MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.12.1985

Paul Walsh of Liverpool is the cover star of Shoot as 1985 approaches Christmas.

In a double page interview, Walsh reveals he was conned into staying at Anfield, and has now been rewarded with an extended run in the team, and is eyeing up a place in England’s World Cup squad.

In news, Chris Turner wants to leave Manchester United due to a lack of first-team opportunities. Across Manchester, City defender Mick McCarthy has been out injured, rumoured to have been suffered in a sprint with an Irish journalist who had £20 bet he could beat him in a race, in the build-up to a recent international.

Staying in the Republic Of Ireland, their state broadcaster has signed a deal to broadcast English games at 3pm on a Saturday, much to the anger of clubs in Northern Ireland, where many people can pick up RTE.

Bryan Robson uses his column to discuss the best and worst referees in England.

Steve Foster gets a double page interview, where he states that Bobby Robson is scared of him because of his reputation, which is why he isn’t getting called up for the England squad.

In Scotland, Davie Dodds had a novel way to beat his goal drought, by dropping back into midfield. It worked, as he hit the back of the net in a recent 3-0 win over Celtic.

Jimmy Greaves gave his Star Letter Award to Mr N Bate of Cambridge, who complains about England not being seeded for the forthcoming World Cup Finals.

Greaves also uses his letters page to say that he was sick and tired of talk of a proposed breakaway Super League in English football.

It would turn out to be prophetic. When the Premier League was formed in 1992, ITV lost the rights, and Saint and Greavsie were no more.

Gary Mabbutt gets a full page profile for his versatility, with opinions varying as to where he fits best on the football pitch.

Across North London, Paul Davis says he doesn’t feel like a first team player at Arsenal, despite playing over 100 games, and has become more competitive in a bit to avoid being dropped.

Ipswich Town are the club who get a profile this week, currently struggling in the top flight.

Staying in East Anglia, Steve Bruce of Norwich City is desperate for the club to return to the top flight having been relegated the previous season, having spent seven years trying to reach it, before joining Norwich from Gillingham, only to be relegated after a season.

The magazine ends with a profile of Tony Dorigo, who reveals that his favourite singers are Bryan Ferry and Stevie Wonder, while his ambition for 1986 is to get an England Under 21 call-up when he gets British citizenship in October.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : NUMBER ONE – 2.8.1989

It’s the summer of 1989, and a jumping Lenny Henry is the cover star of Number One.

In chart news, the “What’s Up” column has Sybil, River Detectives, Lil Louis, Doobie Brothers and Martika as their featured singles.

There is a double pages feature on Stock Aitken Waterman, and their views of the current hit parade.

They started their own label as nobody else would give them a job, despite providing CBS with a Number 1 for Dear Or Alive in 1985.

Waterman is on the warpath describing The Smiths, U2 and Clannad as “The Perry Como and Al Martino of the 1980s”, adding “U2 and The Smiths are boring and old fashioned. Kids today see it as their brother’s music”

Bono gets even more ire, with Waterman describing him as “Bono’s old. He’s got long hair. He’s scruffy”

It’s not just Bono, Waterman also has it in for Acid House, describing it as “The acid house thing …. it’s just a trendy thing, not working class Britain. It’s middle class university students who’ve got £15 to go to the acid house gig and £30 to buy the ecstacy”

Waterman then compares S/A/W to Elvis and Little Richard, and says they are the Liverpool FC of pop, as they work to a winning forumla.

In news, Lenny Henry is about to launch a pop career, albeit in the guise of one of his characters, Theophilius P Wilderbeest. Deacon Blue have announced a tour for December 1989, which begins at King’s Hall in Belfast.

On TV that week, Kylie was on Wogan, Channel 4 had a documentary on Yazz, and BBC 1 has a concert for Stevie Wonder’s birthday.

The Primitives get a full page interview, mostly focusing on what annoys them.

