in form, and revealing that he practices free-kicks.

Mick Harford also gets a full page feature, but it’s the opposite from Molby’s piece, which sees manager (David Pleat) praising player, stating that the Luton forward should be in the England squad.

It’s all one big love-in this week, with Paul Gascoigne of Newcastle United crediting manager Willie McFaul with the weight loss that has enabled him to be a professional footballer.

Despite English clubs being banned from Europe, they were well represented in the Adidas Awards, with Everton beating Manchester United to Team Of The Year, while Kerry Dixon was a finalist for Golden Boot, alongside Frank McDougall of Scotland and Martin McGaughey of Northern Ireland.

Hibs get a team profile where manager John Blackley declares he is building a team with ambitions of winning the league.

In news, Ian Greaves turned down the job as West Brom manager because they are sponsored by an anti smoking body and he is a dedicated smoker, Aston Villa want to sign Kevin Richardson from Everton, and Tommy Docherty dismisses England’s World Cup chances.

Manchester United defender Graeme Hogg tells Shoot he is hoping to curb his aggression and avoid suspension, while Billy Stark is the subject of this week’s “Focus On ……”

His favourite music is U2, Alison Moyet and Dire Straits.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1981

Liam Brady, sipping from a bottle of water (a glass bottle as well, no health and safety in them days), is the cover star of Shoot, as he adjusts to life in Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Brady, who has so far been a resounding success at Juventus.

In a bid to improve their style of play, Coventry City have banned their players from passing the ball back to their goalkeeper, while the National Hairdressers Federation have voted Lawrie McMenemy as Head Of The Year, alongside Felicity Kendall.

Derek Johnstone uses his column to comment on how Rangers have missed European football in 1980-1981, and are desperate for it to return to Ibrox in 1981-1982, as he reflects on his favourite memories taking on continental opposition.

Another Scotsman with a column is Andy Gray, who states that he is baffled by Wolves recent poor form.

The recent PFA Awards get covered, as John Wark wins Player Of The Year, and Gary Shaw wings Young Player Of The Year.

Ray Clemence’s column analyses the recent League Cup Final between Liverpool and West Ham, which finished 1-1, with a replay due to be played at Villa Park this week. That match gets profiled a few pages over.

Shoot profiles two former England players trying to have success as a manager, Larry Lloyd of Wigan and Norman Hunter of Barnsley, while new Bristol City goalkeeper Jan Moller says he wants to be as good as Peter Shilton, the goalkeeper at the opposition end of the pitch in the 1979 European Cup Final.

Another foreigner in England getting profiled is Bosco Jankovic of Middlesbrough, whose contract is expiring, and he has decide wether to stay in England or return to Yugoslavia.

Diego Maradona gets a profile after becoming the world’s first ÂŁ4m player when he moved from Argentinos to Boca Juniors.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to write about three young strikers at Manchester United he believes will be big stars in the future – Norman Whiteside, Mark Hughes and Scott McGarvey. Two out of three ain’t bad.

Four footballing figures get interviewed on how to improve the game. West Bromwich Albion manager Ron Atkinson is not in favour of Sunday football, but is in favour of three points for a win.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve Moran of Southampton, who reveals that his favourite music is Mike Oldfield and Diana Ross.