MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : WHEN SATURDAY COMES – DECEMBER 2002

Having just broken into the Everton team, teenage sensation Wayne Rooney give an interview to When Saturday Comes. Well, sort of.

A blank speech bubble represents the fact that Everton manager David Moyes has blocked media requests to interview his young player.

The editorial focuses on racism in football, most notably at the European Championship Qualifier between Slovakia and England, but warns that football authorities in England need to address concerns closer to home.

There is a profile of former Belgium goalkeeper Jean-Marie Pfaff, now forging a new career as a Reality TV star in a Flemish version of The Osbournes.

There is a feature on four clubs at differing ends of the football pyramid who are looking to move out of their current ground to a new one – Wimbledon, Chelsea, York City and Brentford.

In Scotland, there is a feature on the race for one of the more invisible honours, 3rd place, aka The Best Of The Rest after Rangers and Celtic, looking at those clubs aiming for that spot.

A more curious phenomenon in recent years was Masters Football, which WSC likened to ageing rock stars only playing hits from 20 years previously.

There is a feature on “lost footballers”, big money signings on high wages. The poster boy of this feature is Mark Bosnich, earning £40,000 in Chelsea’s reserves.

This edition focuses on young players, with a look at the number of French coaches at underage level in England.

Cover star Wayne Rooney is part of a feature looking at the history of hype of young players in English football.

There is also a feature on club football in Czech Republic, due to improved perfomances in Europe this season, with many teams boosted by Euro 96 stars coming home to play their club football.

Yeovil Town get a feature, so long a famous Non League giantkiller, and now on the verge of joining the giants they used to kill.

The rivalry between Cardiff City and Swansea City gets a feature, being described as becoming a poisonous affair in recent years.

The magazine ends with a brief look at the history of Cheltenham Town’s highlights and lowlights.

Advertisements

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.5.1997

Juninho and Gianfranco Zola are the covers of this edition of Shoot, previewing the 1997 FA Cup Final between Chelsea and Middlesbrough, with the headline ‘Battle Of The Mighty Midgets’

Italians Gianfranco Zola and Fabrizio Ravenelli get double page spreads previewing the game, as do Juninho and Mark Hughes, as well as player profiles of the two line-ups.

Shoot’s pull-out results magazine rounds up the 1996-1997 league season. It was a season when the top five titles were all won by clubs from the North West of England. Manchester United won their 4th title in 5 years, Bolton Wanderers marked their last season at Burnden Park with an instant return to the Premier League, Bury pipped League Cup Semi-finalists Stockport County to win Division Two, Wigan won Division Three on Goal difference from Fulham, while Macclesfield Town won promotion to the Football League, where they remained before relegation in 2012.

For Fulham, it took four years, and Wigan, it took eight years for them to get promoted to the Premier League, where they have been ever since. Swansea City, now in the Premier League, lost the Play-Off Final to Northampton Town. Hull City finished 17th in Division Three, before getting promoted to the Premier League in 2008.

There was an advert for a magazine called Babe Hound, with a tagline of ‘More Big Girls Than Juventus v Dortmund’ (Those two sides were to contest that season’s European Cup Final)

The cover star for the current edition was Jo Guest, which featured posters of Dannii Minogue, Gina G, Victoria Adams (you may know her now under her married name of Beckham), Jennifer Aniston and Gillian Anderson.

You couldn’t have a more 1997 lad mag if you tried.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22nd MAY 1993

This edition focuses on Shoot’s 1993 FA Cup Final review edition, which unfortunately for them, required a replay to be played on the date of publishing.

The cover stars are Paul Warhurst and Ian Wright battling for possession in the original game.

A report of the FA Cup Final gets a double page spread.

In rumours which look silly now : Barnsley want Gordon Strachan to be their manager, and Manchester United are going to sign David Platt, Stuart Pearce, David Hirst and Roy Keane.

Aston Villa apparantly want to sign Stan Collymore. They did, four years later, after he had spells at Nottingham Forest and Liverpool.