In adverts, tickets for Bros at Wembley were advertised, with support coming from Debbie Gibson and Salt N Pepa, with DJ sets from Simon Mayo and Pat Sharp.

Tony James from Transvision Vamp, Trev and Simon, Roland Gift from Fine Young Cannibals and Paula Abdul take part in Genius Of Pop, Number One’s quiz, with Trev and Simion winning with 6 out of 10.

In the centre pages, yout could get a lyrics poster of Kylie Minogue’s new single, Wouldn’t Change A Thing.

Milli Vanilli get a double page Q and A with Number One. I couldn’t possibly comment if it was Frank Farian answering the questions for them.

Cover star Lenny Henry gets a double page interview, in the guise of his characters Theophilus Wildebeest and Delbert Wilkins.

There is a full page review of the recent Prince’s Trust Concert. Beside it, is Bruno Brooks Radio 1 Roadshow Diary.

A few pages later, there is a half page interview with Eartha Kitt, who is releasing a single recorded with Bronski Beat.

Singles are reviewed by Shirley Manson, future Garbage singer, then fronting Goodbye Mr Mackenzie. Her favourite single that week was Stand by REM.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 19.7.1986

Diego Maradona, held aloft, carrying the World Cup trophy is the cover star of Shoot, as they look back at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

The editor’s page though, looks at the organisation of the tournament, criticising the standard of sound/pictures on the TV coverage, state of the pitches and standard of refereeing.

Elsewhere on the page, he bemoaned the number of British players now playing abroad, asking if stars like Frank McAvennie or Kenny Sansom will be next.

In a recurring theme from 1986 onwards, Bryan Robson has just come out of surgery, and his ready to return for Manchester United, while also appearing in an advert for New Balance boots.

England, Scotland and Northern Ireland’s exploits in Mexico didn’t go unnoticed, as the three teams had a centre page poster, featuring a collage of match action from their games, with the headline ‘THEY DID US PROUD’

There is a free pull-out of a review of the competition, complete with match statistics and line-ups from every game.

Line 7 is another boot manufacturer having an advert in this issue, with France midfielder Jean-Marc Ferreri as their Brand Ambassador.

The tagline in the ad says “Jean-Marc Ferreri scored the equalising goal that helped France secure third place in the World Cup”

I’m no marketing expert, but I think that might need a bit of work.

There were three pages dedicated to an unseen victory for England at the 1986 World Cup, learning from their errors at the 1970 World Cup where they weren’t so open to the Mexican public.

FA Press Officer Glen Kirton used his A-Level Spanish to Liaise with locals, making sure that England’s time in Mexico ran smoothly.

It was pointed out that they had checked out training venues and hotels in Mexico in 1983, as well as a South American tour (1984) and Mexico friendlies (1985) the following summers, as well as players meeting and greeting locals while in Mexico.

During the tournament, players had a lot of free time. Gary Bailey spent most of his time reading a book or listening to his Ghetto Blaster.

England players made the most of movies lent to them by CBS.

Gary Lineker was the king of the pool table, though Glenn Hoddle gave him a run for his money. Hoddle was described as “Like John McEnroe, minus the fiery temper”

David McCreery gets a full page dedicated to him, as he is interviewed about his experiences of the tournament, having been described as Northern Ireland’s player of the tournament by manager Billy Bingham.

A third boot advert, this time Hi-Tec, endorsed by Peter Reid, Steve McMahon and Emlyn Hughes. The boot of Scousers.

In Jimmy Greaves Letters Page, one reader asks if Greavsie thinks Bobby Robson is the right man to lead England. Greavsie speaks up in support of Robson, and was proved right as England reached the Semi-finals in 1990.

Niki Corrigan from Hartlepool writes in to say that Diego Maradona will be remembered as a cheat.

Denmark star Michael Laudrup is the subject of a player profile. He supports Liverpool and Leeds, and his favourite bands are : Wham, ELO, Stevie Wonder and Duran Duran.