Brian Clough marks his retirement with an exclusive interview, which gets a page dedicated to it.

Aldershot Town get a page dedicated to them. Founded in 1992 from the ashes of Aldershot FC, they were started again in the bottom tier of English football.

Manager Steve Wignall said the club have a realistic ambition of being a Football League club again by 2003. They did make it back to the Football League, but not until 2008.

Jimmy Greaves letters page is as crazy as ever.

Ashley Ballhatchet from Farnham Common cheerleads for Julian Dicks getting into the England squad.

John Richards from Sunderland is unimpressed by the idea of Sunderland leaving Roker Park to a new 40,000 all seater stadium.

Meanwhile, with qualification for the 1994 World Cup looking unlikely, the plight of Scottish football gets a double page spread.

Scotland ended up qualifying for Euro 96 and France 98, but nothing since.

With Manchester United winning their first title in 26 years, long serving captain Bryan Robson gets a double page spread about his delight at this.

It was a good year for Welsh football. With the national team making a serious bid for World Cup qualification (they eventually lost out in the final game), Cardiff City and Wrexham were promoted from Division and Swansea City reached the Division Two play-offs.

In Division Two in 1992/1993 were current Premier League clubs Stoke City, Bolton, West Bromwich Albion (all three promoted), Fulham, Wigan Athletic

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – JULY 1999

The summer of 1999 is the focus for this edition of “The Magazine Archive”, looking at Four Four Two and their end of season awards.

Bizarrely, despite winning The Treble, there were no Man United players featured on the cover.

Cheltenham Town’s promotion to the Football League was the subject of parody with a mock tourist brochure being drawn up showcasing the delights of Cheltenham.

A column by Paul Simpson looking at footballing achievements remarks that Man United’s treble still has a long way to go before matching Linfield’s Seven trophies in 1922.

The always funny in retrospect feature “The Boy’s A Bit Special” makes an appearance profiling current Norwich City player Adam Drury, Clinton Morrison, and Seth Johnson, the player often used to personify the transfer excesses at Leeds United under the Peter Ridsdale/David O’Leary.

In the letters page, one reader wrote to express his opinions on the behaviour of players during a recent Old Firm game, and how their actions can affect crowd behaviour.

Given the recent furore about the Scottish Cup Replay between the two sides, it seems some things never change.

Dwight Yorke won the award for “Best Premiership Player” with Didier Domi being ranked 50th.

Kieron Dyer, who that summer signed for Newcastle United was voted best in Division One, while ex Portadown player Peter Kennedy was voted 36th.

In Division Two, then uncapped Northern Ireland players Maik Taylor and Steve Robinson were in the Top Ten.

Kevin Horlock was 41st, 4 places below former Glentoran player Glen Little.

It’s not too hard which goal was voted the best that season. If you haven’t worked it out yet, it was Ryan Giggs goal in the FA Cup Semi-Final Replay.

In the world of advertising, David Seaman, quite appropriately given the name, is advertising Admiral Aportswear.

Four pages are dedicated to the Youth World Cup, held in Africa (Nigeria to be precise) which was won by Spain.

History repeated itself when Spain left Africa with the World Cup trophy 11 years later, this time, the senior trophy.

A quick look through Wikipedia reveals that Iker Casillas, Carlos Marchena and Xavi played for Spain in both tournaments.

There is a feature on English goalkeepers and why there are so few of them.

A chart is made of the goalkeepers at each Premier League club, with comments on the situation.

For Manchester United, the comment reads “Bad news for Nick Culkin as Peter Schmeichel is likely to be replaced by Edwin Van Der Sar”

Van Der Sar did replace Schmeichel, unfortunately, he wasn’t signed until 2005.

The “More Than A Game” feature focused on the Welsh derby between Cardiff City and Swansea City.

In 1999, both clubs were in the bottom division of the Football League in run down stadiums. How times change.