His long-term ambition was to play for Denmark in the 1990 World Cup Finals in Italy. Unfortunately, Denmark didn’t qualify.

Having had three boot adverts, there was room for one more advert, but it was Uhlsport, for gloves, featuring some of the world’s best goalkeepers such as Pat Jennings, Walter Zenga, Peter Shilton, Joel Bats, and um …… Jim Platt of Coleraine.

THE FRIDAY FIVE – 30.11.2012

1. Bruno Mars – Locked Out Of Heaven
2. M83 – Midnight City
3. Alicia Keys – Girl On Fire
4. The Vaccines – I Always Knew
5. Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds – AKA …. What A Life (Acoustic)

Time for the usual X-Factor themed chart, except last week, it was a double theme …… ABBA v Motown, those well known rivals. It’s not often you see ABBA and Motown in the same sentence, except, just there.

This will be a bit hard for me as I think ABBA are, whisper it, a bit rubbish.

FIVE ABBA SONGS

1. Knowing Me, Knowing You
2. Lay All Your Love On Me
3. SOS
4. Super Trouper
5. Chiquitita

And now, some Motown songs. If Berry Gordy was still alive ……. oh wait, he is. If you wondering what i’m referring to, Louis Walsh said after a performance last year “If Berry Gordy was still alive” …..

It was almost as funny as the time he said a contestant reminded him of “A young Lenny Henry”

FIVE MOTOWN SONGS

1. Stevie Wonder – Sir Duke
2. Supremes – Stop, In The Name Of Love
3. Jackson 5 – I Want You Back
4. Smokey Robinson – Tears Of A Clown
5. Martha and the Vandellas – Dancing In The Street

Today, is St Andrew’s Day, so to celebrate it, here’s a Scottish themed chart for you

FIVE SONGS BY SCOTTISH ACTS

1. Strawberry Switchblade – Since Yesterday
2. The Proclaimers – Letter From America
3. Cosmic Rough Riders – Melanie
4. Travis – Side
5. Sandi Thom – The Devil’s Beat

THE FRIDAY FIVE – 9.12.2011

1. Kelly Jones – Can’t Take My Eyes Off You
2. Rihanna – We Found Love
3. Madness – You Keep Me Hanging On
4. Kiss – God Gave Rock n Roll To You
5. Oasis – Who Feels Love?

Now for the weekly chart based on the previous week’s X-Factor theme. Last week, it was Motown, and surprisingly, they all sang Motown songs and didn’t rip the piss and/or make it up as they go along.

If Berry Gordy was still alive, he would have loved it. Oh, he is still alive. I suppose that’s what you get when you believe everything Louis Walsh says

FIVE MOTOWN SONGS

1. Gloria Jones- Tainted Love
2. Chairmen Of The Board – Give Me Just A Little Moe Time
3. Supremes – Stop In The Name Of Love
4. Stevie Wonder – Uptight
5. Smokey Robinson – Tears Of A Clown

Meanwhile, ITV are broadcasting a 90 minute special tonight, titled ‘The Nation’s Favourite Bee Gees Song’, which is basically an admission that they have no original programming ideas, and are filling up 90 minutes with celebrities talking about the Bee Gees.

So, here is my definitive Bee Gees Top Five. There are no Disco songs. And rightly so.

FIVE BEE GEES SONGS

1. You Win Again
2. For Whom The Bell Tolls
3. I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You
4. Massachusetts
5. This Is Where I Come In

Meanwhile, Blur are being awarded with ‘Outstanding Contribution To Music’ at the Brit Awards, only 12 years after Spice Girls.

To be honest, the day they gave the award to Spice Girls (SEVEN FUCKING YEARS BEFORE THEY GAVE IT TO OASIS!!!) totally devaulued it, but it gives me an excuse for a Blur Top Five

FIVE BLUR SONGS

1. Country House
2. Tender
3. End Of A Century
4. Charmless Man
5. Beetlebum